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Author Topic: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!  (Read 905730 times)

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Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #2980 on: March 30, 2016, 07:28:13 PM »
So, a local mason, who is a pizza aficionado, will come to my house tomorrow to cut the biscotto tiles for a nominal fee, $50 dollars plus homemade pizzas. :D Today, I made a template (see the pictures attached below) to guide me in marking the tiles. Good day!
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #2981 on: March 31, 2016, 01:22:17 AM »
Very good!  ;D
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, baker's yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
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Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #2982 on: April 02, 2016, 06:37:32 AM »
Very good!  ;D

Thank you! My little oven has a new and improved transmission now. See the pictures attached hereunder. A couple of days ago, the mason cut the biscotto tiles with only an angle grinder equipped with a diamond blade. It took him no more than 20 minutes to complete the task. The template proved to be quite instrumental. It was so easy for him to cut the tiles, like cutting paper with scissors. Afterwards, I did some sanding on the sides and edges of the tiles to make them smooth. 

One of the tiles (the right one all the way in the back of the oven) has less depth, by about 3-4 millimeters, than the adjacent tiles. So, I deposited some sea salt under the tile (see the last picture) in order to level it with the adjacent tiles. I would have used sand, instead of salt, if I had any at home. I hope the salt under the tile does not significantly impact the thermal performance of it in comparison to the adjoining tiles. It is probably negligible. Good day!

Omid
« Last Edit: April 04, 2016, 02:31:20 AM by Pizza Napoletana »
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

Offline Matthew

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #2983 on: April 02, 2016, 06:40:29 AM »
Looks great Omid!


Matthew

Offline bradtri

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #2984 on: April 02, 2016, 09:51:51 AM »
Very nice ... I hope you have pizzas planned for today so that you can show us the results!!

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Offline parallei

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #2985 on: April 02, 2016, 11:51:18 AM »
That worked out well, Omid.  Have fun!

Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #2986 on: April 02, 2016, 05:40:34 PM »
Dear friends, thank you. I am not sure when I will be able to test the oven. I have to wait until I have some off days from work.

I have been thinking about replacing the salt under the tile with sand which, as far as I know, is chemically less inert than salt at the Neapolitan temperatures. I understand that salt melts at about 1,474F (801C), which is much hotter than the temperatures the tile will reach. Then, I viewed this video on Youtube:



Since I want my oven's original floor left intact, it seems that sand might be a better choice than salt. The melting point of sand is approximately 3,000F (1650C). Any opinions?

Regards,
Omid
« Last Edit: April 04, 2016, 02:37:22 AM by Pizza Napoletana »
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

Offline schold

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #2987 on: April 03, 2016, 10:58:30 AM »
You'll be fine with salt. By the way, inert means "not chemically reactive".
Cooking is not a recipe, it's a philosophy - unless it's pastry, then it's chemistry.

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Offline Ogwoodfire

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #2988 on: April 03, 2016, 03:27:53 PM »
Looks great! I think you will enjoy it.

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #2989 on: April 03, 2016, 06:14:30 PM »
Salt is on the order of 10x more conductive than sand, and sand is almost certainly well below that of the saputo tiles. There may be a performance benefit to salt particularly with multiple bakes in rapid succession. I don't have a sense if the difference would be significant.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, baker's yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
Craig's Neapolitan Garage

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Offline parallei

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #2990 on: April 03, 2016, 06:57:05 PM »

Since I want my oven's original floor left intact, it seems that sand might be a better choice than salt. Any opinions?

Regards,
Omid

Well, I guess I'd vote for the sand.  Maybe only because I remember the old line from my student days that said : "Remember, the road to hell is paved with silicon dioxide".


Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #2991 on: April 04, 2016, 04:38:55 AM »
I thank you all for your comments. I took the "road to hell". In fact, based on a competent advice, I covered the entire oven floor with a thin layer of sand and positioned the biscotto tiles on top. When I find some time, I will initiate the curing of the tiles. Again, I appreciate all your help. Good day!

