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  • #1 by stevenfstein on 09 Jan 2018
  • Had a Kitchenaid machine for over 30 years (still works) and just got a new one with the updated dough hook. The owners manual states not to use anything greater than speed 2. Lots of the dough recipes I see and have tried start out at 2 but then move up to medium speed. Can I stay on speed 2 and get the results I need? This from the manual. "The PowerKnead™ Spiral Dough Hook efficiently kneads most yeast dough within 4 minutes."

    Best as always...  Steve
  • #2 by norcoscia on 09 Jan 2018
  • I go up to speed 3 sometimes if the dough starts to stick to the hook (that will fling it off so it starts to mix properly again) - but agree, the manual says no more that 2 - guess it also depends on the hydration and batch size to some extent....
  • #3 by enchant on 09 Jan 2018
  • I go up to speed 3 sometimes if the dough starts to stick to the hook (that will fling it off so it starts to mix properly again)

    That works???  I gotta try that.  I have a spatula and am constantly pulling it off as it's running.
  • #4 by The Dough Doctor on 09 Jan 2018
  • If you are constantly cutting the dough off of the agitator just go up to the next higher speed. Variations in dough absorption as well as dough size are what have the greatest influence on ability to mix at the higher speeds.
    Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor
  • #5 by the1mu on 10 Jan 2018
  • In addition to everything already said, the kind of KA also plays a role. Mine is a nicer one with metal gears and an automatic kill switch to protect the motor. Meaning, if/when it groans, I’m not worrying about damaging the internals. The cheaper models with gears that strip need to be treated differently.
  • #6 by QwertyJuan on 10 Jan 2018
  • In addition to everything already said, the kind of KA also plays a role. Mine is a nicer one with metal gears and an automatic kill switch to protect the motor. Meaning, if/when it groans, I’m not worrying about damaging the internals. The cheaper models with gears that strip need to be treated differently.

    Even the expensive ones can be broken way too easily in my opinion. I have a Commercial 8Qt and had the gear(gears??) break (or wear down??) on the drive motor that runs the front extensions for pasta. (we make a lot of pasta at my restaurant) and had to get a guy in to replace a couple gears and change the oil.
  • #7 by GoatGuy on 21 Jan 2018
  • True Story… about Kitchenaid Mixers

    My first KA was bought in 1989.  It was the 'locking base' type (5 qt);  made an endless amount of bread in it.   The users' manual had no warning about using only speeds up to 2.  But we also didn't push the thing.   After a decade, it started making "bad gear noises".  Being mechanically unafraid, I took it apart and found that the main plastic gear was wearing badly, and had lost little chunks.

    I called Kitchenaid, told them what I found, and asked if I could BUY another gear, preferably in metal!  Unlike so many stories I've read, they were nice, considerate and sold me a replacement gear for like $25 bucks or something.   Wasn't expensive, all in all.  After a harrowing replacement (wow, its way more complicated than I expected), got it back up and running.   Used white lithium grease as recommended, and that was that.   Still have that machine, and have thrown EVERYTHING at it.  Even mixed a small bâhtch of concrete once (I had too many beers).  Needed a new paddle after that.  The bowl didn't seem to care at all.

    One wife later, I have a new machine.  Again "screw-base" type, 5 quart.  Been making doughs for some time.  Preëmptively, since I know the model's issues, I called customer support and tried to buy a replacement gear.  The service was terrible; they wanted to debate with me why I was fixing something that hadn't yet broke.  I told them: because its important that it NOT break when I need it.  After pulling my hair out, I finally got the name of a person to whom I should write a letter.   I forwent most of the misery, and just asked what part number the metal replacement gear is, and could I buy one.  I got a reply some 5 weeks later, a form letter.   Telling me it was policy not to sell parts to the public, but only authorized KA repair depots.  So… I remain on the original gearing.

    NOTE it has had a lot of dough-time.  It isn't making bad noises.  And it is admittedly 20+ years newer than my original, so maybe the gear formulation is better.  Not perfect, not bomb-proof, but better.  I hope so.

    My personal experience,
    GoatGuy
  • #8 by The Dough Doctor on 22 Jan 2018
  • A great 5-quart capacity dough mixer is the Hobart N-50 mixer. It has 3-speeds, all metal gears and it is considered to be the Clydesdale of all the small Hobart mixers. We used them for many, many years at AIB and never once did they ever require any servicing.
    Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor
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