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Boosting your dough with some yeast is technically not necessary, but it gives the dough predictability, something that both the occasional and the professional baker might need.

Whereas commercial yeast always works like clockwork and there are minor deviations in proofing unless you've made mistakes with your recipe, starters are far more finicky.

 In the starter world, 1+1 is not always 2. It might even be a lot less than 2 if you don't know your starter well. Book recipes for starter doughs are always a good guess at how to help a less experienced baker get the results he needs, in a way.

 In the commercial yeast world, 1+1 is  always bigger than 2, you always have that extra horsepower under your foot to get you there on time.

In a bakery (less so in a pizza shop) you can always  handle a bad day with your starter by managing temperatures. You have the equipment and that, when you make bread and pizza doughs, is a huge advantage. It's far more difficult to do at home.

In conclusion, lacing your biga dough with some commercial yeast will give it predictability and additional horsepower, without greatly affecting taste if you keep the dosage low. It's your call as a baker / pizzaiolo to do so. If you're experienced, it's never a yes or a no, it's always a maybe.

 It's exactly like the pilot who loads extra fuel for the flight because he has flown the route many times and he knows in today's weather it might be helpful.

Hope this helps.

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Neapolitan Style / Re: Pizza Canotto with Biga
« Last post by plusacht on Today at 02:04:39 AM »
Trying my best here - now a 100% biga after kneading in kitchen aid. Doesnít look like in the video. Maybe the reason is that I used the biga right out of the fridge instead of room temperature? So it looks to me not really combined. Hydration is 65% but it was a mess when I tried to shape it. Not sure maybe even go down to 63%?
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Shop Talk / Re: Starting a Pizzeria with low budget
« Last post by jose9989 on Yesterday at 11:55:47 PM »
Sharing a mixer may be problematic if there is overlapping need.  Why not buy a used one so you donít have to risk a conflict?

That problem solved itself. I am taking over the bakery :)
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Shop Talk / Re: Starting a Pizzeria with low budget
« Last post by jose9989 on Yesterday at 11:54:55 PM »
The person who owns the bakery wants to sell it off, so I am going to buy it convert the whole thing into a pizzeria. This worked out very well for me because there is a lot of equipment in there which I can use; including a single deck gas pizza oven!

I have experience working with conveyors and was setting up my sourdough detroit style dough to match it; Confused on if I should chuck the existing oven and get conveyor or just start learning how to use a deck oven.
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Shop Talk / Buying a bakery to convert into detroit style pizzeria; Conveyor?
« Last post by jose9989 on Yesterday at 11:34:53 PM »
Hello,

I am going to buy a bakery with a single deck oven to make detroit style sourdough pizza.

Should I buy a conveyor or just start off with the existing single deck and try to manage? I have no idea how much volume to expect so starting off I am planning just to have pick ups and walk ins (no delivery). It is a small town though.

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Neapolitan Style / Re: The Doughs of My Life
« Last post by DoouBall on Yesterday at 09:48:27 PM »
It was a bad dough day, but there was pizza.

You know considering your circumstances, the pizza still looks very good!

A couple of considerations wtih Petra 5063. One is that the flour has very high enzyme activity. I tried to autolyse with this flour for just one hour and the dough turned very liquiidy. Two is that the flour is designed for 8-10 hour rise at room temp or 24h rise in the fridge. See the datasheet here:

https://www.farinapetra.it/SCHEDATEC/?permalink=petra-5063

This flour just doesn't seem very forgiving in my experience. If you ferment too long, waiting for the sourdough to rise, the enzyme activity may deteriorate your dough too much before baking. If your starter is acting sluggish, you might consider adding a bit of instant yeast to the mix. Yes, it will reduce the flavor a bit but it will help you get the results you're used to from a rise and texture standpoint.
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Pizza Toppings / Re: Favorite Cupping Pepperoni?
« Last post by bigMoose on Yesterday at 09:39:27 PM »
 For me, Ezzo Supreme Special (SS) is the best, followed by  Hormel Rosa Grande.  I like the spice package in Ezzo SS a bit better.
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Greeting,

This question might allready be answered but i colud not look through all 74 pages without getting hungry.

I just got a g3 ferrari delizia. And i want to replace the stone for a better one and also  i am going to eliminate the bottom heating element and get another round one for the top.

Where could I purchase thes two things (better stone, round heating element to add to the top?
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Home Ovens / Portable Outdoor Gas Pizza oven
« Last post by tdi-gorilla on Yesterday at 09:22:24 PM »
Has anyone seen this propane fuel pizza oven and have any feedback as to how well it works?

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0953STS1R/?tag=pmak-20


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Hi Rolls. 
I am having the same question as you had.  Is additional yeast required after mixing dough with the Biga.  And like you I have seen reputable chefs doing it both ways.   
Have you learnt anything more and would you now advise adding additional yeast or just using the Biga only?

Hi Arnaud,

As mentioned in my older post, there really aren't any rules set in stone regarding the use of additional yeast in the final mix.  Even in the recipes of Piergiorgio Giorilli, you'll see some requiring additional yeast while others don't.  The important thing to consider is that the final dough reaches an optimal level of fermentation when it's ready for baking. If your final product hits the trifecta of proper visual appeal, taste and texture, you'll know that your formula and workflow are on point, irrespective of whether or not any additional yeast was used.

My suggestion is still to follow the formula and workflow of an established source.  In my own personal baking, I use biga mostly in bread dough and add some yeast in the final dough mix based on the REMAINING flour weight in the formula.


Rolls 
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