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  • #1 by FoodSim on 19 May 2022
  • Red November's Detroit Style - Servius

    Dough

    1.00000 [212.00 g] flour blend (12.6482% protein)
    0.74100 [157.09 g] King Arthur Bread (KABF)
    0.25900 [054.91 g] Caputo Semola Di Grano Duro

    0.64800 [137.38 g] water
    0.01414 [003.00 g] granulated sugar
    0.02000 [004.24 g] kosher salt
    0.01618 [003.43 g] extra virgin olive oil (EVOO)
    0.00480 [001.02 g] active dry yeast (ADY)

    1.70312 [361.06 g] total

    The target thickness factor is 3.5 g/in^2 or 0.1235 oz/in^2. After kneading and shedding residue, the weight was 357 g. After fermenting and proofing, the weight was 350 g, achieving the target thickness for a 10"10" pan.

    The dough temperature during kneading was 86F (30C). The ambient temperature during fermentation and proofing was 77F (25C).

    Methods

    1. The ADY was bloomed in a 104F (40C) solution of water and sugar. Once the mixture reached 95F (35C), salt and oil were stirred in, and the mixture was added to the flour.
    2. The dough was kneaded for 7 minutes.

    The second post will include images from the fermentation stage.

    3. The dough was balled. 5.5 g of soybean oil was added to the bottom of a Pyrex 950 mL borosilicate glass bowl. The dough ball was placed in the bowl upside-down and spun around to coat the top of the ball with oil, then flipped upside-up. The bowl was sealed with its lid.
    4. The dough fermented for 90 minutes.
    5. The dough was reballed.
    6. The dough fermented for 60 minutes.

    The third and fourth posts will include images from the proofing and topping stages.

    7. A LloydPans 10"10"1.5" PSTK anodized aluminum pan was coated with 18 g of soybean oil. The dough was stretched to fill the bottom of the pan. The pan was covered.
    8. The dough proofed for 180 minutes.
    9. The pizza was topped with 179 g of sauce to within an average of 0.75" from the edge. (Normally I would use 145 g of sauce, but I wanted to use up the last of this sauce batch.) The sauce formula is posted at the following link:

    https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=73539.msg702709#msg702709

    10. The pizza was topped with 240 g of the following custom cheese blend:

    1.0000 [240.0 g] cheese blend
    0.6500 [156.0 g] low-moisture part-skim mozzarella
    0.2275 [054.6 g] Monterey Jack
    0.1225 [029.4 g] Colby

    11. The pizza was topped with 66 g of pepperoni, and 123 g of the following (parcooked) homemade mild sweet Italian sausage:

    1 lb ground pork (15% fat)
    2 tsp fennel seed
    1-1/2 tsp granulated sugar
    1-1/3 tsp kosher salt
    1/2 tsp basil
    1/2 tsp black pepper
    1/2 tsp oregano
    1/4 tsp garlic powder
    1/4 tsp parsley
    1/4 tsp paprika

    12. The pizza was baked in a preheated 550F (288C) oven for 8 minutes.

    Discussion

    The most critical component to the dough formula is the type of semolina flour and its ratio to the bread flour. I have used several semolina flours, but only the Caputo provides the proper balance of viscosity and elasticity. The dough texture is silky smooth, moldable, and stretchable to any desirable extent without requiring a super high hydration. The salt quantity and use of EVOO are the next most critical components. Adjustments to the sugar and ADY for a different fermentation schedule or temperature would be expected.

    The use of soybean oil for applications external to the dough are quite intentional. It has a higher smoke point than EVOO, producing fewer off flavors. I know that many prefer to use vegetable shortening to help secure the dough to the pan, but that's unnecessary with this dough. The dough simply stretches into place and remains there.

    The cheese blend is the result of much perturbation over the predominance of Colby in Colby-Jack cheese. I thought as long as I'm going to create a custom blend, I would create one with superior melt, coloration, and flavor characteristics. A more than suitable alternative to the custom Colby-Jack presented here is my favorite, Muenster, or Wisconsin's favorite, brick cheese. Though neither are as easy to procure as Colby and Monterey Jack, hence their use in this blend.

    I prefer sauce on the dough rather than on the toppings after the bake. That's the way I made Detroit Style pizzas at Little Caesars twenty-eight years ago, and that's the way I enjoy them now.

    In the same vein, most of the pizza I consumed at work was made with dough three hours after it was sheeted, because that's when it was to be discarded. So, of course, the proofing stage for this dough is three hours long for maximum production without overfermentation.

    In conclusion, this pizza is exceptional in that it has far more workable dough, as well as a greater texture and flavor than what I made then; and not just because Little Caesars is a low-cost fast-casual commercial food environment. Nostalgia exerts a powerful influence, and I often just wanted to make those same pizzas many times over the years. However, I wouldn't make a dedicated Detroit Style any other way than how I make Servius. It's what I would serve in my own restaurant.

