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Author Topic: List of doctored olive oils and list of pure olive oil  (Read 806 times)

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Online nick57

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List of doctored olive oils and list of pure olive oil
« on: June 26, 2017, 05:22:18 PM »
  Doctored olive oil has been in the news as of late. 60 Minutes did a story about quite a bit of olive oil from Italy that has been doctored with other oils to increase profits. American olive oil has a better track record. Though seven American producers have been caught adulterating their products.

Here are the ones that failed:

Bertolli
Felippo Berio
Mazola
Pompeian
Primadonna
Carapelli
Coricelli
Mezzetta
Star
Sasso
Colavita
Whole Foods
Antica Badia
Safeway

Here are the ones that passed.

Ottavio
Kirkland Organic
Corto Olive
Lucero
California Olive Ranch
Bariani Olive Oil
Cobram Estate
Lucini
McEvoy Ranch Organic
Omaggio
Olea Estates

I have been using California Olive Ranch. I really like it. If you want to see if you have the real deal...

  Start by placing the suspected bottle of olive oil in the fridge for about half an hour If the oil starts to freeze or solidify by then, it means that the oil is pure. This is because any oil with a high amount of monosaturated fat would freeze over easily. On the flipside, if the oil does NOT become solid, then it is fake. If you’re looking to buy olive oil in the supermarket but are unsure, try looking for any official governmental seals of approval on the labels of the bottle, such as, “Australian Extra Virgin Certified” or “California Olive Oil Council Certified Extra Virgin” and so on.


Offline bregent

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Re: List of doctored olive oils and list of pure olive oil
« Reply #1 on: June 26, 2017, 06:07:46 PM »
I highly recommend the book "Extra Virginity" by Tom Mueller. Lots of fascinating info and details of how adulterated oil can fool expert tasting panels.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/0393343618/?tag=pmak-20
Bob

Offline apizza

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Re: List of doctored olive oils and list of pure olive oil
« Reply #2 on: June 26, 2017, 07:47:46 PM »
There is stuff all over the web that the fridge test is  a myth. I'm at the I don't care point and buy what I like. Just don't know who to believe at this point. I think there are many threads about olive oil quality and it just keeps coming up. A little frustrating.




Marty

Offline IndyRob

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Re: List of doctored olive oils and list of pure olive oil
« Reply #3 on: July 04, 2017, 07:22:55 PM »
I discovered California Olive Ranch by the luck of the draw.  When I opened the first bottle I poured a little on my finger to taste.  A loyal customer was born right there.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: List of doctored olive oils and list of pure olive oil
« Reply #4 on: July 04, 2017, 07:56:54 PM »
I discovered California Olive Ranch about five years ago and after sampling their olive oils I stopped buying any other brand. One of their best olive oils in my opinion is the Limited Reserve EVOO that is offered toward the end of the year, although they sometimes make it into the early part of the next year. I usually wait for their specials (discounts on the oil or shipping discounts).

For diversity, I also like their Gold Medal Oils such as shown at http://shop.californiaoliveranch.com/Reserve-Collection-3Bottle-Gift-Box/p/COR-GIFTKE3&[email protected]. Again, I usually wait for specials. I registered at the COR website, so they send me emails when they have specials.

All of the oils go great with bread, they are quite addictive when eaten that way.

Buying domestic from quality producers avoids a lot of the problems or perceived problems with imported oils. It is a shame since I am sure that there are a lot of quality olive oils from abroad.

Peter

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Offline parallei

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Re: List of doctored olive oils and list of pure olive oil
« Reply #5 on: July 04, 2017, 08:27:31 PM »
Limited Reserve EVOO that is offered toward the end of the year, although they sometimes make it into the early part of the next year. I usually wait for their specials
Peter

The only OO I've used for years is their everyday extra virgin.  On your recommendation, last year I bought a couple of bottles of their Limited Reserve.  Good stuff.

