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Author Topic: Bread Improver for pizza  (Read 213 times)

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Offline pizza peran

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  • Location: india
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Bread Improver for pizza
« on: June 18, 2021, 01:22:51 AM »
Hi all,
        i would like to know is bread improver is important in commercial production of pizza if so how to identify correct bread improver according to my region and temperature.
Thanks

Offline Numerator

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Re: Bread Improver for pizza
« Reply #1 on: June 18, 2021, 11:49:21 AM »
Well, let's pick it apart;
The "improver" is intended for bread (in which the dough is managed very differently that the way we manage pizza dough). The amylase is hydrolizing a portion of the starch in the flour thus releasing the water it is holding while creating sugar at the same time, this is why the dough is becoming softer and tacky or possibly a little sticky, especially after a couple of days.The ascorbic acid is a moderately fast oxidizing agent in the dough which helps to reduce initial stickiness and the DATEM is there to enhance the oven spring properties of the dough. The dough softening due to hydrolizing of the wheat starch continues over several days (even under refrigeration but at a slower rate than at room temperature) so this is why you see the dough becoming progressively softer with time.
As for #2, this might be nothing more than drying of the dough...what is the temperature of the dough when you are rolling it out?
#3 would be using the improver more along the lines for which it is designed to be used (within about 6-hours of mixing), if you leave it ferment at room temperature until the following day the dough "could" become so soft as to be unusable. A lot woyld depend upon how your flour holds up as well as the finished dough temperature (temperature after mixing).
My feelings on using this "improver" are that it is probably a waste of money and as far as performance is concerned you are probably not getting much, if any, benefit from using it. With that said, if you want to use the dough within the same day that it is made you will probably see some benefit from the improver since that is the type of dough system that it is designed to be used in. As far as flavor is concerned you aren't getting any benefit from it at all. You're going to find that you get the biggest "bang for your buck" flavor wise through fermentation and temperature control (dough management). Within reason, the longer the dough is allowed to ferment the more flavor you will notice in the finished crust BUT you MUST be able to control the dough temperature throughout the process (effective dough management) or your crust flavor will be all over the board (inconsistent) as will the handling properties of the dough.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor
Dough Fermentation Tool
http://www.shadergraphics.com

Offline pizza peran

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  • Location: india
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Re: Bread Improver for pizza
« Reply #2 on: June 25, 2021, 01:10:41 PM »
First of all i thank you for your reply, so you were suggesting improver will be waste of time and money.
 ok these certain things i like to share with you
1. my kitchen temperature is 30c not controlled
2. for 1kg all purpose flour i use (30 gm sugar, 30gm salt and 10gm instant dry yeast, 100 ml vegetable oil, 650ml water)
3. my fermentation time is around 2 hours and more but if i add 30 gms yeast it comes to 45 min.
4. recently i tried using improver 15gm to above

if i need to follow without improver do i need any ingredient change to get soft and nice texture pizza dough ??

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