    Footnote

    The final crumb image attached to this post is from an earlier bake. I decided to include it because it showed more of the crumb. The same dough from that bake was also used to make a pizza of a different shape altogether, seen posted at the following link:

    https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=21830.msg710980#msg710980

    One of these days I'll wait for the pizza to cool to ambient temperature before slicing it so more of the crumb throughout is visible without cheese cascading over it. In the meantime I'm going to enjoy my pizza while it's hot.
  • #2 by FoodSim on 19 May 2022
  • Fermentation

    1. Dough ball.
    2. Oiled dough ball in bowl at start of fermentation.
    3. Covered bowl.
    4. Dough after 90 minutes of fermentation.
    5. Reballed dough.
    6. Dough after 150 minutes of fermentation.
  • #3 by FoodSim on 19 May 2022
  • Proofing

    1. Oiled pan.
    2. Sheeted dough at start of proofing.
    3. Dough after 180 minutes of proofing.
  • #4 by FoodSim on 19 May 2022
  • #5 by FoodSim on 19 May 2022
  • Finally, if the need for extra sauce arises, it can always be dipped into or poured onto from the side.
  • #6 by Pizza-Face on 19 May 2022
  • So you own a restaurant, and therefore a commercial sheeter, and actually sheeted this dough before going into the pan, or is that just a figure of speech for stretching the dough into the pan?
  • #7 by FoodSim on 19 May 2022
  • So you own a restaurant, and therefore a commercial sheeter, and actually sheeted this dough before going into the pan, or is that just a figure of speech for stretching the dough into the pan?

    I do not own a restaurant. If I already owned a restaurant, I would already be serving this pizza, or I would announce adding it to the menu and invite everyone to come try it.

    The dough was stretched to fill the bottom of the pan.

    The process was manual stretching.

    By using the adjective "sheeted" in the images post, I'm describing the shape of the dough, not a process, because while "skinned" means a skin has formed, it isn't specifically the shape of the dough, it's what's on the surface of the dough. In fact, while I have used the term "skin" to describe the dough in its final form before, I'm largely uncomfortable with it for that very reason of ambiguity. I generally try to avoid forming a dough skin.

    We used mechanical sheeters at my long-ago job, but there was and is no way to avoid manually stretching a dough ball to fit a square pan. That's assuming you don't take a knife to it.
  • #8 by FoodSim on 03 Jun 2022
  • #9 by FoodSim on 10 Jun 2022
  • Using the Servius dough formula and a thickness of 3.191 g/in^2 (0.11256 oz/in^2), I made a couple of 9" round pan pizzas.
  • #10 by hammettjr on 10 Jun 2022
  • Very nice. Do you bake with the pan on a stone, or just directly on the oven rack?

  • #11 by FoodSim on 10 Jun 2022
  • Very nice. Do you bake with the pan on a stone, or just directly on the oven rack?

    When I bake with pans, it's not just because of the deeper crust style, it's also because I don't want to waste time and energy heating a stone. I only bake with a stone when I want a pizza to have stone-baked characteristics.

    Besides, with dark anodized aluminum pans the bottom already bakes faster than the top if I don't place the pan on a higher rack in the oven.

    I meant to mention that the 9" pizzas were baked at 550F for 7 minutes.
  • #12 by Heikjo on 11 Jun 2022
  • Looks incredible! Thanks for the detailed process and wonderful photos. I like these doughs with semolina, so I'm certainly going to try this one. Don't have a similar pan though, but I've been thinking about getting a Lloyd or something similar. Last I looked they weren't that easy to get hold of, and the total price quickly went from $40 to $120+. Edit: Amazon suggests it will only be $70, so maybe I'll have to order one.

    Looks crunchy without needing to par-bake. My pan pies often lacks a bit of crunch.
  • #13 by FoodSim on 11 Jun 2022
  • Looks incredible! Thanks for the detailed process and wonderful photos. I like these doughs with semolina, so I'm certainly going to try this one. Don't have a similar pan though, but I've been thinking about getting a Lloyd or something similar. Last I looked they weren't that easy to get hold of, and the total price quickly went from $40 to $120+. Edit: Amazon suggests it will only be $70, so maybe I'll have to order one.

    Looks crunchy without needing to par-bake. My pan pies often lacks a bit of crunch.

    Thank you.

    I have tried other semolina flours in the past, but the double-milled semolina is the only kind I have found to work as well as it does here.

    The pan I have was, and still is, just $38.15.

    LloydPans 10"x10"x1.5" Pan
    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07MHN2YTC/?tag=pmak-20

    I know many people prefer a traditionally larger and rectangular pan, but I don't need that much leftover pizza sitting around.
  • #14 by FoodSim on 22 Jun 2022
  • #15 by ButteredPizza on 27 Jun 2022
  • 11. The pizza was topped with 66 g of pepperoni, and 123 g of the following (parcooked) homemade mild sweet Italian sausage:

    1 lb ground pork (15% fat)
    2 tsp fennel seed
    1-1/2 tsp granulated sugar
    1-1/3 tsp kosher salt
    1/2 tsp basil
    1/2 tsp black pepper
    1/2 tsp oregano
    1/4 tsp garlic powder
    1/4 tsp parsley
    1/4 tsp paprika

    Tsk tsk.  You know what you must do.
  • #16 by FoodSim on 27 Jun 2022
  • Tsk tsk.  You know what you must do.

    Donate more to the American Heart Association?
  • #17 by elephant man on 28 Jun 2022
  • Thank You for the write up. Information here is in the top 5 of any post explaining pizza making details. I can't wait to try this recipe.
  • #18 by norma427 on 28 Jun 2022
  • Black Forest Ham & Pepperoni

    red.november,

    Beautiful Detroit pizza!  :chef:

    Norma
  • #19 by FoodSim on 29 Jun 2022
  • Thank You for the write up. Information here is in the top 5 of any post explaining pizza making details. I can't wait to try this recipe.

    I try to include as much relevant information as I would like to see in a dough formula or pizza recipe. I have also been on the forum long enough to have some idea of what people will ask me if I didn't include it in my initial post(s).

    I look forward to your evaluation.
  • #20 by FoodSim on 29 Jun 2022
  • red.november,

    Beautiful Detroit pizza!  :chef:

    Norma

    Thank you, Norma.
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