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Author Topic: Dough formulation with Mexican flour  (Read 606 times)

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Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Dough formulation with Mexican flour
« Reply #20 on: November 13, 2017, 01:19:18 PM »
Problem solved with the oven and learning curve!
Looks like all you need to do now is to keep practicing your techniques and working to maintain consistency in time an d temperature controls...that's a good place to be as it appears that you have all the hard stuff behind you now. :)
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline Dangerous Salumi

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Re: Dough formulation with Mexican flour
« Reply #21 on: November 13, 2017, 08:43:49 PM »
Those are some good looking pies
Have a Dangerous day!


“They say that competitive eating is the battleground upon which God and Lucifer wage war for mens souls my friends, and they are right.”  - George Shea, Chairman, Major League Eating

Offline LuisInfante

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Re: Dough formulation with Mexican flour
« Reply #22 on: November 13, 2017, 10:38:02 PM »
Those are some good looking pies

Thank you very much for your compliment.

Luis Infante

Offline LuisInfante

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Re: Dough formulation with Mexican flour
« Reply #23 on: November 15, 2017, 09:42:49 PM »
Problem solved with the oven and learning curve!
Looks like all you need to do now is to keep practicing your techniques and working to maintain consistency in time an d temperature controls...that's a good place to be as it appears that you have all the hard stuff behind you now. :)
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Tom, hope you are doing great!

Regarding dessert options, one day I tried to make cinnamon rolls using the pizza dough, I opened the dough with a rolling pin to a rectangular shape, then I spread melted butter and covered the dough with brown sugar and powdered cinnamon, then I baked the roles in a baking pan in my deck oven at 200°C for 30 minutes, then I covered them with milk-sugar icing, the flavor was good, but the they came out tough, I probably extended the dough to thin… not sure…

The question is, would you share a recipe and procedure to make cinnamon rolls using pizza dough?

Again, thank you very much for your support!

See the attached pictures, raw and finished, they look nice in the picture, flavor was not bad, texture was tough, the next morning we microwaved them for 10-15 seconds and they were “acceptable” but less than ideal.

Best Regards from Mexico
Luis Infante
« Last Edit: November 15, 2017, 09:47:10 PM by LuisInfante »

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Dough formulation with Mexican flour
« Reply #24 on: November 15, 2017, 10:31:46 PM »
After you rolled the dough and cut it into individual pieces and panned the dough pieces how long did you allow the dough to proof (rise) for before baking?
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

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Offline LuisInfante

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Re: Dough formulation with Mexican flour
« Reply #25 on: November 15, 2017, 10:34:14 PM »
After you rolled the dough and cut it into individual pieces and panned the dough pieces how long did you allow the dough to proof (rise) for before baking?
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

About 20 minutes. I rolled the dough just after comming out of the fridge.

Luis Infante

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Dough formulation with Mexican flour
« Reply #26 on: November 16, 2017, 01:40:21 AM »
Lets talk about making some procedural changes before changing dough formulation.
1) Allow the dough to warm to 60F (internal ball temperature) before beginning to open the ball into a rectangle.
2) After rolling and cutting into individual rolls allow the dough to final proof (rise) for 45 to 60-minutes (be sure to allow enough space between the individual rolls on the pan).
3) After final proofing, brush the rolls with melted butter.
4) Bake at 375 (not more than 400F) until lightly browned.
5) Brush baked rolls with melted butter as soon as they are removed from the oven.
6) Allow to cool for 15-minutes and apply a powdered sugar-water icing, make it thick so it can be applied much like creamy peanut butter.

If the rolls are still too tough after this you have two options, 1) increase the fat content of the dough to at least 15% or 2) Change to a lower protein content flour.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline LuisInfante

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Re: Dough formulation with Mexican flour
« Reply #27 on: November 16, 2017, 09:26:45 AM »
Lets talk about making some procedural changes before changing dough formulation.
1) Allow the dough to warm to 60F (internal ball temperature) before beginning to open the ball into a rectangle.
2) After rolling and cutting into individual rolls allow the dough to final proof (rise) for 45 to 60-minutes (be sure to allow enough space between the individual rolls on the pan).
3) After final proofing, brush the rolls with melted butter.
4) Bake at 375 (not more than 400F) until lightly browned.
5) Brush baked rolls with melted butter as soon as they are removed from the oven.
6) Allow to cool for 15-minutes and apply a powdered sugar-water icing, make it thick so it can be applied much like creamy peanut butter.

If the rolls are still too tough after this you have two options, 1) increase the fat content of the dough to at least 15% or 2) Change to a lower protein content flour.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Tom, thank you very much!!, I will try this procedure for sure and post the results next week. regarding point 4).. what would be the estimated baking time? this is just to have a reference, last time I baked them 30 minutes.

Luis Infante

Luis Infante

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Dough formulation with Mexican flour
« Reply #28 on: November 16, 2017, 03:07:20 PM »
About 20-minutes.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline LuisInfante

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Re: Dough formulation with Mexican flour
« Reply #29 on: November 21, 2017, 09:45:11 PM »
About 20-minutes.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Hi Tom, I hope you are doing great!

Thank you for the cinnamon rolls procedure that you shared with me last week, I tried that and I got better results than last time, the people that tasted them liked them, next time I will add more butter, I think they lacked a little butter and more cinnamon, but definitely I got better results this time. (see the pictures below)
Also, I made pizzas again, this time I tried 48 hr fermentation for the first time, it was a big difference vs 24 hr fermentation, I used 0.6% fresh yeast and 1% sugar for browning, I also purchased another thermometer, this is a FLUKE 566 that I got used in a pawnshop, however I compared the reading with a calibrated thermometer that I have at work and it was calibrated. I measured my home fridge temp and it runs at 36-38°F , I baked at 560-575°F, the people liked the pizza and I also think it was better this time. (see the pictures below)

I still have one think I would like to solve, maybe this is normal but I got some bubbles on the dough, I just pop them, but sometimes the bubbles are in the middle of the dough ball and I’m afraid of getting a hole in the pizza at that point while baking. I took the balls out of the fridge and let them warm at room temp, which was at 72°F for about 1 hr, the balls temp was 62-64°F, I had less bubbling with a ball that only warmed to 52-54°F, is this what I should do? Or should I learn how to live with the bubbles?

Thanks again for all your support!
Luis Infante

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Offline LuisInfante

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Re: Dough formulation with Mexican flour
« Reply #30 on: November 21, 2017, 09:50:28 PM »
Slice of a margarita that I made this weekend, as you can see there is a black bubble, everything else was good. I don't have pictures of the pizza skin prior baking, I was in a hurry to make the pizzas this weekend so it was impossible to take pictures.

the pizza was crispy

Best Regards,
Luis Infante

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Dough formulation with Mexican flour
« Reply #31 on: Yesterday at 01:19:35 AM »
Luis;
Those cinnamon rolls are really looking good!  :chef:
The next time you make them, after the dough is rolled, use the heel of your hand to press the end of the curl into the body of the roll, this will give you a seam which should pretty well stay closed which will get rid of the "pig tail" on each of the individual rolls.
As for the bubbles, my advice is to make yourself a simple bubble popper, a piece of stainless steel rod or aluminum rod between 3/16 and 1/4-inch in diameter, bend a 90-degree angle on one end so the short leg of the angle is about 1 to 1.5-inches long, put a point on this as it will be the "bubble popper" trim the other end so it is long enough to reach into the far reaches of your oven and fashion a handle for the rod, now you have a bubble popper, most pizzerias have one. Those pizzas are looking GREAT!  :chef:
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

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