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1
General Pizza Making / Re: Post a Pic of Your Pie - Daily Update
« Last post by Swinger-mike on Today at 01:40:27 AM »
first Ny pies in 3 months.
2
Pizza Cheese / Re: New Grande Cheese
« Last post by Essen1 on Today at 01:24:36 AM »
Mike, thanks for the info on the Di Stefano.  I have been wanting to make a pie like Grimaldi but most the fresh moz is so wet and even if I try to dry it the best I can it doesn't melt right.  I hope I can find some of this cheese locally at a store or just as good they will sell to me at their business location which is in Pomona, CA.  I can buy on their website but I have to buy $49 worth for free shipping.  I don't live in Pomona but I so happen to work in Pomona at a hospital in Radiology.  I am fortunate that this place is near or close enough to my work but I don't know if they will sell from their factory to me and if there is some kind of minimum.

Call them and ask.

They may have, just like Central Milling here in Petaluma, an option to buy directly from them.

Or send them a message on Instagram. They've been very responsive to those, as well.
3
Other Types / Re: Vegan Dough?
« Last post by Timpanogos Slim on Today at 12:24:41 AM »
I believe human hair was traditionally the dominant precursor. I think now the majority is produced from various biotechnologies.

I am skeptical that human hair was ever the dominant precursor but would be willing to accept scholarly research on the subject.

I am skeptical because it is a much bigger hassle to collect human hair from barber shops than it is to collect animal hair from slaughterhouses. It's a matter of economies of scale of course. How many strip-mall hairdressers does it take to get the hair output from a single slaughterhouse processing hogs? This isn't nuanced math. There are markets for both the skin and the hair and believe it or not some of the market for pork prefers skin-on, but certainly without the hair.

The current producers of cystine who are willing to speak on the matter say that their precursor is hog hair. Consider that most of the production is in china, and china consumes a couple-three more times pork than the USA does.

Some years back, a japanese publication with a known anti-chinese bias published a scandalous story about chinese soy sauce being made from human hair - with associated grainy video of someone vaguely asian doing something with barrels of some sort of fibrous material.

At the time, a friend of mine was managing the 'magnet lab' at a major state university with a lot of industry and government contracts to run spectra analysis. He and his graduate assistant scoured the asian markets in their region for every brand of soy sauce they could find and characterized all of them.

And all of them were just different assortments of hydrolyzed proteins and amino acids, with no markers that would definitively indicate what the origin might have been.
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General Pizza Making / Re: Post a Pic of Your Pie - Daily Update
« Last post by Papa T on Today at 12:24:30 AM »
This is a follow up to my post on the 28th about using my hoagie roll dough recipe for pizza dough. Specifically for a NY style pizza.

Since a cheese pizza is the reference and gold standard for judging pizza, yesterday I made a 17 ounce, 485 gram, dough ball and did a CF for 24 hours. The dough uses the same hoagie roll recipe I posted a few days ago, this one is just larger for a 16 inch, 0.085 TF NY style pizza.

I have a friend who isn't really a pizza snob, but is pizza finicky. She's a Jersey girl and has had her fair share of slices from her home state, and also from Manhattan and Brooklyn. I invited her over for pizza last night to get her feedback.

I used my go-to method for baking round pies. Preheat the home oven to max (535F for me), with a stone on the bottom rack. I open then dough and place it on a Lloyd screen, top it, and into the oven. As soon as I close the oven door, I drop the temp to 475F. I shake the pizza off the screen to the stone at the 3.5 to 4 minute mark. At 6 or so minutes, I rotate it 180, and bake until its the color I desire. This one was a 12 minute total bake.

I came out of the oven looking on point. I let it cool a few minutes on a rack, then moved to a board to cut, then back on the rack. Jersey girl's expression on first bite was priceless. Her eyes got bigger, and she went back in for another chomp for a true mouthful.

Once able to talk, she said it was by far the best NY style pizza made at home she'd ever had. She said that if she had not seen me make it, she would have thought I had a pizza shop deliver it. (Of course, there's no NY style pizza shops around here, but I get her drift).

She added that it could hold it's own against many of the slice shops in Jersey and Manhattan, and while perhaps not the best NY slice she ever had, that's stricly a personal preference. She said nobody that likes NY slices would have a problem with a slice of this.

Using my 31 year old electric home oven, I'm pretty sure that this is as close as I'm going to landing a NY style pizza at home. It's been a long journey to get to this point, and then it was accidental, but I'll take it. I'm going to try one more tweak to the recipe to see how that lands, but if not the same or better, this is, will be, and remain my go-to NY style pizza dough and method for a home oven. Pizza party soon for more feedback.
5
Another in my occasional exploration of pizza here in my adopted city. ;)
Craig Melillo is owner/chef and recently moved from a successful food cart to brick and mortar shop in the cool St. John's neighborhood . Business is booming and Craig makes every pie himself.
While not vegan myself, I decided to try his vegan selection of the day. Bianco di Napoli tomatoes, wild arugula, eggplant confit, z'atar, Cairnspring T85, same day SD with rye starter. Craig noted 2- ish minutes in woodfired Forno Bravo.
Balance of ingredients was very good on this and other pies I saw going out.
Crust was substantial, nice chew but not tough at all. Rye starter was quite dominant, and set the flavor tone for the pie.
Fun shop with inventive toppings doing quite well in a most competitive market.
6
Neapolitan Style / Re: Outcomes with malt powder?
« Last post by Timpanogos Slim on Today at 12:07:12 AM »
Diastatic or not?

Dry malt extract is just maltose sugar and various impurities.

Diastatic malt powder has some amylase enzymes in it that will convert some of the starch in the flour to various sugars.

I guess in either case the end result is more sugar, thus more browning and more sweet flavor.

If diastatic, a longer ferment will increase it.
7
Pizza Cheese / Re: New Grande Cheese
« Last post by PizzaEater101 on Yesterday at 10:32:57 PM »
Mike, thanks for the info on the Di Stefano.  I have been wanting to make a pie like Grimaldi but most the fresh moz is so wet and even if I try to dry it the best I can it doesn't melt right.  I hope I can find some of this cheese locally at a store or just as good they will sell to me at their business location which is in Pomona, CA.  I can buy on their website but I have to buy $49 worth for free shipping.  I don't live in Pomona but I so happen to work in Pomona at a hospital in Radiology.  I am fortunate that this place is near or close enough to my work but I don't know if they will sell from their factory to me and if there is some kind of minimum.


8
Shop Talk / Re: Controlling house flies
« Last post by theppgcowboy on Yesterday at 10:27:38 PM »
If you have windows spray the seals with Tempo. If they are in the walls, spray the seams.
Or.......hire a cowboy, stand him in the corner or just off the food line.
9
Anytime I've been to MX, I pretty much l8ve on street food! 2 things have always stood out, the achiote grilled chicken and the roasted black chicken stuffed with hard-boiled eggs. Sooooo good!!!
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Shop Talk / Re: Food trailer question
« Last post by theppgcowboy on Yesterday at 10:17:59 PM »
I would try and get shore power to you trailer, the health department will want that. Take as much dough as you can to the event. If you need to make more, an extra person will be needed because after a full day of making pizza, you will be tired. When doing open air events you will figure out  what that is over time.

This is me, I do a wood fired operation and do not need 240volt, if you do you are competing for those few 240 volt outlets that all the other vendors have to have, or you need a large generator. Do not get me wrong you must have a generator because the event have no clue concerning the difference between 120 and 240, or AC vs DC electricity and you will need it to fall back on.
I would not freeze my dough.
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