Pizza Making Forum

Pizza Making => American Style => Topic started by: xPHmgr on January 19, 2004, 08:35:49 PM

Title: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: xPHmgr on January 19, 2004, 08:35:49 PM
I just finished eating my first attempt at a Pizza Hut pan pizza.  It actually turned out really well.  I am kind of surprised.

Here is the recipe that I used for the crust.

1 1/2 cup water
2 teaspoon active dry yeast (Fleischmann's)
3 tablespoons powdered milk
22 1/2 ounces (or 4 1/2 cups) bread flour
1 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon sugar
2 Tablespoons vegetable oil

In a stand mixer (KitchenAid) fitted with dough hook, add the water, yeast and powdered milk.  Mix thoroughly until yeast has fully dissolved.  Mix the remaining dry ingredients together in a separate container and added them to the mixer.  Mix on low (speed 2) until most of the flour and water have mixed, then continue kneading for 10 minutes.  The dough will be loose and scrappy at first and will quickly form a moist, smooth cohesive ball (while the dough was scrappy I added the oil one tablespoon at a time).  While the dough is kneading, add 4oz vegetable oil to a 14" pan style pizza pan and make sure the oil completely covers all of the bottom surface area.  After the dough has been kneaded for 10 minutes, remove it and roll it out to be about 3/4" thick and about 12" around (I ended up only using 29 1/2oz of the dough for the crust and saved the remainder for another pizza some other time).  Place the dough in the pan and cover tightly with something (I used a large plastic cutting board. At Pizza Hut we used a plastic disk that was slightly larger than the pan).  Let the dough rise until it has filled the entire pan and is now about 1 1/2" thick.  Place the pan (still covered) into the refrigerator for at least 4 hours (I made mine the next evening about 24 hours later).  Remove from the refrigerator and top like you would any other pizza crust.  I baked it at 500 degrees on a pizza stone for 14 minutes.  The oven was preheated for about 40 minutes prior to the pizza going in.

Enjoy!

I'll add some pictures shortly...
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: xPHmgr on January 19, 2004, 08:36:32 PM
Pic
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: xPHmgr on January 19, 2004, 08:37:07 PM
another pic
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: xPHmgr on January 19, 2004, 08:38:53 PM
It really is not as done as it looks.  The picture came out really dark.  It tasted just like Pizza Hut pan pizza.  BTW: the black on the pizza is sliced black olives.
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: xPHmgr on January 19, 2004, 08:41:22 PM
slice...
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: canadave on January 19, 2004, 11:59:55 PM
Wow....how did that bad boy taste???? :o

--Dave
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: xPHmgr on January 20, 2004, 12:23:53 AM
Just like a Pizza Hut pan pizza!  It was wonderful!  My son who really likes Pizza Hut's pan pizza said that he liked it even better than theirs.  I think it was because it was right out of the oven instead of delivered in a humidified bag.
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Wayne on January 20, 2004, 01:16:54 AM
Wow it looks really great.  Thanks for postin it.  I'm going to make one this weekend, or heck I might do it tomorrow.  I've always been a big fan of pizza huts pan pizza.  It's not as good as it used to be, but still one of my favorites.
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Wayne on January 20, 2004, 01:21:23 AM
Oh, also, you cooked the pizza in a pan on the pizza stone?
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Steve on January 20, 2004, 07:46:31 AM
Looks great!!  ;D
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: canadave on January 20, 2004, 10:32:01 AM
And while we're all asking questions....what kind/brand of cheese did you use? :)

--Dave
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: DKM on January 20, 2004, 10:57:02 AM
The Pizza Hitt pan was my orginal favorite pizza and still is my favorite from a 'fast food' pizza chain.

Thanks I'll schedule it for next Tuesday or Wednesday.

Have 3 pizzas to try over the next week.

DKM
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: xPHmgr on January 20, 2004, 11:21:38 AM
Yes, I cooked it in the pan placed on the pizza stone.  I have the stone on the lowest rack in the oven and preheated the oven at 500 degrees for about 40 minutes before cooking it.
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: xPHmgr on January 20, 2004, 11:25:17 AM
I used Stella's shredded low moisture part skim mozzarella cheese from Sam's.
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pierre on January 23, 2004, 05:17:32 PM
looks just like the Pizza Hut pan pizza served here in Germany & France. Just that the dough is a tad thicker/ higher.

The best Pizza Hut I ever visited is in France, in Valle' de Noisé (just east of Paris) and serves the best pan pizza I ever ate. The sauce is much more distinctive. The spices in the sauce are just better proportioned. A really great pan pizza.  ;D Obviously there are regional differences. Before my visit there I always thought that the sauce is made the same everywhere (premanufactured, packaged and shipped).

I tried to recreate their pan pizza a few times and found the recipes I used too sweet and too dense. But I think I'll give xPHmgr's recipe a try since the results in pictures sure look very good. Interesting: Glad to see xPHmgr's usage of weighed cups, Thanks.


Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pierre on January 23, 2004, 05:23:02 PM
I guess the powdered milk (or whey) is added to get the crust browner?

Or does it serve another purpose (for flavor or texture)?

Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: xPHmgr on January 23, 2004, 06:04:23 PM
I do not know the purpose of the powdered milk, I just remembered that they used it.

As for the thickness of the dough, if you let it rise more before putting it into the refrigerator that should do the trick.  I may have "rushed" it a little.

We made the sauce in the store.  We used tomato sauce and premixed packages of spices.  I don't know if the sauce is made the same way now or anything about the sauce in any other country other than the US.
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Randy on January 23, 2004, 06:31:43 PM
It does look tasty.  Now I have one more pizza to add to my list to try.

Nice pizza.  Nice pictures.

Randy
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: itsinthesauce on January 23, 2004, 08:03:30 PM
XPH, great job! What does the powdered milk do to the recipe?
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: xPHmgr on January 23, 2004, 09:09:49 PM
I'm not sure what it does all I know is that when I worked for Pizza Hut they added some powdered milk to their pan pizza dough.

So I basically took the NY style recipe from this site and changed it to use vegetable oil like they used and added some powdered milk.

The pizza turned out great.  I will try another one this next week just to see if it was a fluke or if it is a reliable recipe.  I'll let you all know what I find out.
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: canadave on January 24, 2004, 02:50:01 AM
This may be a stupid question, but is "vegetable oil" the same as "olive oil"?  If not, what's the purpose of using the v. oil instead of the o. oil?

Dave
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Wayne on January 24, 2004, 03:07:25 AM
I made a batch of dough today which I will use tomorrow to make a pizza according to this recipe.  I don't know what caused this, but the dough had a different texture than when I normally make pizza.  If anyone has mad emozerella using the kit from new england cheesemaking, think of how the cheese feels after you tak eit out of the microwave the last time and knead it for awhile.  It was like that.  Very smooth and dense.  Also stronger than usual.  I liked the texture and am anxious to see how the finished product will come out.  I'll let you know how it tastes.  Wish I had a digicam so I could post a comparison photo.  

Oh and does anyone else find removablr bottom deep dish pans a bit troublesome when it comes to oiling them?  Mine alway sleaks a bit out of the bottom.  I had to cover t with a layer of plastic wrap, then aluminum foil, then more plastic wrap because it left a huge puddle of vegetable oil on the table.  And judging from the bottom of the crusts in pizza huts pan pizzas, I would say they use alot of oil per pan.  I hope mine doesn't leak too much more.  It would be a shame.  Anyway I'm gonna be dreaming of pizza tonight, and eating it tomorrow.  Only time will tell I suppose.
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: xPHmgr on January 24, 2004, 09:29:25 AM
Vegetable oil is different from olive oil.  I read the ingredients on the lable from the bottle that is marketed as "All Natural Pure Vegetable Oil" and all it has is soybean oil.  So, I guess what I used was really soybean oil.  Now I am wondering if there are different "vegetable oils"...

The pans that we used at Pizza Hut did not have removable bottoms.  The amount of oil that we used to oil the pans before putting the dough in the pan was 1 oz for small, 2 oz for medium and 3 oz for large.  I have a very large pan so I used 4 oz.  I would adjust the amount of oil to the size of pan that you are using.  I don't remember what sizes the small medium and large pizzas were at Pizza Hut.

 I don't know how this will come out in a removable bottom pan and I would think it would be a mess both out of and in the oven.  Let us know how it turns out though.
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pierre on January 24, 2004, 07:03:41 PM
I did some research on the milk powder, here's what I found out:

The milk powder (or whey powder) is used to induce the browning effect (or maillard reaction).

Whey is high in lactose (milk sugar), which has a very low sweetness value, but significantly contributes to crust color development. So, by adding whey to your dough formula, you can get crust color development without unwanted sweetness.

If you want that browning effect that sugar usually produces but not the sweetness then try adding up to 3 percent whey, based upon the flour weight to your dough. Reduce the sugar or leave it out.

Most likely added by pizza hut to keep the baking time shorter and still get the browning effect for the dough.
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: DKM on January 25, 2004, 08:32:33 PM
This is back on the schedule for Wednesday.  I'm really looking forward to it.

DKM
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Wayne on January 25, 2004, 09:33:25 PM
WellI made one saturday and overall it came out great.  I really liked the texture of the dough, although I had 2 problems with my pizza that were completely unrelated to the dough recipe.

1.  I cooked it a bit too long (not burnt, just a little overdone).  The bottom was dark brown instead of golden brown.  I was paranoid that the middle wasn't cooking so I left it in for almost 20 minutes.  Well now I know better for th enext one.

