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Author Topic: Had this problem too many times now  (Read 707 times)

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Offline Anton1

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Re: Had this problem too many times now
« Reply #20 on: October 12, 2021, 06:31:11 PM »
Okay. Iím lost. And frustrated.
Latest this has been happening every time I make pizza.
This was never an issue before, and my kneading is typically done the same way as always.
Whether I do it by hand or use a kitchen aid mixer, I used to not have this problem before.
The yeast was not dead. (Active dry yeast)

You suggest I use cold water, but not if Iím using active dry yeast. (Thatís what I use as fresh yeast is just too hard for me to get consistently).

Are you stating that this issue only began after switching from fresh yeast to active dry yeast?

Anton1
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Offline Wario

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Re: Had this problem too many times now
« Reply #21 on: October 13, 2021, 03:22:32 PM »

Trigpizza,

I agree with Bill (Jersey Pie Boy) on the way that you used ice cold water with the ADY. Doing that most likely caused glutathione to be released from the ADY. The late Tom Lehmann discussed what happens in such as case, as well as the proper way to pre-hydrate ADY, in these posts:

Reply 11 at https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=39239.msg392751#msg392751

Reply 7 at https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=61055.msg610280;topicseen#msg610280

With respect to the salt, it need not be added toward the end of the mixing process. In Italy, that is sometimes done when the flour is initially a strong flour, and since salt will strengthen the dough during mixing and kneading, the Neapolitan pizza makers add the salt toward the end of the mixing and kneading steps. You indicated that you used the "dallaGiovanna pizzeria" flour. Is this the flour you used?:

https://www.youdreamitaly.com/en/Flour-FAR-Pizza-BLUE-Type-00-Kg-25-Molino-Dallagiovanna.xhtml?id=2114

Irrespective of the actual flour used, you can simply add the salt to the water and stir to dissolve. It can also be added to the flour.

I should also add that there is also no need to knead the dough to the point of passing the window pane test. Here is how Tom handled this matter:

Reply 4 at https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=61817.msg615652;topicseen#msg615652 

Reply 3 at https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=59277.msg594663#msg594663

I will leave to you to decide on what steps to take when you make your next batch of dough.

Peter
So if i understood correct, it is better to immediately make balls after kneading the dough?

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Had this problem too many times now
« Reply #22 on: October 13, 2021, 05:02:58 PM »
So if i understood correct, it is better to immediately make balls after kneading the dough?
Wario,

Not necessarily. One can go either way, and that applies to both professional and home settings.

Peter

Offline Wario

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Re: Had this problem too many times now
« Reply #23 on: October 14, 2021, 04:19:31 AM »
Wario,

Not necessarily. One can go either way, and that applies to both professional and home settings.

Peter
In that case - from a convenient perspective - i'd say making balls immediately after kneading is preferable since you don't have to handle the dough again after bulk rise.  ;D

Thanks!

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Had this problem too many times now
« Reply #24 on: October 14, 2021, 10:26:39 AM »
Wario,

I addressed this issue recently so if you would like to see greater detail, see the post at Reply 1 at:

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=69410.msg668823;topicseen#msg668823

To the above, I would add that pizza chains that use commissaries to make their doughs will go directly to dough balls, for the reason you mentioned. On the flip side, classic Neapolitan doughs are fermented in bulk and later formed into dough balls, both at ambient temperature.

Peter

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Offline scott r

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Re: Had this problem too many times now
« Reply #25 on: October 14, 2021, 10:55:02 AM »
Each method has a different end product.   You should try both and see which you prefer.

Offline Wario

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Re: Had this problem too many times now
« Reply #26 on: October 14, 2021, 12:11:02 PM »
Tried the direct into balls method and liked it. Indeed different but also good!

Offline Wario

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Re: Had this problem too many times now
« Reply #27 on: October 14, 2021, 12:23:21 PM »
Here's another go, it seems the dough is less puffy making it easier to make thin bottoms without uneven spots even without a rolling pin.

Yes, this pizza tasted really good!

Offline flilow06

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Re: Had this problem too many times now
« Reply #28 on: October 29, 2021, 10:46:45 AM »
I took photos of two scenarios from the illustrated troubleshooting guide in "The Neapolitan Pizza," depending on which you feel is more accurate:

1. Low volume of dough loaf
2. Collapsed dough loaf


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