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Author Topic: Do I need a certain type of flour (or recipe alteration) for lasting crispness?  (Read 592 times)

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Offline elohel

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Hey all,

I recently had some pizza that blew me away with how crispy the crust was (De Lorenzo's), even like 30 minutes after the pie was made.

I did some research and found a recipe clone on here that was as follows (credit to Pete-zza):

Pillsbury Best Bakers Patent Flour (100%):
Water (56%):
IDY (0.12%):
Salt (1.5%):
Olive Oil (0.20%):
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (0.80%):

I followed this recipe as written other than not having that type of flour. Instead I used King Arthur's bread flour.

Overall, excellent crust and I really enjoyed it. My only complaint, and this is true of every pizza I make, is that the crispness of the crust only lasts for a few minutes out of the oven. If I grab a slice right away, it's exceptional. If I wait even 10 minutes to eat, it's not nearly as good.

Are there certain flours that retain crispiness better than others? Or any other add-ins I can alter my recipes with to help them stand up to time a little better? Or do I just need to accept that I need to eat molten pizzas straight out of the oven?

Thanks

Offline foreplease

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If you are not placing your pizza on a wire cooling rack right out of the oven, that would be the easiest and cheapest thing to try first. Many people place hot pizzas on room temperature “cutter pans.” This can cause soggy bottom crusts while the pizza steams of. Good luck!
-Tony

Offline rascali

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If you want your best chance at crisp, you should be cooking on steel.

Online Pizza_Not_War

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Time and temperature is a big factor in crispy crust.

Offline Cardellino

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Slip your second slice back onto the hot steel or stone with oven off. Do watch the time if you don’t want it too crispy.

Enjoy

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Offline scott r

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If you want your best chance at crisp, you should be cooking on steel.

Im surprised at this.  Im not an expert on steels, but I do own one and use it from time to time.   For me the steel is a way to speed up the bake and therefore produces a less crispy crust than a stone which gives me a slower bake at the same temperature.  In pizza making a slower bake will yield a more crispy crust with all other variables the same.

Removing the oil and turning down the oven temp will help to get your pizza more crispy, but you also could be over mixing or under/over proofing which would all give you less crisp. 

Offline jsaras

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If you want your best chance at crisp, you should be cooking on steel.
Higher temps/faster bakes generally result in more tender crusts
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Offline texmex

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You want a pleasantly crisp base? I suggest a Fazzari 5 fold or 3 fold or typically re-balled CF dough. Eggshell crunch and tender bite at the same time. It's been awhile but I recall many of us searching for the crisp rather than the crunch and finding it. I just found one of my recipe cards for Fazzari style and will make a batch this week.
https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=36684.msg365066#msg365066
« Last Edit: April 24, 2022, 02:52:30 PM by texmex »
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