Offline Jackitup

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Re: List of doctored olive oils and list of pure olive oil
« Reply #6 on: July 05, 2017, 01:44:09 AM »
Copied from Consumer Reports,

How to Find the Best Extra-Virgin Olive Oil
Our taste tests show that some oils don’t make the grade
Consumer Reports magazine: September 2012

To gauge color differences, our experts looked at oils poured into white porcelain spoons.
Many “extra virgin” olive oils—including big names such as Bertolli, Crisco, Filippo Berio, and Mazola—don’t taste good enough to merit that description. By definition, extra-virgin olive oil is supposed to be flawless, but only the top nine of the 23 products our experts tried were free of flaws. More than half tasted fermented or stale. Two even tasted a bit like . . . let’s just say a barnyard. That problem can occur if oil is stored in vats containing sediment that has begun to ferment. The good news is that two products were excellent; one of those is a CR Best Buy.

You may not be able to easily spot a dud. Most people don’t sip olive oil straight from a glass, as our experts did, and foods can mask imperfections. In addition, many consumers assume that olive oil should be a liquid version of the fruit they put in a salad or martini. Wrong. Superior oils are fresh and fragrant, with complex flavors of ripe and unripe fruit, grass, herbs, nuts, or butter, for starters. If you’re used to a particular product, you might not realize what you’re missing until you do your own side-by-side comparison. It’s like learning to appreciate and enjoy fine wine.

Look to the West

Our Ratings show that you don’t need to buy oil with an Italian heritage to experience the best. California, which produces about 3 percent of the olive oil consumed in the U.S., is the source of the only two products judged Excellent: McEvoy Ranch (grown on a 550-acre property in Petaluma) and Trader Joe’s California Estate oil (“crafted to our specifications from the first press of Arbequina olives grown on estate ranches in the Sierra foothills”), which costs far less than McEvoy: 35 cents per ounce compared with $1.73.

Three of the six Very Good oils also have a California pedigree: B.R. Cohn, 365 Everyday Value (Whole Foods), and California Olive Ranch. O-Live & Co. is pressed from Chilean olives. Only Lucini Premium Select and Kirkland Signature (Costco) Select Toscano are from olives grown in Italy. The other rated products contain olives from a mix of nations, such as Argentina, Greece, Italy, Morocco, Spain, Tunisia, and Turkey. Goya, a winner in our tests years ago, scored only a Fair this time around.

See the Ratings charts as they originally appeared in the September 2012 issue of Consumer Reports Magazine.
Extra-virgin olive oils  |
What is extra virgin, anyway?

Trader Joe’s California Estate oil
Trader Joe’s California Estate oil
In Europe, the International Olive Council, chartered by the United Nations, establishes standards and works to ensure that products labeled extra virgin, the highest grade of oil, live up to their billing; the countries do the policing. According to the IOC, extra-virgin olive oil must meet strict chemical and organoleptic (taste and smell) standards, including low levels of acidity and ultraviolet-light absorption. (High levels suggest poor processing or deterioration.) It has been extracted from mashed fruit by mechanical means, not through the use of heat or chemicals, which can reduce flavor. It should have at least some fruitiness and be free of defects in flavor and aroma.

Lower grades include virgin, which is allowed some sensory flaws and higher acidity; pure or plain, a blend of virgin and refined olive oils (refined has been treated with heat or chemicals); and pomace olive oil, obtained by treating ground pits and leftover flesh with solvents, and generally used in soap-making, frying, and industry. Another variety, “light,” refers to color, not calories or fat. It’s essentially flavorless.

European companies that sell products in the U.S. aren’t bound by IOC rules, and the organization doesn’t inspect those imports. Oils made in America and imports can simply call themselves extra virgin. The Food and Drug Administration usually steps in only when olive-oil mislabeling involves adulteration. (Some sellers have been known to spike extra-virgin oil with cheaper oils and palm them off on wholesalers.)

In 2010 the Department of Agriculture adopted standards similar to the IOC’s, but they’re voluntary. Producers, distributors, and importers can choose to participate in the agency’s Quality Monitoring Program to verify the flavor, aroma, and purity of their oils. Products that pass muster receive a seal that can be displayed on packaging. To ensure that quality is maintained, the USDA says it will make surprise visits to plants to gather samples for ongoing testing.

The two Pompeian oils were the first to be certified. In our tests, conducted before certification, they were Fair at best. Nonorganic Pompeian was fusty (with a fermented-fruit character) and slightly stale; the organic version was rancid.

The North American Olive Oil Association, a trade group, has a testing and certification program of its own, based on the IOC’s criteria. Approved products can display a “certified quality” seal, but the four tested oils with that seal—Bertolli, Crisco, and both Pompeians—didn’t taste extra virgin in our experts’ opinion.

