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  • #1 by 62veedub on 08 Jun 2021
  • Ok guys and girls, I could use a little direction. Been a fan of pizza since I can remember and been looking forward to making my own for the last couple of years. My fiancť gave me a Bertello oven for my birthday. I also broke my foot about 6 weeks ago, so everything I do is either on hold or takes twice as long to do.

    I would like to start out and make a handful of pizzas the first time just to break in the oven. I was thinking store bought dough and sauce. I know itís is probably a big no-no, but I think it would be easiest for the first time?

    Iíve done so much reading over the last week, Iíll admit I feel a little intimidated!

    Please let me know where to start.  Any advice is appreciated!
  • #2 by billg on 08 Jun 2021
  • Ok guys and girls, I could use a little direction. Been a fan of pizza since I can remember and been looking forward to making my own for the last couple of years. My fiancť gave me a Bertello oven for my birthday. I also broke my foot about 6 weeks ago, so everything I do is either on hold or takes twice as long to do.

    I would like to start out and make a handful of pizzas the first time just to break in the oven. I was thinking store bought dough and sauce. I know itís is probably a big no-no, but I think it would be easiest for the first time?

    Iíve done so much reading over the last week, Iíll admit I feel a little intimidated!

    Please let me know where to start.  Any advice is appreciated!

    Not knowing your skill level and what temps you want to bake at I put together a quick recipe for a Ny Style pie to bake around 625-650F.  Since you hurt your foot I thought it may be easier to manage the oven with a cooler bake.  This recipe will yield 6 dough balls at 265 grams each:

    953.63 grams All Purpose flour
    591.3 grams of water
    0.30 grams of Active dry Yeast (ADY)
    25.75 grams Fine sea Salt
    19.07 grams of olive oil

    Once you make the dough, let it sit at room temp ( I figured 70f for this recipe) for 12 hours in bulk, then divide into 6-265 gram balls and let them rest for another 12 hours.  The dough should come out great.  I just gave the same recipe to my brother the other day and he said it came out fantastic and he's never made pizza before.  This is just a rough guide but will be better than store bought dough ;D.  Good luck!!!!!!

  • #3 by Peter B on 09 Jun 2021
  • I would throw in a few items here:
    - I am going to latch on to BillG's guess that your skill level is beginner.  He is wise to suggest small dough balls, as they are easier to stretch out and manage as a newbie.
    - I would err on the side on stretching the dough too thick, rather than too thin.  Too thin can result in a tear and a mess, whereas too thick just results in "I wish it was thinner", which you can work up to with practice.
    - Not knowing your location - if you have a GFS near you and can get a can of Don Pepino pizza sauce, that will be a simple item to start with.  Here, a 14oz can costs about $2.  Just open and use.
    - Speaking of sauce, use slightly less than you think you need to start with.  You can always adjust your next pies.  I would make the same suggestion for cheese.
    - Practice your launching with something before trying a pizza (look around for videos and previous advice on this board).  You'll get the hang of it quickly.  But a bad launch can be a disaster, and it may turn you off from pizza making.
    - Super important-be willing to learn from your mistakes!  Try not to get too frustrated when something goes wrong, but make a mental note of what happened and how you can change it.  Pizza making is not difficult, but it does take practice to get good.  Enjoy the journey.  Even the biggest disaster is reasonably tasty as long as it isn't burnt, all over the floor of your oven, etc.
    - Consider getting The Pizza Bible and The Elements of Pizza from the library, and reading through the techniques.  The latter has very easy recipes, and the former has some wonderful detail for a beginner.

    Hope this helps!

    The Broz
  • #4 by 62veedub on 09 Jun 2021
  • Thank you both! This does help tremendously. I am definitely a beginner but looking forward to trying different things once I get started.

    One of my big passions is smoking meat. Iíve smoked some stuff that shouldnít have been consumed by people! But, now my ribs, chicken, and roasts are top notch.

    Best part of trial and error is tasting and adjusting! Thanks again!
  • #5 by Pete-zza on 09 Jun 2021
  • 62veedub,

    Not to take away from what the other members have suggested, you might take a look at the following post that I wrote specifically for new pizza makers, hence the high degree of detail.

    Reply 8 at https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=2223.msg19563#msg19563

    If I were to add to the above post, it would be to suggest that the dough storage container holding the dough ball be left uncovered in the refrigerator for about an hour or so, to cool the dough ball faster, and then covered after that period.

    You might also find other things of value to you as a beginner in the same thread as the above post.

    Good luck.

    Peter
  • #6 by Jon in Albany on 10 Jun 2021
  • Buy a scale, maybe two scales if you want to weigh yeast very accurately. Also, keep in mind experience helps. You'll get better with handling the dough, learning how to best use your oven and dialing everything in with time.
  • #7 by Bbqguy on 10 Jun 2021
  • 62veedub,

    Not to take away from what the other members have suggested, you might take a look at the following post that I wrote specifically for new pizza makers, hence the high degree of detail.

    Reply 8 at https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=2223.msg19563#msg19563

    If I were to add to the above post, it would be to suggest that the dough storage container holding the dough ball be left uncovered in the refrigerator for about an hour or so, to cool the dough ball faster, and then covered after that period.

    You might also find other things of value to you as a beginner in the same thread as the above post.

    Good luck.

    Peter

    This is a great tip. Tom Lehman had made the same recommendation to me.
  • #8 by 9slicePie on 10 Jun 2021
  • If I were to add to the above post, it would be to suggest that the dough storage container holding the dough ball be left uncovered in the refrigerator for about an hour or so, to cool the dough ball faster, and then covered after that period.
    Wouldn't leaving the dough ball uncovered result in a skin forming around the dough ball?  (clearly not since you're recommending it, but I wanted to ask anyway)  ;D
  • #9 by Pete-zza on 10 Jun 2021
  • Wouldn't leaving the dough ball uncovered result in a skin forming around the dough ball?  (clearly not since you're recommending it, but I wanted to ask anyway)  ;D
    9slicePie,

    You caught me this time ;D. Tom recommended that the tops of the dough balls be lightly oiled after putting them into their storage containers. See, for example, Reply 2 at:

    https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=59284.msg594658;topicseen#msg594658

    To what I posted earlier, I would encourage beginners to use weights rather than volume measurements if they plan to be serious enough to commit funds to purchase scales and the like.

    Peter
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