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Offline Bobino414

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #880 on: January 07, 2018, 03:27:19 PM »
KitchenAid Superba KEBC247KSS03

I'm using the lower oven which does not have convection. A 16" stone or pan wont fit with the convention fan

You do have a bottom heating element hidden in the floor panel.

Offline hammettjr

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #881 on: January 07, 2018, 05:36:44 PM »
You do have a bottom heating element hidden in the floor panel.

I had no idea, thanks! Now I see this:

The CleanBake Hidden Element provides evenly balanced heat distribution resulting in better baking performance. Because it is “hidden” from view by the porcelain oven cavity, the baking element is protected from spills.
 
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Offline invertedisdead

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #882 on: January 12, 2018, 12:41:26 AM »
I'm a fan of a stone under the pan. I usually try and deck it directly on the stone at the end if possible.

Offline invertedisdead

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #883 on: January 12, 2018, 12:48:23 AM »
I had no idea, thanks! Now I see this:

The CleanBake Hidden Element provides evenly balanced heat distribution resulting in better baking performance. Because it is “hidden” from view by the porcelain oven cavity, the baking element is protected from spills.

That means you can put your stone directly on the floor  ;)

Offline norma427

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #884 on: January 12, 2018, 10:39:43 AM »
Cheesy.

Norma


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Offline enchant

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #885 on: January 12, 2018, 10:43:59 AM »
Norma, you're killin' me here. How do I eat my tuna sandwich for lunch now?
--pat--

Offline norma427

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #886 on: January 12, 2018, 11:33:18 AM »
Norma, you're killin' me here. How do I eat my tuna sandwich for lunch now?

Lol Pat, a tuna sandwich sounds good to me. 

This was a video I took at the end of the night of two pizzas baking.  The sounds of the cheese and bottom sizzling can be heard.  The thing with those two pizzas they weren't proofed enough.  Just wanted to do a test.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BdwRgdfBO_u/?taken-by=normaspizza

Norma

Offline enchant

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #887 on: January 12, 2018, 11:40:58 AM »
My goodness, that looks yummy.  I always like to have my pepperoni curl up and leave little pools of grease.  Yours really curl a LOT, even closing in on themselves somewhat.
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Offline invertedisdead

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #888 on: January 12, 2018, 01:08:37 PM »
Hmm Norma, something actually looks off on that pie. Can't quite put my finger on it, gonna need you to drop it in the mail and overnight it this way for proper analysis  ;D




BTW is that 100% cheddar, or a mozz:cheddar blend in the pic above?

Offline norma427

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #889 on: January 12, 2018, 09:29:10 PM »
Hmm Norma, something actually looks off on that pie. Can't quite put my finger on it, gonna need you to drop it in the mail and overnight it this way for proper analysis  ;D




BTW is that 100% cheddar, or a mozz:cheddar blend in the pic above?

Ryan,

Lol.  That is cheddar mozzarella blend with 3 hard cheeses. 

Norma

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Offline hammettjr

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #890 on: January 14, 2018, 10:17:09 PM »
I went with a stone in the oven tonight and it worked nicely, thanks all  :chef: I kept it simple, pan on a 485 degree stone with 460 degree oven for 15:30. Cooled for 4 minutes, no sign of steam/water residue on the cooling rack. Then sliced and eaten. It was a nice improvement to the undercrust. I'm curious how it'd turn out with the stone a bit hotter, and maybe more oil in the pan. I also achieved a cheese crust accidently, which was interesting, but not something I'd do intentionally.
Matt

Online mitchjg

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #891 on: January 24, 2018, 10:21:04 PM »
I posted a couple of pizzas in the Daily thread but thought a couple of aspects were worth mentioning and asking about, so please forgive the double post nature of some of this.

2 pizzas in Lloydpans - Bar/Greek Style.

- KABF, 60% H20, 4% olive oil, 2.25% salt, 0.4% IDY. 
- 0.075 thickness factor. 
- Cold fermented for 28 hours and then room temperature for 4 (last hour in the pan). 
- Baked them at 475-500 for about 13-14 minutes. 
- 50/50 mozzarella and cheddar on top, both dusted with pecorino romano and oregano post bake. 

One with pepperoni and mushrooms (14"), the other good old plain cheese (12")

I was able to reproduce a non-soggy, non-steamy bottom again on both pizzas, so I think I have the issues corrected now.  For the regular Lloydpan (a 14" diameter), I put a regular cordierite pizza stone (not my super conductive soapstone) on the bottom rack and preheated the oven to 530.  When I started the bake, I lowered the oven temp to a little over 475 (I think it was 485).  That extra initial heat was there to help zap the bottom.  With the oven door open to get the pizza in there, that was enough to end up with the oven temperature stabilized very quickly at the 475 + level.

It produced an even top/bottom bake and when I transferred the pizza to a rack, there was zero steam.

Similarly, the second pie (12") was launched without a stone on a rack higher up.  There was no need to use a stone because this pan is one of their perforated ones - no trapped steam to bake off.  Same deal, nice and even.

I did find that the second one, the perforated 12" gave me a somewhat crisper crunch all around - which I liked.  Not a really big difference, but it was noticeable. 

***********
I do not think I have seen a particular pattern in this thread, but I used 9 ounces of cheese on the 14" and 7 on the 12". It was 50/50 cheddar (Vermont sharp) and mozzarella.  We felt the cheese was "too strong."   I think I will use less cheese and up the mozzarella and lower the cheddar in the mix.

Do you guys think I have too much cheese compared to what you are using?  And, what about the cheddar/mozzarella ratio?

Thanks.