Omid
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

Offline fagilia

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #2992 on: April 05, 2016, 05:41:58 AM »
My biscotti floor is only 1,5cm thick and sand under and the firebricks. The floor has never gotten to cold for baking pizza. Quite the opposite actually
I need to make pizzas continuely to not get floor to hot.

Offline stonecutter

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #2993 on: April 07, 2016, 05:26:44 PM »
I doubt there would be any discernment of the different conductivity qualities between salt and sand with a layer that thin anyway.
When we build, let us think that we build forever.
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Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #2994 on: April 08, 2016, 05:56:46 PM »
Here is an ancient rule that I find inspiring in preparing Neapolitan pizza dough. According to Vincenzo Errico of Pizzeria Brandi:

"We follow a rule that, no matter if it's humid or hot or cold, we have to adapt the pizza dough to the temperature and the weather."



Just a detail, but what is the purpose of the seemingly deliberate basil leaf tucked underneath the dough at just after 1:35?

It happens fast...but I think he was repairing a hole/tear. Good day!  ;D

I had seen this trick performed before in another video. The only thing I can think of is that the basil leaf is supposed to strengthen and patch the hole on the bottom surface of the dough disc, so that the melted cheese would not ooze from the hole onto the oven floor. I do not know how practical this solution might be. Good day!



« Last Edit: April 08, 2016, 06:01:04 PM by Pizza Napoletana »
Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

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Offline dylandylan

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #2995 on: April 09, 2016, 05:04:15 AM »
Nice, I've resorted to this trick a few times since you first mentioned it.  I tend to stretch a bit too thin sometimes so knowing how to repair a hole comes in handy.

Offline parallei

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #2996 on: April 09, 2016, 07:18:14 PM »
I took the "road to hell"...........Omid

Great!  I'll meet you there, along with the rest of the interesting people......... >:D

Looking forward to seeing the pies out of your modified oven.


Offline Pizza Napoletana

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #2997 on: April 26, 2016, 10:08:16 PM »
Dear friends, I finally got to test my new biscotto oven floor last night. Below is a video and pictures showing my very first bake on the new oven floor. Before launching the pizza, the temperature of the oven floor registered at 940F (504C). (At this temperature, my original oven floor would have completely burned the bottom of my pizzas within seconds.)

My oven was preheated by a propane torch for 2 hours (in order to avoid fumes) and then by wood fire for 1 hour. I used a 16-hour Caputo pizzeria dough, which had a hydration of about 68 percent. About an hour after this bake, the bottom of my pizzas baked much, much better than what is shown in the last picture, below. I conclude that, the Saputo biscotto tiles have been the best thing ever happened to my oven. Good day!

Omid

Recipes make pizzas no more than sermons make saints!

http://pizzanapoletanismo.com/2011/09/27/a-philosophy-of-pizza-napoletanismo/

Offline thezaman

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #2998 on: April 26, 2016, 10:23:37 PM »
 unbelievable, that at that temperature you are getting such a nice underside.!!!!

Offline Matthew

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Re: A PHILOSOPHY OF PIZZA NAPOLETANISMO!
« Reply #2999 on: April 27, 2016, 05:23:35 AM »
Dear friends, I finally got to test my new biscotto oven floor last night. Below is a video and pictures showing my very first bake on the new oven floor. Before launching the pizza, the temperature of the oven floor registered at 940F (504C). (At this temperature, my original oven floor would have completely burned the bottom of my pizzas within seconds.)

My oven was preheated by a propane torch for 2 hours (in order to avoid fumes) and then by wood fire for 1 hour. I used a 16-hour Caputo pizzeria dough, which had a hydration of about 68 percent. About an hour after this bake, the bottom of my pizzas baked much, much better than what is shown in the last picture, below. I conclude that, the Saputo biscotto tiles have been the best thing ever happened to my oven. Good day!

Omid




Great job Omid,
I am happy to hear that it worked out for you.


Matthew

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