2.  I used Hunts seasoned tomato sauce for pizzas as the base for my sauce this time.  All I can say about this product is  ...DISGUSTING...  I went ahead and used th esauce but it was probably the worst pizza sauce I have ever made.  I'm going to stick to my usual recipe next time and go for the perfect pan pizza.

Aside from these 2 things, the pizza came out very good.  I used pepperoni, mushrooms, and mild italian sausage for the toppings (and cheese of course).  Next time I will probably use at least 5 different meats.  But all in all I can't wait to try the recipe again.  This is definatly one of my favorite recipes now.  So glad you posted it.
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: xPHmgr on January 26, 2004, 10:42:59 AM
I made another one on Sunday and it came out good but not as good as the first one did.  I changed three things:

 1. It was not the first pizza cooked ( I had some friends over and they wanted thin and not the pan so I cooked 2 medium thins and a small hand tossed first).

 2. I used more ingredients on this one (last time I just used cheese, peperonni, diced ham and black olive).

 3. I made the dough the previous day (about 24 hour time in the refrigerator and this time it was in the refrigerator only 4 hours).

I used cheese, peperonni, canadian bacon, ground beef (precooked, rinsed and drained), onion, mushroom and black olive to top it.  I used about the amount we would have a Pizza Hut possible just a tad more and I noticed it had standing moisture in the middle.

I cooked it for about 12 minutes and it was ready to come out from the crust color perspective.  I might have been able to keep it in the oven for another minute but probably not much longer than that.

I think next time I am thinking about only putting in 1 tablespoon of powdered milk and see if I can cook it longer (maybe 15 minutes or so) to get rid of some of the extra moisture.

Does that sound reasonable?

Also, I used the extra dough as a New York style crust and I was able to stretch it out fairly thin and some friends said that it tasted great.  I don't know if it was or wasn't good because I did not get a piece of it.
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Randy on January 26, 2004, 11:52:11 AM
It could be the moisture is coming from the olives and the onions if you added to many.
What temp was the oven?

Randy
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Steve on January 26, 2004, 12:17:52 PM
What type of cheese are you using?

Whole Milk Mozzarella will cause a lot of excess water. I always use part-skim low-moisture mozzarella.
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: xPHmgr on January 26, 2004, 12:29:13 PM
I cooked the pizza at 500 degrees.  The oven had been on for about an hour and a half by the time the pan pizza went in but I did cook 3 other pizzas before the pan pizza.

I only used about 15 or so onion pieces (onion halved and then slice in 3/16" or so slices).  The black olives that i used I made sure they were not excessively wet.  The amounts were pretty much the same that we would have put on a super supreme pizza at Pizza Hut.

I used low moisture mozerella.  I like the way the cheese comes out of the oven but do not like how it is when a piece is reheated in the oven.  It seems to loose it's stringyness.

Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Randy on January 26, 2004, 12:35:37 PM
Do you think 500 is a bit high for a thick crust.

Randy
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: DKM on January 26, 2004, 12:45:29 PM
I would try around 450.

DKM
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: xPHmgr on January 26, 2004, 11:05:33 PM
Thanks!  I'll try 450 next time and I'll leave the recipe as it is and see what happens.
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Wayne on February 02, 2004, 12:12:23 AM
I made another pan pizza this weekend.  Did everythign the same except...

Only use about 3/4 of the dough.  The remaining dough made 2 smaller pizzas.

Lowered the heat to 450 degrees.

I must say it came out just about perfect.  The crust was crispy and golden on the outside and soft on the inside.  There was no burntness to it anywhere.  

For toppings I used mushrooms, black olives, peperoni, mild italian sausage, and bacon.

This was one of the best pizzas I've ever made, and one of the best I've ever had in my life.  I will not be makign another until I get a pan without a removable bottom though because it makes a big mess.
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pierre on February 23, 2004, 04:18:55 PM
Thanks!  I'll try 450 next time and I'll leave the recipe as it is and see what happens.

did you ever get back to making another pan pizza? Were you able to repeat the good results you had with the first Pan Pizza you made?

Wayne seems to be very happy with the results....
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: xPHmgr on February 26, 2004, 10:59:13 PM
I made it the same that I did the first time and it came out great.  I think the issue with the second pizza was too many ingredients which made it come out more watery in the center than I like.  When we made pan pizzas at PH I remember having the same issue if we used too many vegetables.

At this point I am going to keep the recipe as it is.  Both the first and last pizza that I made using this recipe I prepared the dough the day before and made it the next evening.  I will continue to do that too.

