A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Author Topic: How do you proof your dough?  (Read 439 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Tayyab123

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 86
  • Location: Birmingham, UK
  • I Love Pizza!
How do you proof your dough?
« on: May 22, 2022, 06:28:43 PM »
Hi

I want to know..

What is the best method for dough proofing.

I have seen that generally that pizza shops in my city are winging it and proofing the dough at whatever temperature the room is in until it "looks right". Is that how most of you here are doing it or are you using some machinery that controls the temperature so you can maintain real consistency in your product?

Let me know guys!

Online Pizza_Not_War

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 2991
  • Location: Portland OR
Re: How do you proof your dough?
« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2022, 06:57:27 PM »
My pizza dough proofs in fridge until 2 hours before use. Easiest and most consistent method I've used over the years.

Offline 02ebz06

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 7374
  • Location: Rio Rancho, NM USA
Re: How do you proof your dough?
« Reply #2 on: May 23, 2022, 09:56:06 AM »
My pizza dough proofs in fridge until 2 hours before use. Easiest and most consistent method I've used over the years.

+1
Used to do 72hr in fridge, but recently made some changes and now do 96hr in fridge than 2 hour RT before baking.
Bruce here... My cooking toys --> FGM 800-B Pizza Oven, Pellet Grill, Pellet Smoker, Propane Griddle, Propane Grill

Offline Swinger-mike

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 261
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: How do you proof your dough?
« Reply #3 on: May 23, 2022, 11:23:22 AM »

What is the best method for dough proofing.


The one that makes the best tasting pizza to YOU!

Offline Heikjo

  • Lifetime Member
  • *
  • Posts: 1236
  • Location: Oslo, Norway
  • Sour dough = happy me
Re: How do you proof your dough?
« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2022, 04:36:51 PM »
There's no "best", just different ones. The important part is to acheive a well fermented dough. I do however prefer one that has been fermenting for some time to develop flavor.

I've been partial to RT fermentation (16C+) since I've been using sourdough for a long time, which I've never really tried putting in the fridge. I use more IDY these days, but stick to the 16C fermentation. I get 16C by using a small wine cooler (room for six bottles).

Some make their own fermentation boxes with ice, insulation and whatever they need to create a controlled and repeatable environment.

The easiest for most is probably the fridge, either exclusively or in combination with some time in RT. It gives you a lot of control and a wide windowspan where the dough is useable. One dough can be good for several days in a fridge, while in RT a few hours can be the difference between success and failure.
Heine
Oven: Effeuno P134H

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Offline Tayyab123

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 86
  • Location: Birmingham, UK
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: How do you proof your dough?
« Reply #5 on: May 23, 2022, 05:56:35 PM »
Ok, are any of you cooking pan pizzas?

I feel the risk here is not knowing how many pizza may sell in a day and therefore not taking out enough dough balls to allow them to proof at RT and have them ready to be baked.

Imagine I took at 30 doughs which I anticipate to sell however demand is higher and then I've got dough that's not ready to be baked and order waiting to be dispatched.

I'm looking for a method where we can cook straight out the fridge?

I'd be looking to stretch the dough in to the pans prior to putting them in the fridge.. does anyone do this?

Offline Loarina Vega

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 222
  • Age: 54
  • Location: York Pa
  • I Love Fried Dough Pizza
Re: How do you proof your dough?
« Reply #6 on: May 23, 2022, 09:22:40 PM »
Tonight at 9 o'clock I make my Poolish Which will stay at room temperature all night   The following day I will make a batch around 10 30 11 o'clock in the morning it's a 15 pound batch I will add. 2.    22 oz  dough balls That  they were from the last batch. Old Dough Procerdure  which goes for a little bit of the flavor the dough these are I think around 72 to 80 hours CF.  ... After the 7 minute making dough  I'll let that room temperature rise about an hour and start panning my half sheets  Which are 32 oz of dough  I will run a docker Lightly oil and Saranwrap they will stay there until 9 o'clock at night where I do the Par bake at only 5 minutes when they're completely cool I will re saranwrap  And they will be in the walkin ready to be sauced cheese the toppings from the refrigerator it's a par bake and they could be used the next day Up to 3 days very convenient  I'm a small market stand Lori V's Pizza Central Market York PA

Offline PizzaGarage

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 681
  • Location: Chicago
Re: How do you proof your dough?
« Reply #7 on: May 25, 2022, 03:51:14 PM »
I keep dough under control and use temperature to manage at all stages.


 
Fermentation  - 72 hours at 36 degrees, ball directly after mixing and into temperature control

Panned Pizza (Chicago)

Proofing - 1.5 hours at 90 degree in humidity controlled warmers.
Pans move directly to 36 degrees after proofing - pulled and baked on demand from fridge

Thins

Proofing - 1 - 1.5 hours same technique as above
Balls move to 50-55 degree refrigeration overridden with temperature control modules
I use a sheeter so this temp may not apply to you.

If hand forming, you can keep balls at about 60-65 (you would have to figure that out) might be closer to 65 or a tad more.  You can compensate for hot rooms by overriding refrigeration temps to keep your dough balls at a consistent temperate to create a more consistent product and reduce waste as much as possible.

RT creates inconsistent products in my view if you enable it in any of the dough management processes.

« Last Edit: May 25, 2022, 04:01:11 PM by PizzaGarage »

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


 

wordpress