A healthy fat

More than half of U.S. households keep olive oil on hand, up from 30 percent just five years ago, according to the North American Olive Oil Association, an industry group. (Americans still consume far less than people of other nations: about 1 liter per person each year, compared with 13 liters for Italians and 24 for Greeks.)

Health is a main reason for its popularity. Olive oil consists mostly of monounsaturated fatty acids. A diet that emphasizes monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats (in low-mercury fish such as salmon, pollock, and tilapia; some plants; and nut oils) rather than saturated fats and trans fats (think butter and stick margarine) may lower the risk of heart disease. For instance, monounsaturated fats may reduce total cholesterol and LDL (bad) cholesterol levels and normalize blood clotting, according to the Mayo Clinic. Some research shows that those fats may improve insulin levels and help control blood sugar, a goal for people with type 2 diabetes. Olive oil also contains antioxidants, thought to protect the body from certain diseases. But consume it in moderation. Olive oil has 120 calories and 14 grams of fat per tablespoon, the same as in other oils.

How to choose, how to use

You can deep-fry or stir-fry in olive oil, use it in sauces, dip bread in it, or mix it into salads, entrées—even ice cream. (California Olive Ranch suggests a scoop of vanilla topped off with olive oil and a few grains of sea salt.) Consider buying two olive oils: one for cooking and the other for drizzling.

Cook in it. It’s a waste to fry with an expensive olive oil. High heat can destroy subtle flavors. Any inexpensive oil rated Very Good or even Good should be fine. You could even consider a nonvirgin olive oil, though we found minimal price differences between that and extra-virgin.

Drizzle it. Unlike neutral vegetable oils, olive oil imparts its own character to a dish, so think of it as a seasoning. Extra-virgin oils have nuances you won’t find elsewhere. Some people may be startled by a sharp, peppery bite from a robust oil such as McEvoy Ranch, which stands up to red meat, salad, and cheese. The mellower Lucini, with a citrus note, might pair better with delicate fish. But there are no rules. Try a few olive oils to find what you like.

Keep it fresh. An unopened container of a high-quality olive oil may stay fresh for up to two years after it’s packed, though there will be a gradual falloff in flavor even if the bottle remains sealed. Once it’s opened, you can store olive oil, tightly capped, for months in any cool, dark place. (Heat, light, and air can degrade the taste of olive oil and possibly its nutrients.) Oil can be refrigerated if you don’t use it often. It will liquefy quickly at room temperature. Oil will keep better in glass than in plastic, and the darker the bottle, the better. If you transfer oil from its container into a smaller bottle or dish for serving, don’t pour fresh oil on top of old, which increases the risk of rancidity.

Bottom line. Don’t believe every extra-virgin claim. The Ratings point to Excellent and Very Good choices but also to a minefield of lower-quality products. Use McEvoy Ranch and Trader Joe’s in ways that show off their strong, complex, fresh taste—drizzled over bread, for example. Other Very Good choices include Kirkland Signature and 365 Everyday Value, both CR Best Buys. (The Kirkland product is generally available only from late December through September.) It’s fine to use some of the lower-rated products in cooking.

Decoding labels


Every label tells a story, but that story can be a mystery. Here’s how to interpret what’s on the bottle.

Country of origin. Italian-sounding brands dominate store shelves, and many people assume that the best oils come from Italy. Companies play off that assumption, so read labels carefully. Bertolli’s main label, for example, says “Imported from Italy”; the back, in minuscule type, reveals that the product may contain olives from eight countries, including Italy. If heritage matters to you—and our tests show that it shouldn’t—look for clear statements such as those used by Colavita: “Obtained exclusively from olives harvested and pressed in Italy.”

Acidity. You may see an acidity number on the label; the lower the number, the better the flavor. To be called extra-virgin, the Department of Agriculture says, oil must have a free-fatty-acid content, expressed as oleic acid, of no more than 0.8 percent per 100 grams. Many factors affect acidity levels, including the maturity of the fruit, harvesting and pressing practices, cleanliness of the presses, and whether the olives were picked off the ground or from the tree.