Give it a try.  Enjoy!
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Steve on February 27, 2004, 07:40:48 AM
Would you mind if I used your pan pizza recipe on the main website? I'll be sure to cite you as the source of the recipe.  8)
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: stock on February 27, 2004, 10:36:11 AM
i've always been a fan of pizza hut pan pizza, and so i'm eager to try this.  now if only i could speed up the rate at which i cook so i could have pizza more often.  as it is, i usually spend about an hour and forty-five minutes fiddling around with the pizza from the time i begin shaping the dough to the time i start eating the finished product
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: xPHmgr on February 29, 2004, 02:44:38 PM
Would you mind if I used your pan pizza recipe on the main website? I'll be sure to cite you as the source of the recipe.  8)

Nope.  I used one of the recipes I got from this site as a base and so it would only be fitting to be included.

I hope everyone enjoys it!
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: YoMomma on March 02, 2004, 09:17:46 AM
I tried this recipe yesterday and everyone agreed it is REALLY good.  I had to mess w/ it though, as I couldn't bring myself to put 4 oz of oil in the pan - afterall too much oil is my main complaint w/ ph pan pizza.  It was still way more oil than I have ever added to a crust and I believe it is what made it as crispy & tastey as it was.  I baked mine in my commercial Blodgett convection oven (w/ a wicked powerful fan) at 400 degrees for just less than 10 minutes.  This is a keeper!  Thanks for sharing.
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Steve on March 02, 2004, 10:56:49 AM
xPHmgr,

Your're now a celebrity!  8)

http://www.pizzamaking.com/panpizza.php

Let me know if you'd like for me to use your real name or make any changes.  :)
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: DKM on March 02, 2004, 12:02:17 PM
Steve,

Are you going to update any of the other recipes?

DKM
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Steve on March 02, 2004, 01:09:54 PM
Steve,

Are you going to update any of the other recipes?

DKM

DKM,

Yes, I am planning to add your Chicago style recipe to the main site (giving you full credit, of course) and I have tweaked the thin crust recipe slightly (your name appears at the bottom that that page). I have lots of plans for the website... lots of new information that we've been tossing around on the forum needs to be put on the main website.

Does anyone want to volunteer to create a page or two? All I need is the raw text and I can insert it (and photos) into the new page.

I'd like to create a page about the history of pizza, a page devoted to each ingredient, etc...
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: DKM on March 02, 2004, 04:27:00 PM
I’ll work on a couple if you want.  E-mail me.

DKM
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pierre on March 04, 2004, 03:22:32 PM
Ditto....  if you need some help, let me know Steve.

Pierre
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pierre on March 07, 2004, 04:27:49 PM
Finally made a Pan Pizza. Baked it in a 14" pan. Made a whopping Lumber Jack portion.

Never thought about using a New York dough recipe for a pan pizza, but the results were very good. I always thought a lower protein flour would be better, but I was wrong.

I used the Canola oil (rape seed oil) that I mentioned in a posting further up. I found though that the taste of the oil was too predominate, probably because it's "NATIV" and not refined. The taste is just too nutty, much like unroasted sunflower seeds or a bit "greener" in taste. (It's the same mistake just like using "Virgin" olive oil instead of "Classico" or "mild".)

When I make it again, (and that is for sure) I will use a more neutral tasting vegetable oil, perhaps Corn oil.

Baked it also in the pan on the preheated stone for about 12 minutes. at 240° C.  

Pierre
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: stock on March 10, 2004, 10:54:22 AM
<snip>
Remove from the refrigerator and top like you would any other pizza crust.  I baked it at 500 degrees on a pizza stone for 14 minutes.  The oven was preheated for about 40 minutes prior to the pizza going in.

out of curiosity, is it a given that the dough is brought to room temperature after coming out of the refrigerator, or does it go straight from the refrigerator to being topped and baked?  thanks.
-scott
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: DKM on March 10, 2004, 05:04:55 PM
Good question.  At Pizza Inn we use to bring them up to room temp, but did use them straight out of the cooler a lot.

DKM
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: itsinthesauce on March 10, 2004, 06:01:54 PM
I've done it both ways and really can't tell the difference.
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Randy on March 10, 2004, 07:25:45 PM
Pierre you get the prize for the most symmetrical pizza.
Looks mighty tasty.
Randy
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: DKM on March 10, 2004, 09:08:38 PM
Making the dough in when the wife gets home.  Can't wait!
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: DKM on March 11, 2004, 02:17:01 PM
Cooked it and had it for Luch.  It was great.   :)

Thanks xPHmgr!

DKM

Who gets his new camera this weekend!
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pierre on March 12, 2004, 07:12:33 PM
Pierre you get the prize for the most symmetrical pizza.
Looks mighty tasty.
Randy

Thanks Randy, actually I wasn't even trying to get the toppings that symmetrical on the pizza, must have been an unconscious thought deep in my mind trying to create a perfect universe.... based on pizza molecules  :)

Pierre
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pierre on March 12, 2004, 07:20:17 PM
by the way Randy, your first try at DKMs Chicago style sure looks very tasty as well!!

