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Author Topic: is it possible to decipher this label into a pizza dough recipe?  (Read 597 times)

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Offline Yael

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Re: is it possible to decipher this label into a pizza dough recipe?
« Reply #20 on: October 13, 2021, 04:45:26 AM »
From what I've heard, it seems that thicker pizza styles like Sicilian and grandma benefit more from the ascorbic acid than thin crust styles. I have yet to produce a thick crust pizza that I'm at all happy with, but I keep my eyes open for flours with ascorbic acid, so that I can see how that works out.

In China, there are a couple flours with AA, and also many dough conditioners easily available, so I had my fair share of using it. AA will help your dough inflating, inflating, inflating... almost without deflating! Good for bread products! But for hand stretching, it's a nightmare, dough breaks easily. I gives a good oven spring though (FWIW I talked about it here: https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=64322.0).
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Offline Yael

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Re: is it possible to decipher this label into a pizza dough recipe?
« Reply #21 on: October 13, 2021, 04:50:17 AM »
To comply with the FDA's rules and regulations regarding ingredients statements, the ingredients are supposed to be listed by their weights, in descending order.[...]

As for the Sunflower Oil, which is recited last in the statement, there can't be very much of it.
[...]

Yeah, the descending order in this list is weird.
And because of that, about sunflower oil, I think it's powered oil that we can find in those mix packagings (oil will prevent flour from flying everywhere when opening the bag).
“Learn the rules like a pro so you can break them like an artist” - Pablo Picasso

Offline RHawthorne

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Re: is it possible to decipher this label into a pizza dough recipe?
« Reply #22 on: October 13, 2021, 04:27:40 PM »
In China, there are a couple flours with AA, and also many dough conditioners easily available, so I had my fair share of using it. AA will help your dough inflating, inflating, inflating... almost without deflating! Good for bread products! But for hand stretching, it's a nightmare, dough breaks easily. I gives a good oven spring though (FWIW I talked about it here: https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=64322.0).
Then I guess it might work well for a no knead dough with highish hydration, one whole ball for one Sicilian or grandma pie.
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Offline QwertyJuan

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Re: is it possible to decipher this label into a pizza dough recipe?
« Reply #23 on: October 13, 2021, 10:26:20 PM »
In China, there are a couple flours with AA, and also many dough conditioners easily available, so I had my fair share of using it. AA will help your dough inflating, inflating, inflating... almost without deflating! Good for bread products! But for hand stretching, it's a nightmare, dough breaks easily. I gives a good oven spring though (FWIW I talked about it here: https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=64322.0).

NO issues stretching with AA if your dough is properly fermented and it's a high enough hydration. At low hydrations? Absolutely... it's a MONSTER... but at 68-70% hydration? No issues. And YES... puffy cornicione!! :D

Offline RHawthorne

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Re: is it possible to decipher this label into a pizza dough recipe?
« Reply #24 on: October 13, 2021, 10:29:47 PM »
NO issues stretching with AA if your dough is properly fermented and it's a high enough hydration. At low hydrations? Absolutely... it's a MONSTER... but at 68-70% hydration? No issues. And YES... puffy cornicione!! :D
It makes a dough that stretches more easily with higher hydration rates than with low ones? That's a new one on me. Now I'm really intrigued.
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Offline QwertyJuan

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Re: is it possible to decipher this label into a pizza dough recipe?
« Reply #25 on: October 13, 2021, 10:47:41 PM »
It makes a dough that stretches more easily with higher hydration rates than with low ones? That's a new one on me. Now I'm really intrigued.

I'm not saying that the AA does this... my dough, using Super Keynote is a BEAST to stretch at anything lower than 65-66% hydration... once I'm up in the 68% and higher range?? NO issues. I'm guessing it's more to do with that fact that I am definately at the upper limit of my flour's hydration limit. Either way... the dough stretches VERY easily at high hydrations and is a PIG at low hydration. Like... almost unstretchable at low hydrations.

