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Author Topic: Is Canadian flour thirstier?  (Read 884 times)

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Offline gbakay

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Re: Is Canadian flour thirstier?
« Reply #20 on: October 09, 2021, 09:44:20 PM »
Kori, That's the flour from Wholesale Club I use for pizza dough #10063. I emailed Robin Hood for the maximum hydration on that flour and they got to me and said 64% is max.

Offline kori

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Re: Is Canadian flour thirstier?
« Reply #21 on: October 10, 2021, 05:57:52 PM »
Kori, That's the flour from Wholesale Club I use for pizza dough #10063. I emailed Robin Hood for the maximum hydration on that flour and they got to me and said 64% is max.

Thanks for info on the hydration, I've been meaning to send an email to get that info.

I've been very pleased with that flour, works great for NY and American style pizzas. Good for bread and buns as well.
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Offline Shanksworthy

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Re: Is Canadian flour thirstier?
« Reply #22 on: October 10, 2021, 07:39:43 PM »
It's possible that you're really used to sticky. I never use bench flour to make dough balls, and if I do, it's bad sign (it's annoying more than anything  ;D). I don't know if it helps or not, but I made a Youtube video about choosing the hydration of your dough, it's in French though (but you should be able to get the English subtitles, even if it won't be 100% accurate), anyway you can see how are my dough balls and the ones I prefer (toward the end of the video)

Thanks! Actually for some reason YouTube did not offer an English subtitle translation for your video, but I understand enough French to get by, and your explanations were clearer than Iíve ever heard the topic explained in any language. You have a unique talent for communicating and presenting, and your video was very helpful. Thank you!

Offline Shanksworthy

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Re: Is Canadian flour thirstier?
« Reply #23 on: October 10, 2021, 07:54:36 PM »
Robin Hood makes a pizza flour?

Yes they sell what is labeled pizza flour on the bag but not at a retail level, commercial only. They come in 20kg/$19.99, I purchase them from The Wholesale Club, I'm pretty sure there's a few in Calgary. FYI they also carry Stanislaus products now.

https://www.wholesaleclub.ca/unbleached-pizza-flour/p/20311628_EA

As mentioned by QwertyJuan Robin Hood is owned by Ardent Mills and they have re-branded there bags, but same product code. Last time I purchased a bag about 2mos ago it was still the old bag.

Here's the new look.

https://ardentmills.ca/products/traditional-flours/pizza/

Thanks, very interesting. Calgary does have a Wholesale Club, but unfortunately they donít seem to carry that item. Not a big surprise TBH ó Calgary retailers are frustratingly slow to start stocking the things that appeal to me. 😂 Theyíll get there eventually, but Vancouver, Toronto, and Mtl will always get the good stuff before us.
« Last Edit: October 10, 2021, 07:56:33 PM by Shanksworthy »

Offline QwertyJuan

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Re: Is Canadian flour thirstier?
« Reply #24 on: October 10, 2021, 09:37:59 PM »
Thanks, very interesting. Calgary does have a Wholesale Club, but unfortunately they donít seem to carry that item. Not a big surprise TBH ó Calgary retailers are frustratingly slow to start stocking the things that appeal to me. 😂 Theyíll get there eventually, but Vancouver, Toronto, and Mtl will always get the good stuff before us.

Hey... don't complain. You could live in rural NB!!   :'(

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Offline Yael

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Re: Is Canadian flour thirstier?
« Reply #25 on: October 10, 2021, 11:12:53 PM »
Thanks! Actually for some reason YouTube did not offer an English subtitle translation for your video, but I understand enough French to get by, and your explanations were clearer than Iíve ever heard the topic explained in any language. You have a unique talent for communicating and presenting, and your video was very helpful. Thank you!

Cool! Glad it helped! And thank you  :-[
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Offline Shanksworthy

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Re: Is Canadian flour thirstier?
« Reply #26 on: October 11, 2021, 04:39:32 PM »
Hey... don't complain. You could live in rural NB!!   :'(
LOL. I spent many summers of my youth in beautiful rural NB (outside of Fredericton), and have pleasant memories. Does it help that you can order a lot of stuff online now?

I remember as a kid in the 80ís before the internet made it possible to access almost anything from anywhere, I desperately wanted a pair of Vans shoes. I couldnít find them in Mtl where I lived at the time. Then in NB on vacation that summer, while in town on a grocery run, I stumbled on a single pair of Vans in my size at some unassuming strip mall shoe store. Made my year (I was pretty easy to please back then)!
« Last Edit: October 11, 2021, 04:44:23 PM by Shanksworthy »

Offline Shanksworthy

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Re: Is Canadian flour thirstier?
« Reply #27 on: November 02, 2021, 09:57:49 AM »
After further experimentation, I have come to the conclusion that ďyesĒ, Canadian flour, or at least Rogers brand, is much thirstier. Maybe this is also partially related to the higher elevation, but the altitude here is not enough to explain all of it. Hereís my observation; I made another batch at 70.5% hydration (68% flour + 2.5% olive oil) and this time without DM, and it was very dry. I made enough for 4 dough balls, and the first 2 were ok, but dry and tight and dense with more elasticity than Iím used to, even after letting it relax at RT for 4 hrs. The baked pizza came out well, but a little on the dry side (just not pillowy enough for my tastes). I put the remaining dough in the freezer for later.

A few days later when it came time to use the rest of the dough, I defrosted it in the fridge overnight, and the next day when I went to ball it up, I COULD NOT CLOSE THE BALL. It would not stick to itself, no matter what I tried. There was insufficient tack, and it felt quite dry in my hands. I ended up having to toss them out. So I think Iíll continue to experiment with increasing water by 1% at a time. And when the Rogers flour runs out, Iíll try the same experiment with Robin Hood bread flour.

Offline RHawthorne

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Re: Is Canadian flour thirstier?
« Reply #28 on: November 02, 2021, 01:58:26 PM »
I assume it mightíve been just a figment of my imagination, but I have always perceived a difference on my palate between American whiskeys and beers and Canadian products of that nature. The Canadian products just always seem a touch dryer to me, and I have intuitively guessed that this is indeed probably due to the higher latitude, or some factor in the soil. I donít know, but Iím glad somebody else seems to be wondering the same thing.
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