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Author Topic: Dough tears when balling? Can you over ball?  (Read 928 times)

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Offline CupnCharRoni

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Dough tears when balling? Can you over ball?
« on: April 16, 2020, 09:34:28 AM »
I've been really struggling with ny style dough. Stretching has not been going well at all. I use a bosch compact mixer and I'm starting to wonder if the mixing capacity is becoming the issue.

The dough never really seems smooth. I made glutenboy's recipie yesterday, bulk fermented and then divided. Mixed to the times in the post. Maybe 6-8 min of total time. I used all trumps flour.


When I went to ball it after a few good turns of it looking good the top of the dough stated to look a little rough as it was tearing. I did some googling and it said under developed gluten. So I did 5 min of hand kneading, 15 min rest, 2-3 min of kneading and another 10 min rest to get some gluten built up. But the same tearing is happening before I feel like the dough really gets balled well. Am I over balling the dough? After 1-2 turns of balling the top does looks somewhat smooth but there just isn't the tension in the dough i'd expect. It's nothing like the smooth texture I see in youtube videos.

The dough does pass the window pane test. So i can't tell if i'm over or under working the dough. Should I stop balling sooner? Give it more time in the mixer or by hand?
« Last Edit: April 16, 2020, 09:46:49 AM by CupnCharRoni »

Offline amolapizza

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Re: Dough tears when balling? Can you over ball?
« Reply #1 on: April 16, 2020, 09:46:49 AM »
I don't know the answer to your question, but my gut feeling says to stop immediately if you see tearing on the surface!  That goes for balling, but also for hand or machine mixing, shaping, etc.
Jack

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Offline CupnCharRoni

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Re: Dough tears when balling? Can you over ball?
« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2020, 09:47:59 AM »
I don't know the answer to your question, but my gut feeling says to stop immediately if you see tearing on the surface!  That goes for balling, but also for hand or machine mixing, shaping, etc.

How do you progress past that once your notice it happening? Rest the dough and try to ball again?

Offline amolapizza

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Re: Dough tears when balling? Can you over ball?
« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2020, 09:54:54 AM »
I think the only thing you could do is to let the dough rest and/or possibly try to make the balls less tight.

When you see the skin tearing it means that the gluten is tearing and I'd never want to see that with my own dough be that for bread or for pizza.
Jack

Effeuno P134H (500C), Biscotto Fornace Saputo, Sunmix Sun6, Caputo Pizzeria, Caputo Saccorosso, Mutti Pelati.

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Dough tears when balling? Can you over ball?
« Reply #4 on: April 16, 2020, 11:58:28 AM »
First off, the "window pane" test for gluten development is used for determining the proper mix for a bread dough not a pizza dough. Pizza doughs are correctly mixed when the dough JUST takes on a smooth appearance. You do not want to mix the dough more than this. Allowing the dough to ferment for an hour before balling is just asking for the dough to tear during balling, especially with a strong flour like All Trumps. My suggestion would be to just scale and ball immediately after mixing, and then manage the dough as you wish from there.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

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Offline CupnCharRoni

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Re: Dough tears when balling? Can you over ball?
« Reply #5 on: April 16, 2020, 12:11:44 PM »
First off, the "window pane" test for gluten development is used for determining the proper mix for a bread dough not a pizza dough. Pizza doughs are correctly mixed when the dough JUST takes on a smooth appearance. You do not want to mix the dough more than this. Allowing the dough to ferment for an hour before balling is just asking for the dough to tear during balling, especially with a strong flour like All Trumps. My suggestion would be to just scale and ball immediately after mixing, and then manage the dough as you wish from there.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Well I guess I found the issue with the process. I will try mixing less next time too. You mean "just smooth" as in while it's still in the mixer right? Not when balling.

Is there anyway to recover from this though? I'm not expecting the dough to stretch well at all, and I have 5 portions already made :). I can make something like pan pies too I guess.

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Dough tears when balling? Can you over ball?
« Reply #6 on: April 16, 2020, 12:23:33 PM »
Your best bet will be to allow the dough balls to rest, undisturbed at room temperature until they have softened sufficiently to be opened into skins without tearing. If you want to make pan pizzas using the dough just grease a dark colored, deep-dish pan with Crisco (Butter Flavored Crisco is my favorite), but margarine or lard works well too. Flatten the dough ball into a puck shape and place into the pan, drape with a piece of plastic and allow to rest for 30-minutes, then using your hands, press and stretch the dough to fit the pan, don't worry if it fights you or pulls back, just cover it back up and allow to ferment for another 30 to 45-minutes, finish shaping the dough to the pan, it should stay put this time. Cover the panned dough with the plastic again and allow to final proof for 30-minutes, you're then ready to dress and bake.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

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