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Author Topic: Par-baking Stuffed Crust Pizza or Proofed Dough?  (Read 180 times)

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Offline spicypepperoni

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Par-baking Stuffed Crust Pizza or Proofed Dough?
« on: September 22, 2021, 12:35:38 AM »
Hey everyone - I have been working towards opening up my own pizza shop (hopefully soon), and I have been reading up on how pizzerias will par-bake the dough to have faster cook times once customers order. I understand how it would work for a standard hand-tossed kind of dough but how does that work for more complex dough types like a proofed dough (like pan) or stuffed crust with cheese? Would the airiness/bounce get lost in par-baking it? Would the cheese in the stuff crust get gross after being melted and then re-melted?

If anyone has any ideas on if these are actually concerns or ways around them, I would really enjoy hearing your thoughts. Par-baking seems like such a good options but I don't want the ability to turn out fast pizzas to compromise the quality of the pie.

LMK :)

- JB

In pizza we trust  :pizza: :chef: lol

Offline amolapizza

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Re: Par-baking Stuffed Crust Pizza or Proofed Dough?
« Reply #1 on: September 22, 2021, 03:43:41 AM »
I don't know anything about American thick crust pizza, nor about stuffed crust.

What I can say is that for Italian thick crust pizza, it's an advantage to par bake as you get more oven spring and a better crust structure as it's not weighted down by toppings.  It also gives you more crunch which is often appreciated.
Jack

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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Par-baking Stuffed Crust Pizza or Proofed Dough?
« Reply #2 on: September 22, 2021, 10:14:33 AM »
Hey everyone - I have been working towards opening up my own pizza shop (hopefully soon), and I have been reading up on how pizzerias will par-bake the dough to have faster cook times once customers order. I understand how it would work for a standard hand-tossed kind of dough but how does that work for more complex dough types like a proofed dough (like pan) or stuffed crust with cheese? Would the airiness/bounce get lost in par-baking it? Would the cheese in the stuff crust get gross after being melted and then re-melted?

If anyone has any ideas on if these are actually concerns or ways around them, I would really enjoy hearing your thoughts. Par-baking seems like such a good options but I don't want the ability to turn out fast pizzas to compromise the quality of the pie.
JB,

I don't know if it will help, but you might take a look at the following posts by the late Tom Lehmann that pertain to par-baking pan doughs:

https://thinktank.pmq.com/t/pan-pizza-procedures/15035

Reply 4 at https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=56456.msg567853;topicseen#msg567853

Reply 3 at https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=46336.msg464899;topicseen#msg464899

Reply 5 at https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=50239.msg505692;topicseen#msg505692

Reply 15 at https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=46336.msg465157;topicseen#msg465157

Reply 2 at https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=52384.msg527623;topicseen#msg527623

Reply 4 at https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=50094.msg503795;topicseen#msg503795

And this post by me for a standard par-baked crust:

Reply 129 at https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=576.msg10061#msg10061

Peter


Offline PizzaGarage

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Re: Par-baking Stuffed Crust Pizza or Proofed Dough?
« Reply #3 on: September 22, 2021, 05:04:18 PM »
You can reduce prep time after order and speed services with Pan pizza by panning the dough and putting into the fridge at 45-46 degrees after proofing.  The risen dough will look like it has collapsed a bit while in the fridge.  Once it bakes however the rise comes right back, in addition for some reason I haven't been able to figure out is the crust more tender as well.  Have not tried this with a stuffed crust (assuming you mean at the edge) but if you prep it, let is rise  (if you let those rise) and put it in the fridge you should be in good shape.  Something to try.  This will carve out time on the prep line and get things going much faster in a very big way.  Also, by leveraging the cold temps you get total control over dough and don't have to worry about room temps and hot areas.  I use cold temperature and time to get control over those elements to create a far more consistent product and speed production at the same time.

You can try the method above and also the par bake to see which you prefer.  I do par bake on cracker crusts and panned thins and the crusts come out excellent. 

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