With the weekend now up, I've got all kinds of Pizza dancing around in my head again ...  :D

Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pizza Problems on March 20, 2004, 10:35:23 PM
hey guys...u know where i can get the pan to bake the pizza hut pan pizza in...i only have the standard ones, not the pan ones. thanks.
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: xPHmgr on March 21, 2004, 01:32:35 PM
There are several sites on the internet that sell pan syle pizza pans or you could just use a good quality cake pan.  Take a look at a local restaurant supply store if you have one.  I picked up two 8" cake pans that work well for either Chicago style or Pan Style pizza.
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pizzacko on March 21, 2004, 07:38:41 PM
Hey! Where the heck can I get my hands on a pizza pan. I wanna try that recipe by xPHmgr cause I think Pizza Hut makes the best crusts. Anyways, all I keep finding are those flat, grey, teflon coated, $3.99 pans at Loblaws.
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: stock on March 21, 2004, 08:23:52 PM
Hey! Where the heck can I get my hands on a pizza pan. I wanna try that recipe by xPHmgr cause I think Pizza Hut makes the best crusts. Anyways, all I keep finding are those flat, grey, teflon coated, $3.99 pans at Loblaws.

a quick search on the web returned the following:
http://www.acemart.com/merchant.mv?Store_Code=AM&Screen=CTGY&Category_Code=G4-1 (http://www.acemart.com/merchant.mv?Store_Code=AM&Screen=CTGY&Category_Code=G4-1)
http://www.abestkitchen.com/store/pizzapans.html (http://www.abestkitchen.com/store/pizzapans.html)
http://www.katom.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=KRSI&Category_Code=SMWPZA (http://www.katom.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=KRSI&Category_Code=SMWPZA)

or, if you have a restaurant supply store near you, that would probably work as well.
-scott
*edit* spelling
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Foccaciaman on March 22, 2004, 10:50:06 AM
Gonna make a deep pan in my cast iron skillet this week.
I could have sworn I read someone else on the forum tried this?????

results forthcoming...
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pizzaholic on March 22, 2004, 12:27:57 PM
There are identical PH pans available from Hillware out of New Jersey. I got mine from a place in Michigan, it was the BEST money that I invested with the regard to pizza equipment. It is a dark metal that only needs to be oiled. Non stick type of coating. I will try to get more information on how to contact the company if needed.
Pizzaholic
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Foccaciaman on March 22, 2004, 06:12:27 PM
Upper crust a little burnt but delicious.
Actually used mix of two sauces one mixed with toppings and the diced tomato mixture on top with parmesean and italian breadcrumbs.  I am not sure where I saw the breadcrumbs thing but it is Sicilian, I think, it gives a great texture right on top of the sauce.

onions,green pepper,sweet peppers, pepperoni,sausage,mushrooms, provolone,mozzerella

I was actually shocked at how good it turned out. with exception of the edge.
Oh, and I used Extra Virgin and Canola mixed for the pan, good taste. ;D
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Randy on March 22, 2004, 08:16:42 PM
Adult beverage and hot peppers too I see.
Looks tatsty!
Randy
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pizzacko on March 22, 2004, 09:52:31 PM
Hey thanks guys... u know I think I learn more stuff in here than in a school. Anyways, I found a restaurant supplies store near me and I'm gonna go check em' out. Anyways, I appreciate the help. Thanks.

P.S.
You kick ass stock. Thanks fpr goin through the trouple to find the pans on the net. Appreciate it.
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: lucifer on May 25, 2004, 12:23:33 AM
Have learnt a lot lurking in this forum - it's great!

As cannot at this stage assist with recipes, I have enhanced the photo of the slice of pizza pictured earlier in this thread, to bring it up to life like colour level (i hope  :))
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Steve on May 25, 2004, 07:57:41 AM
Thanks, lucifer!  :)
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Foccaciaman on May 25, 2004, 09:18:32 AM
Come out of the shadows Lucifer all are welcome.
 ;D
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: That Damn Swede on June 02, 2005, 09:10:03 AM
Hey, I'm trying out this recipe as we speak. However, the dough will not rise after two hours at room temperature. Did you use cold water in your recipe? I assumed it was cold as you didn't mention anything else. Normally when you use dried powder yeast, you're supposed to use tempered water, at maybe 125F. I'm from Sweden, so I'm beginning to wonder if we have a different type of dried yeast powder over here...
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Randy on June 02, 2005, 10:33:43 AM
Place it in a warm place say 80F and it should work for you but next time try a water temperature of around 90F.

Hope this helps.

Randy
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: That Damn Swede on June 02, 2005, 11:18:11 AM
All right, thank you. I've placed the pizzas on top of my stove and they're slowly coming to life. Maybe you should add water temperature to the recipe.

Also, I wonder what's the purpose, if any, of placing the dough in the fridge for som many hours?