First cold press. The term harks back to a time when olives were crushed under huge stone wheels, the paste was then spread across mats, and mechanical pressure was applied to squeeze out the oil. That procedure has been replaced by more high-tech and hygienic techniques, though some producers still incorporate stones in sophisticated machinery. As for “cold,” all extra-virgin olive oil comes from the first pressing of the olive paste produced through “cold” or mechanical means, without the use of heat or chemicals. The claim is meaningless.

Color. Among olive oil’s many hues: pale yellow, almost honey gold, deep yellow-green, and bright green. Color isn’t linked to quality, but it can hint at an oil’s general character. A golden hue suggests the use of ripe olives, which tends to result in nutty, buttery, or fresh, flowery notes. Green signals fruit that’s not fully mature, which may convey a sharp, bitter (in a good way) taste reminiscent of fresh-cut grass, unripe banana, tart apple, or other herbs and vegetables. To eliminate potential color bias, we had our experts sip oils from cobalt-blue glasses.


Our taste tests
Ratings are based on blind taste tests by two experts, who evaluated three samples of each oil. For most brands, they evaluated three separate lots (date codes), but due to availability they could taste only one lot of Pompeian Organic, 365 Everyday Value, and Kirkland Signature, and two of Trader Joe’s. Cost per ounce is approximate retail, usually based on a half-lier container (about 17 ounces). B.R. Cohn came in the smallest bottle, 6.7 ounces; Kirkland Signature, Capatriti, and 365 Everyday Value, the largest, around 34 ounces. Most oils are widely available, but McEvoy Ranch (shown, mcevoyranch.com) and B.R. Cohn (brcohn.com) are sold at specialty stores and online
Jon

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Offline TXCraig1

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Re: List of doctored olive oils and list of pure olive oil
« Reply #7 on: July 05, 2017, 09:21:08 AM »
I wouldn't believe much of anything written about olive oil without doing some research. I'm pretty sure the 60 Minutes piece was based on a 2011 report from UC Davis1  that was funded by California oil interests and appears to have been debunked as using highly questionable methodologies in a thinly veiled attempt to promote California olive oil and discredit imports2.

I had one olive oil on the list of products that failed - Pompeian. I looked and noted that it carried logos for both the USDA and North American Olive Oil Association certification programs. While the NAOOA is a trade group, it's certification criteria appears to be legitimate3. It's interesting that NAOOA's list of certified olive oils reads like a who's who of the UC Davis/60 minute list of fakes.

1 http://olivecenter.ucdavis.edu/research/files/report041211finalreduced.pdf
2 http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20110414006251/en/UC-Davis-Study-Imported-Olive-Oils-Flawed
3 https://www.oliveoiltimes.com/olive-oil-basics/olive-oil-quality-seals/34742
4 http://blog.aboutoliveoil.org/21-olive-oil-brands-certified-for-authenticity
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Offline bregent

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Re: List of doctored olive oils and list of pure olive oil
« Reply #8 on: July 05, 2017, 12:56:37 PM »
I get all of my oil from Amphora Nueva, which is owned and run by Mike Bradley and family. They have several stores in the SF Bay Area. Mike is an importer and producer and is very well regarded in the industry and they import oils from all around the world. Their oils all list the harvest date and crucial chemical metrics. And prices are good, around $20/750ml. If you're ever in the Bay Area stop by one of their locations and you can sample all varieties they have available.
Bob

Offline norma427

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Re: List of doctored olive oils and list of pure olive oil
« Reply #9 on: September 20, 2017, 07:57:36 AM »

Key differences in Corto's vineyard-style methods and Mediterranean-style method of producing olive oil.



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Online nick57

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Re: List of doctored olive oils and list of pure olive oil
« Reply #10 on: September 25, 2017, 02:09:33 PM »
Norma, that was interesting. As of late I only buy olive oil from California. Thanks for sharing.

Offline Fiorot

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Re: List of doctored olive oils and list of pure olive oil
« Reply #11 on: September 25, 2017, 05:57:41 PM »
Sorry but the Nephew's company holds the advertising account for Pompeian.   He has visited the bottling plant.  Pompeian does not blend or bottle of shore.  All oils are blended in the USA.  And every bottle has the country of origin on the label.   The Kirkland products come down the same bottling line as the Pompeian Label.   Let's face it. This is not the first time Cucumber Reports miss the mark.

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