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Offline charlo489

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biscotto question
« on: June 22, 2021, 07:14:45 PM »
So what's the deal wiht those biscotto stones ? I have a koda 16 and only bake at high temperature for 90 seconds, would I gain something with those biscotto stones ?

Offline billg

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Re: biscotto question
« Reply #1 on: June 22, 2021, 09:04:12 PM »
So what's the deal wiht those biscotto stones ? I have a koda 16 and only bake at high temperature for 90 seconds, would I gain something with those biscotto stones ?

If Neapolitan pizza is your desired pie then the Saputo will definitely help.  If New York style is your thing then it won't be worth switching.  There is a considerable difference in Conductivity between the two stones especially at deck temps above 750f!

Offline charlo489

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Re: biscotto question
« Reply #2 on: June 22, 2021, 10:25:18 PM »
well with the stock stone, it can sometimes burn the bottom but it is uncommon....what are the benefits of the biscotto ? Less burning and more browning ?

Offline Gene in Acadiana

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Re: biscotto question
« Reply #3 on: June 23, 2021, 04:29:33 AM »
So what's the deal wiht those biscotto stones ? I have a koda 16 and only bake at high temperature for 90 seconds, would I gain something with those biscotto stones ?

Biscotto/Saputo stones radiate less heat under very high temperatures than standard pizza stones. 90 seconds is a little long for a Neapolitan so your koda 16 might not be hitting really high Neapolitan temperatures so it's not burning underneath. If you're happy with your results than there's no reason to switch but if you wanted to try to get a 60 second or less bake at a higher temperature, the regular stone you're using might start charring the bottom unlike Saputo.

Lately I've been preferring a slightly longer bake at a lower temperature (around 750-800 F) to get a slightly crispier and less soft crust than a traditional Neapolitan. I have Saputo stones in my oven and they never burn the bottom, even if I go over 900 F. 

Offline Heikjo

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Re: biscotto question
« Reply #4 on: June 23, 2021, 05:47:21 AM »
I agree with Gene. If you bake at full heat today and get it done in 90 seconds without the bottom charring, I don't know if a biscotto will help. If the top heat can't bake it faster than the stone, switching to a stone that bake slower won't make the result better.

I use an electric oven, so I don't know if my experience is directly transferrable to gas, but I do know that the point of the biscotto in my oven is to have a stone with more mass that can deliver heat to the bottom at a slower pace, but also with enough retained heat to do so in 60 seconds.
Heine
Oven: Effeuno P134H

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Offline charlo489

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Re: biscotto question
« Reply #5 on: June 23, 2021, 07:48:01 AM »
ah I see...well I let my koda preheat for 30-40 minutes and launch my pizzas when the center of the stone gets to 750-780F, it rarely goes over 800F unless I put on my homemade door. So napoliteans oven floor temperatures are hotter than 800F then ?
« Last Edit: June 23, 2021, 07:50:42 AM by charlo489 »

Offline Gene in Acadiana

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Re: biscotto question
« Reply #6 on: June 23, 2021, 05:35:40 PM »
ah I see...well I let my koda preheat for 30-40 minutes and launch my pizzas when the center of the stone gets to 750-780F, it rarely goes over 800F unless I put on my homemade door. So napoliteans oven floor temperatures are hotter than 800F then ?

Yes. When I was doing 60 sec bakes (or slightly less) for a more traditional Neapolitan, the floor temps were usually between 850 and 900 F.

Heikjo raised a good point. If you were to switch to Saputo stones and continued baking using the same temps, your bottom crust will be slightly under-cooked compared to the top at the 90 second mark.

Offline Heikjo

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Re: biscotto question
« Reply #7 on: June 24, 2021, 05:54:07 AM »
ah I see...well I let my koda preheat for 30-40 minutes and launch my pizzas when the center of the stone gets to 750-780F, it rarely goes over 800F unless I put on my homemade door. So napoliteans oven floor temperatures are hotter than 800F then ?
The absolute value of the floor temp isn't as important since it will depend on what kind of oven you got. A thin floor without any heat from below may need a higher temperature since it has less mass to store heat and deliver during those 40-90 seconds. A floor with more mass or with heating from below may need a lower temperature since it would burn the bottom if it was too high.

There are a myriad of ovens out there, gas, electric and wood fired. To make a great NP pizza you need a balance between top heat and bottom heat, and how you achieve that will change from oven to oven. You have a Koda 16 so I would recommend looking at tips directly from other Koda 16 users, or at least gas burned ovens. The floor temperature of a big WFO or electric oven won't help you much in your oven. Some bake in 40 seconds, some in 90.

If an oven can only provide a floor temperature to bake 90 second pies, you don't want the top to deliver heat that can finish it in 60 seconds and vice versa. Your dough will also make a difference on bake times, so even if you compare 1:1 with another Koda 16 user, your mileage may wary. Experimentation and testing is needed.
Heine
Oven: Effeuno P134H

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