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What exactly are you hoping to improve on? It sounds like you're already quite satisfied with the pan you've been using (if it is a pan; I'm not sure if you're saying you're using a steel or a pan), so what is the objective?
 If you're considering buying a cast iron pan for pizza, my first thought is that those are really more well suited for a thicker crust pizza style, or even deep dish. You didn't say exactly what kind of pizza you like to make, but judging by the bake times you specified, I'm assuming you're making more a thin crust/NY style. If that's the case, I'm not sure that a cast iron pan would do any better than a steel, and I don't think that a pan with high sides would really work, unless you want to make your pizzas smaller than the diameter of the pan and try to maneuver them into the pan. Also, I'd say that unless you use oil in the pan, and plenty of it, your dough is going to stick, so I wouldn't even consider the idea of making NY style pizzas in it, because that would make them completely different.
 Having said that, there's absolutely nothing wrong with "winging it" and just tailoring your pizzas to your pan and not worrying about hitting any certain kind of stylistic guideline. I'd say you could probably try to make some kind of bar pie in a cast iron pan, if that's your thing. Do whatever you like. Just consider all the dynamics that a pan will present you with.

Just need a second pan. I'm using this one as a pizza steel by flipping it upside down. Just wondering if for this price ($35) there was anything better/larger/thicker out there. I ended up buying a 15" cast iron dosa pan that has no sides, only one handle and 1lb heavier so I assume it's thicker than the pan I'm using now as no material is wasted on walls or an extra handle. https://i5.walmartimages.com/asr/08f22aa2-d4a4-4b6e-af21-139d3565e6a5.6d5d4eb39ddef78b2760be0a50501064.jpeg found a used one for $40 shipped. About 2+ lbs heavier than the Lodge pizza pan.
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Im a bit confused, how are you planning to use this? Are you turning it upside down and launching on it like you would with a pizza stone? Or are you assembling the pizza in the pan and cooking it like a pan pizza? Or something else?

Ah, sorry I wasn't more clear. Yes. I'm flipping the pan upside down and making NY style. I wanted a second pan that I could leave at other places so I don't have to lug this one back and forth.
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New York Style / Re: What percentage of oil and honey?
« Last post by nickyr on Today at 01:02:29 AM »
Sounds reasonable to me.

I think sugar or diastatic malt powder is more common in New York style than honey, but the Koda should be hot enough that you dont need any.

Hydration is typically just water.
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Pizza Cheese / Re: Anyone use Simple Truth Ricotta?
« Last post by Bengoshi on Today at 12:00:26 AM »
And even better, Bellwether also makes an excellent Sheep Milk ricotta.  I use only Bellwether here in Cali, both cow and sheep, high quality (as is the crme fraiche)

bellwether: a wether or other male sheep that leads the flock, usually bearing a bell.
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Neapolitan Style / Re: Pizza Party on Gabriola Island
« Last post by Icelandr on Yesterday at 11:58:49 PM »
There be faults? . . ..  ..  . .


Quelle surprise!
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Shop Talk / Re: Pizza Trailer Business
« Last post by Numerator on Yesterday at 11:27:47 PM »
Can you post some recent screenshots of your rig?
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General Pizza Making / Re: Post a Pic of Your Pie - Daily Update
« Last post by billyjoeusc on Yesterday at 09:33:35 PM »
Here is my first mixed dough. 75% KABF. 25% KA Whole Wheat flour. 68%hydration. Straight dough 6 hour bulk ferment and 24 hours in the fridge. Im vegan so this one has my scratch made vegan mozzarella. It bubbles and has a bit of stretch and is so much better than anything you get in a store. Added some sweet earth vegan deli pepperoni also. The crust is really good. Good flavor, nice chew and crisp crunch. I think it turned out pretty dang good!
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Neapolitan Style / Re: Pizza Party on Gabriola Island
« Last post by apizza on Yesterday at 07:16:33 PM »
But it is true, letting the pizza cool off, exposes a lot of the faults it might have.
But why it always so good with my morning coffee?
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Dough Clinic / Re: wetter doughs knead time?
« Last post by billg on Yesterday at 06:32:53 PM »
is there a general rule of thumb about hydration and knead time? I am having a hard time getting my 70% (Ken Forkish sourdough recipe) to become a smooth ball. Am I perhaps over kneading it? i've tried by hand as well as by kitchen aid mixer on medium for up to 8 minutes. it's always just not smooth and very difficult to handle. Any guidance?


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Cracker Style / Re: BobGraff's Attempt at Aimless Ryan's Tommy's Pizza Clone
« Last post by bobgraff on Yesterday at 06:05:26 PM »
Pizza made from another Tommy's crust/skin + topped with their sauce.

Baking procedure:
6.5 min par bake with sauce (parchment on steel @ 475) + 6 minutes @ 460 convection, fully dressed (screened on steel). 

Still tried to figure out what makes their dough more dense and stiff compared to my own.  The dough color seemed lighter than the last skin I purchased - perhaps the first was exposed to air longer than this one?  I again noted that the dough smelled like it was highly fermented.

I had always assumed that Tommy's dough had a high fat content as their pizzas have a fried quality to them.  Thinking that that Tommy's may grease their pans, I lightly coated the parchment paper with cooking spray.  The baked pizza here seemed less dry than before, but did not achieve the "fried effect".

This is the first time I've tried their sauce by itself.  It seems to be nothing more than crushed tomato, black pepper, and garlic powder.  I did not detect any oil or herbs, but would not be surprised if there was a small amount of salt in it.  I was surprised to find that the garlic flavor was overshadowed by the black pepper.

Par-baking with sauce (heaping 1/4 cup) resulted in a slight sauce burn, but nothing that effected the flavor of the pizza.

The cooked pizza was very good, but still not quite the same as getting a finished pizza from the restaurant.  It's well known that hard cheese and maybe extra garlic powder and/or dried herbs are sprinkled on the pizza, so perhaps those omissions could explain the the difference.
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