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Author Topic: Al Taglio dough fermentation  (Read 215 times)

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Offline PizzaF1

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Al Taglio dough fermentation
« on: October 05, 2021, 08:43:26 AM »
Hi,
I was wondering, when making high hydration al taglio dough and fermenting for 72/96 hours as dough balls should i re ball the dough each day or just leave it as is until baking day?

Thanks for the help 👍

Offline amolapizza

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Re: Al Taglio dough fermentation
« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2021, 09:25:26 AM »
I've never done such long fermentation.  What I've learnt in Italy is 80% hydration with a stronger flour, 48 hours fridge fermentation, then remove from fridge and fold and finally form the ball and leave at room temp for 4 hours, before stretching and baking.
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Offline PizzaF1

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Re: Al Taglio dough fermentation
« Reply #2 on: October 05, 2021, 10:04:34 AM »
I thought about it but i think that when using a small amount of yeast for long fermentation it will take time for the dough to rise again if the temprature is not high.  I will give it a try. Thank you!

Offline drainaps

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Re: Al Taglio dough fermentation
« Reply #3 on: October 05, 2021, 10:05:41 AM »
You might want to fold the dough once depending on hydration, so that your dough gets some more structure before balling, but it all depends on your flour, hydration , % yeast AND most importantly mixing technique.

If you go the autolysis way, you might want to just do 2-3 stretch and folds to build gluten , instead of building gluten in your mixer, then portion, rest, ball and store.

If you build your gluten mechanically in the mixer, and it’s high hydration, you might still want to keep your dough around for one stretch and fold before portioning and balling, to get a better-structured gluten. But you have to be careful that your dough leaves the mixer at a temperature that allows you to keep it around for an additional 30-45 minutes, and your yeast % is low enough.

In the end it all depends on temperatures,%  yeast, hydration and how you mix. It’s all connected so it’s  difficult to give you an answer with so many unknowns.

In any case I don’t think it’s  good for your gluten structure to mess with things by balling again during proofing.
« Last Edit: October 05, 2021, 10:29:26 AM by drainaps »

Offline killerasp

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Re: Al Taglio dough fermentation
« Reply #4 on: October 10, 2021, 09:35:32 PM »
Hi,
I was wondering, when making high hydration al taglio dough and fermenting for 72/96 hours as dough balls should i re ball the dough each day or just leave it as is until baking day?

Thanks for the help 👍

just ball them up after you bulk ferment and put them into separate containers so they don't all stick to each other. it will be super hard to take them apart.

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Offline Yael

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Re: Al Taglio dough fermentation
« Reply #5 on: October 10, 2021, 11:31:54 PM »
I agree to what our friends said above, and I would also add that if you're using a home fridge, 72H CF may be a little bit too long as those equipment are not very steady, meaning the cold of your home fridge is not as cold as a commercial one should be. That's to say 72H in your home fridge could look like 96H or more in a commercial one (numbers just to illustrate the idea).

Such a long fermentation in a not-so-cold environment will result in a weaker gluten structure, which could be resolved by a couple folding before the proofing; however the next problem will be the yeast amount: after folding, you need to give time to your dough so the gluten can relax, meantime it also needs to proof (inflate), and it's possible that there's already not enough sugar for the yeast, not enough fermentation strength for inflating.

But there's only one way to verify ! So if I were you, in order to make this test correctly I'd make 6 dough balls:
-> 2 for each 24/48/72H
Each day:
-> 1 without folding
-> 1 with folding

That could also be interesting to note in each case how long a proofing before baking is needed at RT (in theory, I'd say that is goes decreasing, 24+4 or 5, 48+3 or 4, 72+2 or 3...).
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