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Home Ovens / Re: Using Pizza Party in cold temperatures
« Last post by RussG78 on Today at 10:55:37 PM »
Thanks for the replays. I'm actually interested in the 70x70 wood fire version. Guess I should of specified that from the beginning. If the oven can get up to temp in the middle of winter in Canada I'm guessing I should have no problem here. I have never used a wood fire pizza oven and just want to make sure I can use during the winter months. Seems like a pretty amazing oven and looking forward to ordering one.
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New York Style / Re: Couple of NY pies at home in Philly tonight
« Last post by jvp123 on Today at 10:46:00 PM »
Nice work!  :chef:
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Hearth Ovens / Re: [mid-build] WFO dome
« Last post by Tscarborough on Today at 10:45:07 PM »
Refractory concrete with wire reinforcing. It is stronger in all respects than normal concrete.  On the same oven, however, there is an example of how you could buttress the perlcrete, which is what I would have done alone if it was a built in place oven.

The first pic shows the form for the monocoque shell, the second shows the stucco in place, the third shows the perlite filling (loose perlite in this case since it was not structural, but for buttressing it would have been 6-1)
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Hearth Ovens / Re: [mid-build] WFO dome
« Last post by thedaniel on Today at 10:24:15 PM »
Wait, what was filled in that form around your brick base, then? I thought it was a cement + insulation mix. Is it just concrete?
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New York Style / Re: More flavour in dough
« Last post by norma427 on Today at 10:23:10 PM »
is the point of tom's suggested experiment that the crust made from the higher protein flour will have more flavor because there's more protein to denature?

OD,

I never did the exact experiment like Tom posted, but did make dough with AP flour for NY style pizzas.  Frank Giaquinto did a great job with that dough and pizza, but it sure didn't taste like a regular NY style pizza that is made at market.

Maybe Peter can answer your question.

Norma
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New York Style / Re: More flavour in dough
« Last post by norma427 on Today at 10:20:39 PM »
Norma, the more I think about it, the more the term, "darker" seems very relative. To me and my bakes, the darker my outer rims are, the more baked they are. That of course leads directly to over-baked, which is when my sweeter CF wheaty flavors start to greatly diminish. Probably other things in play like sugar's effect on fermentation and stuff. Makes my head spin off sometimes just thinking about trying to understand more than fleeting glimpses at a time.

I just mix it, break it and bake it -  and repeat as necessary.   ;D

Roy

Roy,

I think you are right about the darker the crust the more it is baked, but in a deck oven it really doesn't get overbaked unless it is in really long.  A matter of a couple of mintues will give a browner crust in the oven at market.  The bottom won't get too dark.  I never noticed cold fermented wheaty flavors, but then my taste buds aren't like yours.  I really wonder about sugar's effect on fermentation.  I had wanted to do some tests on that but never got around to it.  I also have a hard time understanding some stuff and doughs. 

You are doing a great job with your pies.  :D Just continue.

Norma
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New York Style / Re: More flavour in dough
« Last post by quietdesperation on Today at 10:08:27 PM »
is the point of tom's suggested experiment that the crust made from the higher protein flour will have more flavor because there's more protein to denature?
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Hearth Ovens / Re: [mid-build] WFO dome
« Last post by Tscarborough on Today at 09:54:55 PM »
6-1 is fine, but what will buttress the perlite?  Same problem, perlcrete has zero (well almost) no strength other than in compression.
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Ask the Dough Doctor / Re: Suggestions for greater oven spring?
« Last post by The Dough Doctor on Today at 09:45:39 PM »
Talk to us about what your actual dough temps are.
1) After mixing. (bread machines have a habit of increasing finished dough temperature)
2) At the time of scaling and balling.
3) At the time you open the dough balls into skins.

Punching the dough has a specific purpose, that is to 1) keep the dough in the container. 2) It allows for turning of the dough to help equilibrate the temperature throughout the dough mass. To a lesser extent it provides for a more consistent environment for the yeast which in turn results in a more consistent fermentation rate. Punching the dough does not de-gas the dough in a way that would reduce oven spring properties.
An easy way to increase oven spring is to maximize dough absorption (you have already done that) and then increase the yeast level using a lower (colder) dough temperature to control the rate of fermentation. This will result in greater oven spring.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor
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New York Style / Re: Couple of NY pies at home in Philly tonight
« Last post by Mikemac725 on Today at 09:45:30 PM »
Solid pizza Mikemac725
Waiting on some delco pie pics
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