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Author Topic: Sclafani Crushed Yield After Milling  (Read 993 times)

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Offline foreplease

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Sclafani Crushed Yield After Milling
« on: October 02, 2021, 05:25:36 PM »
This is similar to Jon In Albanyís post about milling whole peeled.


https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=70739.msg683006#msg683006



I thought my yield after running Sclafani Crushed through my food mill might be helpful or interesting to someone. Photos show
1 waste
2 volume loss
3 weight loss (28 oz can)


I love the results of this and figured I may as well take a couple pictures and post it.

-Tony

Offline Jon in Albany

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Re: Sclafani Crushed Yield After Milling
« Reply #1 on: October 03, 2021, 05:58:09 PM »
Interesting, Tony. Hope you liked the tomatoes. For a while I was mixing milled and un-milled Tomato Magic and 7-11 for a thinner sauce consistency. Never tried it with Sclafini crushed. For those, I open a can, add some salt and start making stripes on a Detroit. I used to like Pastene Kitchen Ready crushed, but when compared to Stanislaus or Sclafani, I don't think the Pastene is the same league.

Offline foreplease

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Re: Sclafani Crushed Yield After Milling
« Reply #2 on: October 03, 2021, 08:02:46 PM »
Thanks, Jon, yes I like the tomatoes very much. I am nearly finished with my third case of them. The first few cans I used them as you described. Then I happened to be making a couple thin pizzas around the time there was some discussion in one of Mattís threads about thin sauces so I tired these tomatoes this way. Iíve used it as-is for the base of sauce for pasta a few times and liked it fine.


I really like some of the passata products. The glass jars are probably part of the reason. :chef: My wife does not like them too well and they are a pain to order and have shipped without something breaking.
-Tony

Offline RHawthorne

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Re: Sclafani Crushed Yield After Milling
« Reply #3 on: October 04, 2021, 12:32:44 AM »
So what would you say is the most noticeable improvement you get from this process? Do you think the tomatoes taste better after milling? Or is the main object to improve the body? Sorry if this sounds like a stupid question. I know it's a pretty commonly performed process, but I've never really heard anybody say exactly why they do it.
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Offline Jon in Albany

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Re: Sclafani Crushed Yield After Milling
« Reply #4 on: October 04, 2021, 07:54:58 AM »
Can't speak for Tony, but when I started using a food mill it was the change the consistency of the sauce. I don't recall ever milling a small can of crushed tomatoes, but when I first got access to Restaurant Depot I was buying #10 cans of 7-11 and then tomato magic. For the amount of pizza I was making, one of those cans was plenty with leftovers for a pasta dinner later in the week. I know a lot of pizza places mix #10 cans of different tomato products. I took a class at one pizza place and the base of their sauce was 1 can Saporito Filleto and 1 can 7-11 and about half a can of water split between the two cans to clean them out. So for a while I was using about 50/50 milled and straight crushed tomatoes. The mill even with the coarse disc still holds back a good amount of skin and core from Tomato Magic which surprised me. I thought the mill would just be a gentler blending.

When I switched to whole tomatoes, Alta Cucina, I was milling about half of the whole tomatoes and then eyeballing half the canning liquid. The leftover mix was milled into sauce later in the week. Also the base to an excellent summer gazpacho during the summer season.

Very recently I started only using the whole tomatoes and was surprised at how different the whole milled tomatoes vs milled tomatoes/packing liquid was. Like a different ingredient. In making a 10 or so wood fired pizzas by myself, I've found it difficult to to taste tests with "all other things being equal." So I haven't done a baked comparison of milled whole versus the combo. Using memory,  not exactly scientific, I think it is an improvement. I don't make what I would call a traditional NY style, more a NY style influenced.

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Offline foreplease

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Re: Sclafani Crushed Yield After Milling
« Reply #5 on: October 04, 2021, 09:09:38 PM »
So what would you say is the most noticeable improvement you get from this process? Do you think the tomatoes taste better after milling? Or is the main object to improve the body? Sorry if this sounds like a stupid question. I know it's a pretty commonly performed process, but I've never really heard anybody say exactly why they do it.
I like the texture (or the absence of texture) better. I donít know that they taste much different one way or the other. As my pizzas have improved I am liking simple, smooth, uncooked sauces more - but not exclusively. I notice it more on thinner pizza crusts than heavier ones. Not a stupid question at all!


EDIT: after reading Jonís post Iíll add that it is the skins being gone that is the improvement. I havenít noticed many seeds before milling or in the residue left behind but I am not someone who minds seeds.
« Last Edit: October 04, 2021, 09:15:56 PM by foreplease »
-Tony

Offline RHawthorne

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Re: Sclafani Crushed Yield After Milling
« Reply #6 on: October 04, 2021, 10:25:55 PM »
I like the texture (or the absence of texture) better. I donít know that they taste much different one way or the other. As my pizzas have improved I am liking simple, smooth, uncooked sauces more - but not exclusively. I notice it more on thinner pizza crusts than heavier ones. Not a stupid question at all!


