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Author Topic: Difference between pan pizzas  (Read 1136 times)

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Offline georgedrickard

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Difference between pan pizzas
« on: July 29, 2021, 10:57:38 AM »
Hi guys,

Looking to expand my pizzas styles.

I've some knowledge already, but can someone tell me the difference between Sicilian, Detroit, Grandma, Roman al Taglio?

Example in their ingredients/toppings, proofing, raw/cooked sauce, hydration, thickness factor and cooking methods?

« Last Edit: July 29, 2021, 11:00:22 AM by georgedrickard »

Offline john_k

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Re: Difference between pan pizzas
« Reply #1 on: March 20, 2022, 06:49:08 PM »
Bump.
I am also interested in the answers people might give to this; more expert input would be appreciated.

My understanding:
Sicilian, Detroit, grandma comparison...
thicker to thinner crust: Sc > Det > grandma

sauce and cheese:
Detroit traditionally is sauced after cooking, and is characterized by melted carmelized cheese on the outer edge of the crust, with brick cheese being the traditional but not very cheaply attainable cheese. Muenster works for me.

Sicilian and Detroit doughs get more proofing in the pan before baking, i.e. more time to rise in the pan, than grandma.

Grandma sauce is rough and coarse, crushed tomato pieces kind of scattered and splotched over the top, with lots of garlic and spicing (relative to Sci and Det.) Detroit sauce is put on after the bake as 'racing stripes'.

I think the dough formulations might be essentially similar.


Offline Yael

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Re: Difference between pan pizzas
« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2022, 02:44:01 AM »
Sicilian, Detroit, grandma: all US styles. They're pretty similar as far as I understood them (dough rises in the pan; one has cheese before tomato; one has cheese to inside the edges...).

Al taglio/pizza in teglia/a la romana: Italian styles. As member Antilife replied to my question, I'd classify this way:
- pizza in teglia a la romana: high HR dough (75-80% and more) fermented and spread in the pan right before baking (no pan-proofing).
- pizza in teglia classica: pan-proofing, and lower HR dough (more like classic pizza, 60%).
- pizza pala: same process as teglia a la romana, but without baking pan (dough directly on the stone), slightly higher baking temp.

"Al taglio" means by the slice (literally the "cut"), and "in teglia" means on the pan (baking pan). "Pala" means peel (pizza peel).
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