Offline Yael

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Re: is it possible to decipher this label into a pizza dough recipe?
« Reply #26 on: October 13, 2021, 11:28:46 PM »
Yes exactly, the strength it gives is balanced with the extensibility resulting from the high hydration.
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Offline RHawthorne

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Re: is it possible to decipher this label into a pizza dough recipe?
« Reply #27 on: October 14, 2021, 12:34:28 AM »
I'm not saying that the AA does this... my dough, using Super Keynote is a BEAST to stretch at anything lower than 65-66% hydration... once I'm up in the 68% and higher range?? NO issues. I'm guessing it's more to do with that fact that I am definately at the upper limit of my flour's hydration limit. Either way... the dough stretches VERY easily at high hydrations and is a PIG at low hydration. Like... almost unstretchable at low hydrations.
Do you mean that the dough is too elastic and snaps back, or tears easily? I find it very easy to stretch doughs in the 58% to 62% hydration range, with no such issues, if that's what you mean. Either you've just gotten used to working with a high hydration rate, or there's something pretty different between the flours we use...or at least that's all I can figure. 
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Offline QwertyJuan

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Re: is it possible to decipher this label into a pizza dough recipe?
« Reply #28 on: October 14, 2021, 09:46:08 PM »
Do you mean that the dough is too elastic and snaps back, or tears easily? I find it very easy to stretch doughs in the 58% to 62% hydration range, with no such issues, if that's what you mean. Either you've just gotten used to working with a high hydration rate, or there's something pretty different between the flours we use...or at least that's all I can figure.

There is NO possible way, I could make a 60% hydration pizza dough with my Super Keynote. I'm not sure I could stretch it without it ripping. And not ripping because it's weak... but ripping because you'd have to have the forearms of Arnold in his prime to stetch it. It's SOOOO hard to describe. I've used Ardent Mills AP, I've used Ardent Mills Keynote. I've used Ardent Mills Pizza flour. But the Super Keynote is a beast. And the only way to get it so it's easy to stretch is to hydrate it. With oil, I'm at 68% right now. And that is actually down... I WAS at 70% but the last month or so, the flour appears to be more wet and I've read online that others are having the same issues with this years' wheat crops.

You may ask, if it's so hard to work with, why do you use it?? Because it makes the best crust. By far. Puffy, light, chewy, soft....

Here is an example... I will admit, this guy got a little carried away on the left hand side  :-D

But what that comes out of the oven, you can HEAR the crunch, but inside the crust it's almost strings because it's so soft. I cannot say enough good things about this flour.


Offline RHawthorne

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Re: is it possible to decipher this label into a pizza dough recipe?
« Reply #29 on: October 14, 2021, 10:22:36 PM »
There is NO possible way, I could make a 60% hydration pizza dough with my Super Keynote. I'm not sure I could stretch it without it ripping. And not ripping because it's weak... but ripping because you'd have to have the forearms of Arnold in his prime to stetch it. It's SOOOO hard to describe. I've used Ardent Mills AP, I've used Ardent Mills Keynote. I've used Ardent Mills Pizza flour. But the Super Keynote is a beast. And the only way to get it so it's easy to stretch is to hydrate it. With oil, I'm at 68% right now. And that is actually down... I WAS at 70% but the last month or so, the flour appears to be more wet and I've read online that others are having the same issues with this years' wheat crops.

You may ask, if it's so hard to work with, why do you use it?? Because it makes the best crust. By far. Puffy, light, chewy, soft....

Here is an example... I will admit, this guy got a little carried away on the left hand side  :-D

But what that comes out of the oven, you can HEAR the crunch, but inside the crust it's almost strings because it's so soft. I cannot say enough good things about this flour.
That pie does appear to have very good aeration in the rim.
If we're not questioning the reason for our existence, then what the hell are we doing here?!

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