:)
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on June 02, 2005, 11:47:17 AM
The reason for the long period of refrigeration is mainly for flavor. Although the activity of the yeast slows down during refrigeration, it is still alive and produces alcohol and other byproducts of fermentation. Also, there is bacteria (e.g., lactobacillus) that also continue to function during refrigeration and produce a wide range of acids and other compounds that contribute to the flavor of the finished crust. You can usually smell a lot of those fermentation byproducts.

Refrigeration of dough also allows you to control when you want to use the dough. Most doughs will hold during refrigeration for about 48 hours and, in some cases, as long as 3 or 4 days, but you have to be sure that there is enough sugar in the dough to go out beyond 48 hours. The yeast continues to feed on the sugar all that time.

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Randy on June 02, 2005, 01:06:36 PM
A good point about the temperature I will see if he is still on list and maybe he could clarify the temperature.

Randy
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Randy on June 02, 2005, 01:11:04 PM
I sent him an email but he has not been active in the last several months.

Randy
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: xPHmgr on June 02, 2005, 11:49:10 PM
I did not measure the temperature of the water that I used to make the recipe.  However it was warm to hot but not so hot as to kill the yeast.  I have a Kitchen Aid mixer.  What I do is run my hot water until it is fairly warm/hot and then I rinse out the mixer bowl in order to raise the temperature of the bowl.  Then I measure out the correct amount of water and add it to the prewarmed bowl.  Sorry but I do not measure the temperature of the water but it is definitely very warm... just be careful not to make it too warm that you kill the yeast.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: xPHmgr on June 03, 2005, 08:15:28 AM
I went back and read the question asked regarding refrigerating the dough for so many hours before using it.

I do not know specifically why it was done that way at PH but I suspect it was mostly because of the way they ran their business.  They made their dough in the morning and then used it throughout the day... and so it allowed them to stop the rise process (or at least severely retard it) and make it usable for a longer period of time.

The other thing I noticed that it does is when it is used fresh (not refrigerated yet) the dough is very easily compressed by the handling and toppings.  After it has been refrigerated it seems to be less suspectable to loosing the air bubbles in the dough.

Hope that helps...
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Randy on June 07, 2005, 11:30:22 AM
On the recipe page should it read 90 -110 water temp XPHmgar?

Randy
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza - advice please
Post by: richdo on July 06, 2005, 07:32:45 PM
I could use some help here , please.

I tried the recipe, halved to make a 9x9" pizza.  My crust was mushy, and my toppings burned. 

Any ideas?

Like, should i put the dough in alone first ... and at that, coat it with something?  Does it matter how thick my pan is?  I used thin aluminum.  Does it need to be heavier? 

Thanks,
Rich
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Albright on August 21, 2005, 05:16:19 AM
Why the pizza edge have many small bubble?

And i see PizzaHut's pizza edge color is golden,not brown like pic.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Brandon on August 24, 2005, 11:23:56 AM
I made this recipie twice this past weekend.  Once it was pretty poor, but the second time it was perfect.  Here's what I did.

***how I altered the recipe***
The first time (not very good):
I followed the directions as closely as I could.  I used a 16 inch pan rather than a 14, but my crust was still 1.5 inches high.  The pizza baked and when it was done it had 1.5 inches of thick biscuity dough  for crust (biscuity pizza crust = very bad, and 1.5 inches of crust = way too much).

The second time (very good):
I used the dough to make 2 pizzas this time because I figured I had at least twice as much crust as I needed in my first attempt.  I let the dough rise and refrigerate in dough balls rather than in the oiled pan.  This pizza turned out a lot like the Pizza Hut Pan Pizza.  If I had to taste both with  my eyes closed, I probably could have told a difference, but honestly, they were very very close. 

Both times, it didn't take near the 1/2 cup of oil the recipie states to cover the bottom of my 16 inch pan.  In fact I'd bet 1/4 cup would be more than enough.  I still got a consistently golden and crispy fried crust bottom.

***stupid mistakes I made/fixed***
On the first pizza, I poured my flour into a big measuring cup an tapped the cup on the counter to level out the dough.  This was probably a huge novice mistake as I bet I ended up getting way more flour than I needed, which probably resulted in the biscuity dough.  On the second pizza, I shook the flour out of the bag lightly and leveled it off by pushing it around with a spoon, rather than tapping it and packing it all down.  The second dough ball, while not wet or sticky at all, was definately not as dry as the first was.

***Things I noticed***
I still don't see how you could possibly want all that dough on one pizza.  I love Pizza Hut Pan Pizza and I've had plenty of them, but I've never seen one with 1.5 inch thick crust.  I don't mean puffy crust around the edge, I mean 1.5 inches under every square inch of sauce and cheese.

In the second effort, I halved the dough and made 2 pizzas.  The first one in a pan with oil, and the second on a screen.  The oiled one had a brown crispy bottom to its crust, while the other had a more uniform crust.  Both were good thick crusts, so the oil is only neccessary if you want that fried brown bottom crustiness.

