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Author Topic: November 2020 Monthly Challenge--Emergency Type Doughs  (Read 2670 times)

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Offline Pete-zza

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November 2020 Monthly Challenge--Emergency Type Doughs
« on: October 31, 2020, 05:56:57 PM »
This month's Challenge pertains to emergency type doughs. Such doughs are typically made and used same-day to make pizzas in just a matter of hours. In my past research, I saw that such doughs are typically made and used within only a few hours, typically under four hours. However, for purposes of this challenge, an "emergency" type dough made and used same day up to about five to eight hours is fine. I would rather strive for a higher quality end product.

In the professional pizza world, pizza operators often make and use pizza doughs that ferment longer than about 4-6 hours, including overnight in many cases. But many such operators also have a standby emergency type dough in case they see that they are going to run out of their regular dough. Also, such a dough might be used if something happens to their regular doughs to render them unusable, such as an overnight power failure or failure to add a specific ingredient, like salt. In general, most emergency type doughs use an above average amount of yeast and an above average water temperatures to speed up the entire process. If the normal dough recipe that is used contains sugar, it is usually cut in half when making the emergency version.

Surprisingly, there has long been a strong demand among our members for emergency type doughs. I came to this realization when I saw that a list of emergency dough pizza and recipes that I put together at https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=8297.msg71576#msg71576 has almost 150,000 page views. I do not believe that any other such list that I produced, either alone or with the help of other members, has such a high page view count. It will also be noted that most pizza styles can be made in an emergency type dough format. I also saw that such pizzas can have a surprisingly high quality. I see a benefit to being able to make a decent pizza in only a matter of a few hours, as the need or urge strikes.

Peter


Offline Yael

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Re: November 2020 Monthly Challenge--Emergency Type Doughs
« Reply #1 on: October 31, 2020, 09:03:30 PM »
Interesting challenge!! I'm in  ;D
“Learn the rules like a pro so you can break them like an artist” - Pablo Picasso

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: November 2020 Monthly Challenge--Emergency Type Doughs
« Reply #2 on: November 01, 2020, 09:23:21 AM »
To add to what I said in my last post, the types of pizza dough recipes that are routinely posted at the websites of yeast producers tend to be short term, or "emergency", type doughs although not called as such. See, for example, the pizza dough recipe at the Red Star website at:

https://redstaryeast.com/recipes/homemade-pizza-crust/

And here is another from Fleischmann's:

https://www.fleischmannsyeast.com/recipe/pepperoni-pizza/

As can be seen from the above recipes, they call for really large amounts of yeast. Most emergency dough recipes are based on normal dough recipes, and converting to emergency dough recipes usually means doubling or tripling small amounts of yeast of the normal recipe, with the final amounts of yeast in the emergency recipe being much lower than called for by the above recipes.

Peter

Offline spacelooper

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Re: November 2020 Monthly Challenge--Emergency Type Doughs
« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2020, 01:34:49 PM »
This dough was about 4.5 hours. My wife wanted Chicago deep dish so I whipped up Pythonic's Malnati recipe. It did not disappoint. I am a huge fan of same day doughs personally. Placed Stone on 2nd rack from bottom and baked directly on stone @ 450 for 27 minutes.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: November 2020 Monthly Challenge--Emergency Type Doughs
« Reply #4 on: November 07, 2020, 02:04:58 PM »
spacelooper,

You did a super job with your same day dough. And it looks like you were able to make a credible Chicago deep dish pizza within that time frame.

Peter

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Offline amolapizza

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Re: November 2020 Monthly Challenge--Emergency Type Doughs
« Reply #5 on: November 08, 2020, 09:26:44 AM »
Here's my first submission.

I've done both 32-48 hours RT fermentation as well as same day fermentation, but so far staid away from multiple day fridge fermentation as I have a small fridge that always seems to be full.  I very often chose an 8-12 hour fermentation as I like to be able to decide in the morning that I'll eat pizza in the evening.  I don't feel that the quality change is all that great even though I think that a longer fermentation does slightly improve the taste.

This time I made Tonda Romana, an Italian style that is thin and crispy/crunchy.  It was planned for 8 (1+7) hours at 20C, but it turned into 9-10 hours in total.  180g dough balls extended by hand to around 28-31cm and baked at around 320C for about 3.5 minutes in my p134h electrical oven.

More details about the recipe and bake in my Tonda Romana thread: https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=59433.msg646885#msg646885
Jack

Effeuno P134H (500C), Biscotto Fornace Saputo, Sunmix Sun6, Caputo Pizzeria, Caputo Saccorosso, Mutti Pelati.