Pics below -

Mitch

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Offline jsaras

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #892 on: January 24, 2018, 10:52:53 PM »
Hmm.  I wonder if I should get a perforated pan for this style or maybe bake on an aluminum screen.
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Offline hammettjr

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #893 on: January 25, 2018, 07:17:23 AM »

***********
I do not think I have seen a particular pattern in this thread, but I used 9 ounces of cheese on the 14" and 7 on the 12". It was 50/50 cheddar (Vermont sharp) and mozzarella.  We felt the cheese was "too strong."   I think I will use less cheese and up the mozzarella and lower the cheddar in the mix.

Do you guys think I have too much cheese compared to what you are using?  And, what about the cheddar/mozzarella ratio?

Thanks.

Pics below -

Nice looking pies Mitch. Maybe I'm taking your words too literally, but you used quotations to say that the cheese was "too strong", which implies to me it's about the blend, not the amount.

It varies, but Greek pies can be very heavy on cheese. I use 18oz for 16". 9oz for 14" does not sound high at all.

Note, however that I'm referring to the regular Greek style, not bar, and I'm using a tf of 0.0975. (Although, despite your lower TF, your crust doesn't look super thin.)

I use 60% cheddar. I think it's common to use this amount or more, but the cheddar is mild. When I first baked a couple pies with cheddar I used maybe 25% of Cabot sharp low fat. When I learned that pizzerias were using a higher percentage of cheddar, I knew it had to be milder, and I switched to Cracker Barrel.

Last thought - is this your first time putting romano one one of these pies? I experimented with parm in the sauce previously and determined it's one flavor too many for me.
 
« Last Edit: January 25, 2018, 07:19:51 AM by hammettjr »
Matt

Online mitchjg

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #894 on: January 25, 2018, 10:29:03 AM »
Thanks Matt.

Yes, I was referring to flavor and not amount with the "strong" comment.  I think you may be right - the addition of the pecorino romano may have been a bridge too far.  I had previously, on occasion, used parm.  I think I am going to drop the pecorino and parm and also cut back on the cheddar next time - maybe 75/25 mozzarella/cheddar and see how it goes.
Mitch

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Online mitchjg

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #895 on: January 25, 2018, 10:32:35 AM »
Hmm.  I wonder if I should get a perforated pan for this style or maybe bake on an aluminum screen.

In case you buy, this is the one I got: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01FT8DVGC/?tag=pmak-20 .   I ordered via Amazon because I am a Prime member - Lloydpans charges for shipping and also Amazon is super fast.  However, this is the only size perforated pan on Amazon - of course,  the full array is on the Lloydpans site.
Mitch

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Offline hotsawce

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #896 on: January 27, 2018, 01:08:17 PM »
Has anyone tried par-baking a Greek pizza (as in this thread) or pan pizza (like Kenji’s cast iron pan pizza) dough? Can you still get some of that’s fried cheese edge on the pizza with the parbake?

Offline norma427

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #897 on: January 28, 2018, 08:16:59 AM »
I posted a couple of pizzas in the Daily thread but thought a couple of aspects were worth mentioning and asking about, so please forgive the double post nature of some of this.

I was able to reproduce a non-soggy, non-steamy bottom again on both pizzas, so I think I have the issues corrected now.  For the regular Lloydpan (a 14" diameter), I put a regular cordierite pizza stone (not my super conductive soapstone) on the bottom rack and preheated the oven to 530.  When I started the bake, I lowered the oven temp to a little over 475 (I think it was 485).  That extra initial heat was there to help zap the bottom.  With the oven door open to get the pizza in there, that was enough to end up with the oven temperature stabilized very quickly at the 475 + level.

It produced an even top/bottom bake and when I transferred the pizza to a rack, there was zero steam.

Similarly, the second pie (12") was launched without a stone on a rack higher up.  There was no need to use a stone because this pan is one of their perforated ones - no trapped steam to bake off.  Same deal, nice and even.

I did find that the second one, the perforated 12" gave me a somewhat crisper crunch all around - which I liked.  Not a really big difference, but it was noticeable. 

***********
I do not think I have seen a particular pattern in this thread, but I used 9 ounces of cheese on the 14" and 7 on the 12". It was 50/50 cheddar (Vermont sharp) and mozzarella.  We felt the cheese was "too strong."   I think I will use less cheese and up the mozzarella and lower the cheddar in the mix.

Do you guys think I have too much cheese compared to what you are using?  And, what about the cheddar/mozzarella ratio?

Thanks.

Pics below -

Great job on your pizzas Mitch!  :drool:

Norma

Offline hotsawce

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #898 on: January 30, 2018, 10:47:21 AM »
Norma,

What’s the brand of pan that you use? Do you ever get bad sucking on the sides withthe cheese pressed up against it?

Also, how much oil do you use in the pan? Do you have issues with the dough springing back, like with Sicilian pies?

I want to give this a shot - I’ve never had a Greek pizza; but I have a feeling it’ll fill my desire for a nostalgic pan pizza

Offline norma427

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Re: Greek pizza
« Reply #899 on: January 30, 2018, 09:50:47 PM »
Norma,

What’s the brand of pan that you use? Do you ever get bad sucking on the sides withthe cheese pressed up against it?

Also, how much oil do you use in the pan? Do you have issues with the dough springing back, like with Sicilian pies?

I want to give this a shot - I’ve never had a Greek pizza; but I have a feeling it’ll fill my desire for a nostalgic pan pizza

Lou,

I use Allied Steel Spinning “Black Buster” pans.  No sucking on the sides with the cheese pressed up against it.  Don't really press the cheese against the pan though.  Lightly drop the cheese around the edges.

Use Crisco Butter Flavor All-Vegetable Shortening to grease the pans.

No problems with the dough springing back.  Use the Detroit style dough and press out cold then proof.

Best of luck if you give this a try!

Norma

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