The first pizza sat in the oiled pan overnight, the second pizza was formed and put into an oiled pan just before baking, and both came out with a good bottom crust.   Thus.. the time the dough is in the oil doesn't seem to have any significant effect on the final outcome.

By not having the dough rise in the pan, you have an opportunity to allow for a ridge of crust when you flatten out your dough ball.  When it rises in the pan, it rised uniformly across its area and you have a flat, boring crust.  Imagine something like a 16inch pancake where the center is even a little bit higher than the edges (due to rising).  Then you top that and call it a pizza?  It looks very funny without any hint of edge crust.  I guess you do the "in-pan" rise to not compress the dough when shaping the ball into the pan, but I didn't notice any detrimental compression in my second doughs.  If I were to do a pan rise, and forfeit a well defined crust rim, I'd certainly still split the recipie to make 2 crusts instead of just one.

***In Conclusion***
I'll definately make this recipe again.  I'll be gentle with my flour, I should probably even sift it I guess.  And I'll surely make 2 dough balls for 2 crusts rather than just one.  I may or may not do the oiled pan thing, depending on my mood.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Lydia on August 31, 2005, 04:56:03 PM
This recipe turned out pretty darn good.

I doubled the recipe and used LaRomanella High-gluten flour. Cant get pendelton-fisher brand anymore  :'(.

But what really threw me off was the " Bake at 500F ON A PIZZA STONE" for 14 minutes.

I did this, with dough in pan, against my better judgment. My bottom crust didn't brown properly.

Should the directions have said to bake, then slide dough out onto stone???
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Spud on September 18, 2005, 12:06:06 AM
I've tried this recipe with mixed results many times over the last few weeks. The main problem is like the above post, it comes out more like a 2" loaf of bread (way too much) I remember at PH (I was a driver) when I made the personal pan for my employee meal we pressed the dough down with this plastic disk before sausing and topping. I can't remember if the cooks flattened the larger sizes in the middle. Are we suppose too?
Another problem I'm having almost every time is the dough being done on top but gummy in the center just below the sauce. The bottom of the crust is usually just short of being cooked to the right amount. I've started with the 500 degrees on the stone, then 450, then 425, this last time I tried it at 450 again but without the stone. (also this is in a cast iron skillet) but the same results. 

So in short... do we mash down the center after it comes out of the fridge in the pan.
and
why is the center gummy and the top done?

Thanks 
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Brandon on September 23, 2005, 01:59:17 PM
@spud

I don't know if it makes  a lot of difference, but I'm always heating up my sauce before it goes on the pizza.  I start with just plain tomato sauce and add basil, garlic, thyme, salt and pepper, oregano.  Anyway, the sauce is hot when it goes on the dough.  So when the pie goes into the oven, it doesn't have a layer of room temperature sauce soaking up all the top-down heat before it gets to the top of the dough.  So I bet heat gets to the dough through the sauce quicker since the sauce is alreay hot. 

As far as the 2 inches of crust goes.. yup, that's nasty isn't it.  I just split the dough ball and make 2 crusts.  If you make two 12-in pans, they'll still both have a good thick crust
Title: Really messed up
Post by: lox450 on December 14, 2006, 08:46:45 AM
I tried this recipe last night for the dough....I will go thru the process of what I did.

1. used warm to hot water and kneeded for 10 minutes with my hands...(I do not own a mixer)

2. I put the dough in an oiled pan and covered with cling wrap.  I let it rest for 4 hours. 

I got back to the pan and to be honest...it didn't rise too much.  Now granted..my house is rather cold this time of year due to being in Wisconsin.  But I didn't think it would have THAT big of an effect on the rise.   I just tried to punch it out as best I could and it barely touches the sides of the pan.  I will try to cook it tonight.   Do any of you know what part I messed up the worst?? 
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: giotto on December 14, 2006, 12:43:30 PM
When I first started to make the Pizza Hut style deep dish pizza, I found that the restaurants used a proofer that was set to around 100F. So after the dough sits in a pan overnight, it is placed in the proofer for about an hour. I have tried it with and without a top during this proof stage, and it has not seemed to make much of a difference. The dough is then pushed down and placed in the oven at about 455F.

So I follow this procedure and put it in the oven for an hour at 100F first, using a formula similar to what is posted on the first page here. I then run my oven between 455F and 475F, due to inefficiencies for maybe 12 minutes.  I've used KA all-purpose flour, bread flour, and a mix of the two. It all comes out great. The only time it failed is when I used Harvest King, which supersedes the gold medal best of bread (company recommends it for puff pastries and soft rolls on its site). Unlike KA, it produces a dense structure that I just do not care for with this pizza.