Offline Bert

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Re: November 2020 Monthly Challenge--Emergency Type Doughs
« Reply #6 on: November 08, 2020, 03:39:17 PM »
Dough was fermented at 74F, for 5 hours, hand mixed, 4 to 5 slap z and fold during  the first 2 hours. Intended for an 18” pizza, but it ended up 17”, it shrank while transferring to an 18” version of the Mighty Pizza Stone on my gas grill, cooked for about 7 minutes with the stone temperature around 600 F

KABF Weight (g): 383.10
Water Weight (g): 241.35
Yeast Weight (g) : 0.64
Salt Weight (g): 9.58
Oil Weight (g): 7.66
Sugar / LDM Weight (g): 7.66

Total Weight (g): 650
« Last Edit: November 08, 2020, 03:44:40 PM by Bert »
Bert

Offline Pizza_Not_War

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Re: November 2020 Monthly Challenge--Emergency Type Doughs
« Reply #7 on: November 08, 2020, 03:52:37 PM »
Dough was fermented at 74F, for 5 hours, hand mixed, 4 to 5 slap z and fold during  the first 2 hours. Intended for an 18” pizza, but it ended up 17”, it shrank while transferring to an 18” version of the Mighty Pizza Stone on my gas grill, cooked for about 7 minutes with the stone temperature around 600 F

KABF Weight (g): 383.10
Water Weight (g): 241.35
Yeast Weight (g) : 0.64
Salt Weight (g): 9.58
Oil Weight (g): 7.66
Sugar / LDM Weight (g): 7.66

Total Weight (g): 650
Pizza looks great. Didn't know you had an 18" version. Didn't see it on your site.

Offline Basquerider

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Re: November 2020 Monthly Challenge--Emergency Type Doughs
« Reply #8 on: November 08, 2020, 04:03:23 PM »
Same day dough!  Mozzarella, fresh tomatoes, Margarita pepperoni, jalapeños.  Post bake ricotta and Mikes hot honey.  Steel at 525 degrees.
« Last Edit: November 09, 2020, 01:14:02 PM by Pete-zza »

Offline Bert

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Re: November 2020 Monthly Challenge--Emergency Type Doughs
« Reply #9 on: November 08, 2020, 04:10:51 PM »
Pizza looks great. Didn't know you had an 18" version. Didn't see it on your site.

Thank you, it is just a prototype for my own use.
Bert

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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: November 2020 Monthly Challenge--Emergency Type Doughs
« Reply #10 on: November 08, 2020, 04:31:45 PM »
Dough was fermented at 74F, for 5 hours, hand mixed, 4 to 5 slap z and fold during  the first 2 hours. Intended for an 18” pizza, but it ended up 17”, it shrank while transferring to an 18” version of the Mighty Pizza Stone on my gas grill, cooked for about 7 minutes with the stone temperature around 600 F

KABF Weight (g): 383.10
Water Weight (g): 241.35
Yeast Weight (g) : 0.64
Salt Weight (g): 9.58
Oil Weight (g): 7.66
Sugar / LDM Weight (g): 7.66

Total Weight (g): 650

Beautiful pizza!
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, baker's yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
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Offline HansB

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Re: November 2020 Monthly Challenge--Emergency Type Doughs
« Reply #11 on: November 08, 2020, 05:25:09 PM »
I ran across some Provel recently and figured this thread was a good time to try it. There seems to be only one recipe on the internet: https://www.cookingforkeeps.com/copycat-imos-st-louis-style-pizza-yeast-rest-crust/

The crust itself was actually not bad for something you can mix, roll out, and immediately bake. But the Provel, as I've read for years, truly is an acquired taste, to say the least! Both the flavor and texture of the "cheese" were not something that I want to experience again.

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Offline Peter B

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Re: November 2020 Monthly Challenge--Emergency Type Doughs
« Reply #12 on: November 09, 2020, 12:48:27 PM »
This month's Challenge pertains to emergency type doughs. Such doughs are typically made and used same-day to make pizzas in just a matter of hours. In my past research, I saw that such doughs are typically made and used within only a few hours, typically under four hours. However, for purposes of this challenge, an "emergency" type dough made and used same day up to about five to eight hours is fine. I would rather strive for a higher quality end product.

Peter

I am new to the challenges as of last month, which was specifically NY style.  Just to be clear, this challenge is not specific to a style (Chicago, Neapolitan, etc.) - correct? The challenge is just based on the prep time for the dough?  I am looking at a Sicilian style recipe that appears to only require 2 hours rest after mixing.

The Broz
I said to my little one, "come here so I can change you".
He said "change only comes from within".  :-/

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: November 2020 Monthly Challenge--Emergency Type Doughs
« Reply #13 on: November 09, 2020, 01:12:50 PM »
I am new to the challenges as of last month, which was specifically NY style.  Just to be clear, this challenge is not specific to a style (Chicago, Neapolitan, etc.) - correct? The challenge is just based on the prep time for the dough?  I am looking at a Sicilian style recipe that appears to only require 2 hours rest after mixing.

The Broz
The Broz,

You are correct. The style can be any style so long as the dough falls within the same-day window.

Peter

Offline Yael

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Re: November 2020 Monthly Challenge--Emergency Type Doughs
« Reply #14 on: November 10, 2020, 08:03:56 AM »
Here's my contribution!

My idea was to make an emergency dough using an emergency preferment like the one in this relatively old video at the end of my post. I made a poolish.
I made 2 styles: one pan, one classic.

