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Author Topic: Looking to make frozen dough  (Read 859 times)

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Offline AntonioT

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Looking to make frozen dough
« on: September 14, 2020, 07:49:47 AM »
Iím looking to make frozen dough balls for customers who want that. I make a Neapolitan dough 64% hydration using a 12.5% poolish starter. So the amount of yeast in the total mass is very low. Iím using IDY. 2.5% salt. Can I just ball and freeze or do I need to adjust the recipe for freezing? Iíve used manufactured frozen dough balls before but would prefer to make my own. Iíd like to stay away from adding chemicals and whatnot.

Offline Sapp

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Re: Looking to make frozen dough
« Reply #1 on: September 14, 2020, 10:34:14 AM »
Iím just a home cook but I have had success freezing my standard recipe dough balls for as much as 6-8 weeks. I donít have freezer space to freeze the dough in a pretty ball before wrapping it so I just wrap in cellophane and put in a ziplock bag and they freeze in whatever shape they happen to. The defrosted dough performs identically to a freshly made dough with the exception that if they are left at room temperature too long (Say more than two hours after they defrosted to room temperature) itís like they are over proofed.

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Looking to make frozen dough
« Reply #2 on: September 14, 2020, 11:20:06 AM »
If you can live with a maximum frozen shelf life of 15-days what you are proposing doing is totally feasible (assuming you are going to be freezing the dough in a static freezer). Why only 15-days? It has been well documented that yeast which has been subjected to any amount of fermentation does not fare well when frozen in any kind of freezer, much less a static freezer (-10 to 0F with little to no airflow), this results in the potential for significant yeast damage as a result of being frozen which, in turn, leads to dough failure. We do know that the dough will perform reasonably well out to about 15-days but after that it's a crap shoot as to whether it will perform to customer's expectations or not and when we are selling dough you have to remember that FAILURE IS NOT AN OPTION. I would recommend using a yeast spike in the dough (addition of 0.2% IDY when making the dough) then mix the dough as cold as possible (under 70F if at all possible) then immediately go to scaling and balling. Allow the dough balls to rest for 5-minutes then flatten into "pucks" about 1 to 1.5-inches thick, lightly oil, place on aluminum sheet pans that have been stored in the cooler, place the dough pucks on the sheet pans and immediately take to the freezer, freeze uncovered for at least 3-hours, then while in the freezer, package the dough pucks in plastic bread type bags (1.5-mil. thickness) being sure to pull the bag snug to the dough puck, twist the open end into a pony tail and apply a twist tie close to the dough puck, place the pony tail under the puck as you package the dough for sale. Note: This is all done in the freezer to prevent condensation from forming on the dough.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline AntonioT

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Re: Looking to make frozen dough
« Reply #3 on: September 14, 2020, 01:01:35 PM »
When you say "yeast spike of 0.2% IDY" is this added directly to the mass after mixing in the poolish? The poolish currently consists of 100% hydration with 1% IDY (of the poolish flour), room temp ferment for 1 hour, then 20-24hrs refrigerated. The poolish is total weight of 12.5% of the total mass. Or would I just up the yeast in the poolish?
How would dough manufacterers get a consistent shelf life of 6-9 months? My flour sits at 75.2f. So I can bring it down with cooler water. I would love to get 2 months shelf life, 3 would be fantastic. I can vaccuum seal the frozen pucks as well in a chamber sealer with 3mil bags, either completely vac'd or just sealed with a light vaccuum.

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Looking to make frozen dough
« Reply #4 on: September 15, 2020, 12:33:12 AM »
No, a yeast spike is added AFTER the poolish, the idea is to have some yeast in the dough that has not been allowed to ferment (it will have a better survival than yeast that has been allowed to ferment). Even the best frozen dough manufacturers only get 21 to 23-weeks of frozen shelf life from their dough. To get that kind of shelf life you will need to blast freeze the dough at -30 to -37F with 600 to 800-linear feet of airflow over the product, or you will need to use a cryogenic freezer (liquid nitrogen or carbon dioxide) with pressure adjusted to give a temperature in the product zone of -50 to -65F, then package and immediately place into a holding freezer at -15F to finish freezing. After 2-hours in the holding freezer the internal dough ball/puck temperature is measured, if it is -15F the time in the cryogenic freezer is correct, if the temperature is higher than -15F the time in the cryogenic freezer will need to be extended and if the temperature is lower than -15F the time in the cryogenic freezer will need to be reduced (as a matter of economics). Date loggers are placed with shipments of frozen dough to monitor dough temperature (temperature abuse is a major cause of dough failure) during distribution.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

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Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Looking to make frozen dough
« Reply #5 on: September 15, 2020, 12:35:25 AM »
One other thing, vacuum packaging is NOT recommended for dough or finished product due to the potential for clostridium. MAP is what everyone uses.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline AntonioT

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Re: Looking to make frozen dough
« Reply #6 on: September 15, 2020, 11:13:56 AM »
Very insightful info. Thanks so much Tom. Lots of research to follow up with. Iíll stick with providing customers fresh dough balls for now. But will try the yeast spike on my next batch to see how that turns out. Guess Iíll try to work into a 2 week in and out cycle for frozen product for now.

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