EDIT: after reading Jonís post Iíll add that it is the skins being gone that is the improvement. I havenít noticed many seeds before milling or in the residue left behind but I am not someone who minds seeds.
I used to do cooked sauces sometimes when I first started getting serious about making pizza, but I've gone with uncooked sauces for a long time now, except when I use fresh tomatoes and I roast them in the oven. I really don't see the point in cooking canned tomatoes that have already been cooked. I think all it does is needlessly complicate the process.
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Offline Jersey Pie Boy

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Re: Sclafani Crushed Yield After Milling
« Reply #7 on: October 05, 2021, 03:22:55 AM »
Tony, looks good.. which disc are you using for the Sclafani crushed?

Offline foreplease

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Re: Sclafani Crushed Yield After Milling
« Reply #8 on: October 05, 2021, 12:26:11 PM »
Thanks, Bill. Mine has 2 discs and this is the one with the smaller holes. Thatís all I know. I donít think there are any markings on it.
-Tony

Offline Jersey Pie Boy

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Re: Sclafani Crushed Yield After Milling
« Reply #9 on: October 05, 2021, 01:43:59 PM »
Thanks Tony!

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Offline Santo

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Re: Sclafani Crushed Yield After Milling
« Reply #10 on: March 14, 2022, 10:44:09 AM »
I like the texture (or the absence of texture) better. I donít know that they taste much different one way or the other. As my pizzas have improved I am liking simple, smooth, uncooked sauces more - but not exclusively. I notice it more on thinner pizza crusts than heavier ones. Not a stupid question at all!


EDIT: after reading Jonís post Iíll add that it is the skins being gone that is the improvement. I havenít noticed many seeds before milling or in the residue left behind but I am not someone who minds seeds.

Hey, i also am a fan of sclafani crushed, but never tried milling them. have you noticed that having a thinner consistency in your sclafani tomatoes has improved your cheese melt? I have seen a lot of discussion about the necessity for thin sauces to help with the boiling of the sauce and cheese to create a nice cheese melt. What do you think on this issue seeing as how you and i use the same tomatoes and you are a fan of milling them?

Offline Santo

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Re: Sclafani Crushed Yield After Milling
« Reply #11 on: March 14, 2022, 10:46:18 AM »
I like the texture (or the absence of texture) better. I donít know that they taste much different one way or the other. As my pizzas have improved I am liking simple, smooth, uncooked sauces more - but not exclusively. I notice it more on thinner pizza crusts than heavier ones. Not a stupid question at all!


EDIT: after reading Jonís post Iíll add that it is the skins being gone that is the improvement. I havenít noticed many seeds before milling or in the residue left behind but I am not someone who minds seeds.

What is the difference in end result between using the immersion blender on the tomatoes vs milling them? And the end result on the pizza? Thanks.

Offline foreplease

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Re: Sclafani Crushed Yield After Milling
« Reply #12 on: March 14, 2022, 05:00:00 PM »
What is the difference in end result between using the immersion blender on the tomatoes vs milling them? And the end result on the pizza? Thanks.
I have not noticed any difference with my cheese melt. I guess I was happy before and am happy now. I bake until the cheese and other toppings look good to me. Possibly the bake time changed a little but I donít know.


I may have used an immersion blender somewhere along the way. The difference is that milling removes the parts I prefer not to have in my sauce rather than just makes the pieces smaller. I really like these tomatoes milled is the best I can tell you.
-Tony

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Sclafani Crushed Yield After Milling
« Reply #13 on: March 14, 2022, 05:31:02 PM »
Tony - in the original pics, it doesn't look like 1+2=full can. Am I wrong in think it should?
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Offline foreplease

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Re: Sclafani Crushed Yield After Millin
« Reply #14 on: March 14, 2022, 10:51:37 PM »
Tony - in the original pics, it doesn't look like 1+2=full can. Am I wrong in think it should?
Yes, I think I showed everything. It could be that I scraped material from the bottom of the screen and added it to the can (as it had already passed through the screen). In that sense, the first two photos may not show all there is. Hope this helps.
-Tony

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Offline RHawthorne

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If we're not questioning the reason for our existence, then what the hell are we doing here?!

Offline foreplease

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-Tony

Offline RHawthorne

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Re: Sclafani Crushed Yield After Milling
« Reply #17 on: March 15, 2022, 12:31:59 PM »
Youíll like that. Looks like an easy one to clean too.
I just hope it's well built. There are models on the market that cost way more than this one. I think my tomato sauce is probably about the only thing I'll use it for, so it's not like I'll be using to death.
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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Sclafani Crushed Yield After Milling
« Reply #18 on: March 15, 2022, 01:37:33 PM »
What is the difference in end result between using the immersion blender on the tomatoes vs milling them? And the end result on the pizza? Thanks.

Milling makes a pretty profound difference in crushed tomatoes as it removes the tiny bits of skin. It's a lot less noticeable on whole peeled as compared to stick blender. Really the difference is just the seeds and any harder stem pieces that may not get thoroughly blended. I always use the food mill on crushed and almost never on whole peeled.

The only time I use crushed is if I want a sweeter sauce. The tomatoes that go into crushed are generally the ones that are too ripe to peel.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, baker's yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

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