GMBF Flour 100% (60% poolish) (total flour 300g)
Hydra 60% (all in the poolish)
IDY 1%
Salt 2.5%
Dry sourdough for the flavor 3%
EVOO 3%

RT: 29.8°C

Parenthesis: I don't understand why my GMBF is 10% protein, whereas sometimes it's 13%?  ??? (3g protein per 30g VS 4g per 30g)

I made the poolish (RT water, flour, all the yeast) and after 1 hour 20 min it seemed to be ok.
Then I mixed as usual, 4 min with my stand mixer, FDT: 29.8°C.

Rest 10 min and fold. A longer mixing would have been better, but it was already too late.

One put on the pan, the other one balled, 2x250g (pan is 10' I think).
1H after, I parbaked the pan pizza (250°C), 10 min with sauce + 2nd bake 8 min.
Then the classic pizza was baked at 300~350°C 1.5H after balled, total +/- 7 min bake.

Result and thoughts: the pan pizza was better (dough was lighter), a little bit focaccia-like.
Classic pizza was hard to stretch, too much strength.
I couldn't taste the dry SD, I guess yeast overwhelmed.
It's been 2H and my stomach still feels heavy  :-[
Reminded me the kind of pizza I was making before!

« Last Edit: November 10, 2020, 08:07:08 AM by Yael »
“Learn the rules like a pro so you can break them like an artist” - Pablo Picasso

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Offline Yael

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Re: November 2020 Monthly Challenge--Emergency Type Doughs
« Reply #15 on: November 10, 2020, 08:05:13 AM »
... and the "classic" one (with the flour's pic):
“Learn the rules like a pro so you can break them like an artist” - Pablo Picasso

Offline erickso1

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Re: November 2020 Monthly Challenge--Emergency Type Doughs
« Reply #16 on: November 13, 2020, 06:57:00 PM »
This was a 6hr dough.  Been a couple months since I’ve made pizza.  Tasted good!

Half pineapple, olives, sausage for kids, half sausage ricotta for adults.  Baked at 500.  Bottom could have been a little crispier, so I'll likely go back up to 525 or 550 for next bake. 



« Last Edit: November 13, 2020, 06:59:49 PM by erickso1 »

Offline Peter B

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Re: November 2020 Monthly Challenge--Emergency Type Doughs
« Reply #17 on: November 14, 2020, 11:03:57 AM »
Here is my effort - based on the recipe and video posted here: http://orsararecipes.net/sicilian-pizza-topped-with-tomatoes-and-onions
The dough rested at RT for 2 hours after mixing, and was very inflated when I went to spread it in the pan.

The main adjustments I made to the recipe were:
  • There is no reference to the size of pan he uses.  Online the biggest square pans I could find were 10"x10".  I have a 10x13" pan, so I upped the dough recipe for the larger pan.  I am not good at stretching Sicilian dough anyway, so I would rather have too much.
  • I added some grated Grana and the oil from the anchovy can to the bread crumbs, before adding to the top.
  • The underside of the pizza had zero color on it and appeared to be steamy when I went to put it on a cooling rack.  I usually keep my pizza stone in the oven for the purpose of balancing out the heat in the box.  So since there was already a preheated stone in there, I moved the pizza to the stone for a few minutes.  I got a little color, and it certainly dried it out a bit.  Obviously nowhere near the crunchy crust of the Sicilians I have made or eaten over the years.

The results in the video appear to be extremely bready, with some stuff on top and that is exactly what my results were.  Having said that - I could see using this as a quick bread recipe for our baby son to eat, and to just have as a meal accompaniment (in other words, just baking it as bread and leaving out the toppings).  I made some focaccia last week and used it to make some awesome Italian style sandwiches.  This bread would not have the same texture, but it would be way easier to do in a pinch.

The Broz
I said to my little one, "come here so I can change you".
He said "change only comes from within".  :-/

Offline amolapizza

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Re: November 2020 Monthly Challenge--Emergency Type Doughs
« Reply #18 on: November 14, 2020, 05:00:51 PM »
Another quick dough.  I forgot to time the dough but I think it was about 4 hours from starting to measure out the ingredients until it met the oven.  Maybe 5 hours in total before biting into it.  More details in this post: https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=63011.msg647711#msg647711
Jack

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Offline foreplease

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Re: November 2020 Monthly Challenge--Emergency Type Doughs
« Reply #19 on: November 15, 2020, 11:12:27 PM »
I just realized my pizzas from last Friday (11/13) qualify for this month’s challenge. However, I can’t take full credit as I had help from two grandsons ages 2 and 4.  ;D  We had a blast and they ate almost all of the small one between them - plus tortellini and some fruit.


4 hours from mixer to peel. BF 40%, Caputo Red 60%, water 60 @ 90°, salt 2%, IDY 0.35%, veg oil 2%, sugar 1%. Intentionally mixed 5 minutes, which is 3 - 3 1/2 min longer than I normally go.


Sclafani crushed run through food mill, white cheddar and whole milk mozzarella. I may never go back to PS after having this several times in the past few months. Added pepperoni to the one for my wife and me. After posting in the daily thread I noticed the ‘topping migration.’

-Tony

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