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Author Topic: Palam pizza in the style of Farinella.  (Read 305 times)

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Offline Kalli

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Palam pizza in the style of Farinella.
« on: July 16, 2017, 02:18:32 PM »
Hello Everyone-

I just saw this interesting post from a few years back.   

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=14244.20

I've been doing Tartine for about a year with the goal of eventually doing pizza more regularly.   I would love to be able to work with a product that does not require a WFO.    I love the pizza that they have at Farinella.   It's not thick, it is layered.  It has a nice crunch.   

So my question here is can anyone lay out the rest of the method that is hinted at in the above post.    The post says "The dough was Tartine start to finish, 20% levain at 9 hours ferment, 75% hydration".   The bulk was at 80 degrees and the proof was at 70 degrees.   

So I'll make the Tartine dough with KABF and then....

-How does this split up with respect to hours?
-Is there no cold fermentation?
-How is the dough shaped (in a pan or for baking on a steel/stone).
-Do you make dimples in the dough?  (as in the Farinella video)

I am going to try cooking at around 430 degrees on a baking steel in my electric oven.     My steel is 1/2 inch thick.   I would like the pizza to be on the thinner side of what is possible with this recipe.

Thanks!
« Last Edit: July 16, 2017, 02:20:12 PM by Kalli »

Offline parallei

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Re: Palam pizza in the style of Farinella.
« Reply #1 on: July 19, 2017, 09:09:38 PM »
Unfortunately, John D. no longer posts on the forum.  A great loss!

I'll try and answer some of your questions, I think I understand what John was up to.

It sounds like you do and understand the Tartine Bread method.  So:


Hello Everyone-

I just saw this interesting post from a few years back.   

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=14244.20

.......So my question here is can anyone lay out the rest of the method that is hinted at in the above post.    The post says "The dough was Tartine start to finish, 20% levain at 9 hours ferment, 75% hydration".   The bulk was at 80 degrees and the proof was at 70 degrees.   

So I'll make the Tartine dough with KABF and then....

-How does this split up with respect to hours?

John didn't say exactly.  But given the Tartine Bread Method (and assuming an active starter), I'd guess 2 hours stretch and whatever additional time needed for the bulk, depending on room temp., maybe an hour or two more.  So maybe four hours before dividing and continuing on like the bread recipe.  Another five hours after dividing seems like a lot,  but who knows what John was chasing. You'll just need to trust your judgement.

-Is there no cold fermentation?

John didn't appear to use one.  However, like the bread recipe you could cold ferment after the intial rise and after preforming.

-How is the dough shaped (in a pan or for baking on a steel/stone).

It looks like John shaped in on the peel.  No pan.  John launched it onto the stones in a wood fired oven.

A 75% HR dough can be tough to launch off the peel, at least for me.  One option is to build the pie on baking parchment paper, launch, the slide he paper out from under the pie after it has set up after a few minutes.


-Do you make dimples in the dough?  (as in the Farinella video)

Don't now that dimpling is really required.  Some dimples will naturally occur as you GENTLY shape the dough to the required size.

I am going to try cooking at around 430 degrees on a baking steel in my electric oven.     My steel is 1/2 inch thick.   I would like the pizza to be on the thinner side of what is possible with this recipe.

It is meant to cook at a higher temp. than that.  I have both a stone and a 1/2 steel I use in my indoor oven.  If it were me, I'd try the stone first, at 550F,  thinking I might get a better balanced bake.  It IS a thicker skin and it will take some time to bake and finish the top.  I'd be worried the steel might toast the bottom.



Thanks!

Let us know what you did and how it turns out.
« Last Edit: July 19, 2017, 09:12:21 PM by parallei »

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