With KA flour, the deep dish crust has a golden hue color, and is almost transparent when you bite down into it, with a slightly crispy outer edge. There is no difference between it and Pizza Hut deep dish. Here's an example:

Bottom: http://home.comcast.net/~keck-foundation1/phut.JPG

 ::)
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: sonicdrink on December 16, 2006, 09:15:49 PM
When I first started to make the Pizza Hut style deep dish pizza, I found that the restaurants used a proofer that was set to around 100F. So after the dough sits in a pan overnight, it is placed in the proofer for about an hour. I have tried it with and without a top during this proof stage, and it has not seemed to make much of a difference. The dough is then pushed down and placed in the oven at about 455F.

So I follow this procedure and put it in the oven for an hour at 100F first, using a formula similar to what is posted on the first page here. I then run my oven between 455F and 475F, due to inefficiencies for maybe 12 minutes.  I've used KA all-purpose flour, bread flour, and a mix of the two. It all comes out great. The only time it failed is when I used Harvest King, which supersedes the gold medal best of bread (company recommends it for puff pastries and soft rolls on its site). Unlike KA, it produces a dense structure that I just do not care for with this pizza.

With KA flour, the deep dish crust has a golden hue color, and is almost transparent when you bite down into it, with a slightly crispy outer edge. There is no difference between it and Pizza Hut deep dish. Here's an example:

Bottom: http://home.comcast.net/~keck-foundation1/phut.JPG

 ::)

Holy smokes the bottom of your crust looks great.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: giotto on December 16, 2006, 11:10:13 PM
Hey, thanks Sonicdrink.

Welcome aboard.

Here's a link to the same dough made into a thinner version. The formula and picture is provided, along with an embedded link that provides tips for pizza crust color. For deep dish, I preferred King Arthur flour. I put it in a 10" x 2" pan and heated according to the quote you included.

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4284.msg36146.html#msg36146
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: DNA Dan on February 22, 2007, 11:29:25 PM
Here is a version of "pizza hut origial pan pizza" that I came across. Don't ask how I got it or else I'd have to kill ya >:D  I don't know if this is anything close to what you pizza hutters are making or using, so I can't vouch for it's authenticity. I haven't tried it.

Pizza Hut Original Pan Pizza                       


                   1 1/3 cups  Warm water (105F)
                      1/4 cup  Non-fat dry milk
                     1/2 teas. Salt
                       4 cups  Flour
                      1 Tbls.  Sugar
                        1 pk.  Dry yeast
                      2 Tbls.  Vegetable oil (for dough)
                        9 Oz.  Vegetable oil (3 oz. per pan)
                               Butter flavored Pam

   Put yeast, sugar, salt, and dry milk in a large (2 qt.) bowl. Add
   water and stir to mix well. Allow to sit for two minutes. Add oil
   and stir again. Add flour and stir until dough forms and flour is
   absorbed. Turn out on to a flat surface and knead for about 10 minutes.

   Divide dough into three balls. In three 9" cake pans, put 3 Oz. of
   oil in each making sure it is spread evenly. Using a rolling pin,
   roll out each dough ball to about a 9" circle. Place in cake pans.
   Spray the outter edge of dough with Pam. Cover with a plate. Place
   in warm area and allow to rise for 1 to 1 1/2 hours.

            Sauce:
                1 8 Ounce Can Tomato Sauce
                1 Teaspoon Dry Oregano
              1/2 Teaspoon Marjoram
              1/2 Teaspoon Dry Basil
              1/2 Teaspoon Garlic salt

   Combine and let sit for 1 hour.

      For Each Nine Inch Pizza:

      1. Preheat oven to 475F
      2. Spoon 1/3 cup sauce on dough and spread to within 1" of edge.
      3. Distribute 1 1/2 Oz. shredded mozzarella cheese on sauce.
      4. Place toppings of your choice in this order:
         Pepperoni or Ham
         Vegetables
         Meats (cooked ground sausage or beef)
      5. Top with 3 Oz. mozzarella cheese
      6. Cook until cheese is bubbling and outer crust is brown.
      7. Cut in six slices.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on February 23, 2007, 07:21:12 AM
Dan,

I thought what you posted looked familiar, and a Google search confirmed it: http://www.cdkitchen.com/recipes/recs/525/Pizza_Hut_Original_Pan_Pizza41605.shtml.

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Randy on February 23, 2007, 07:42:45 AM
And it looks like it is a slightly modified version of of the recipe XPH Mgr posted as post number one on this very same thread a few years ago and is included on the main page recipes of this site.  Looks like your find is actually a copy from this site.

It is always a good idea to try a recipe before posting so that you can give a good review
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: DNA Dan on February 23, 2007, 01:24:43 PM
 >:( Dammit, I hate being busted by the forum police.  :-D  Thanks for keeping this place in check guys. I thought I stumbled upon the mother load OUTSIDE of this site, but I will check here next time first. Consider it a moment of spontaneous lack of judgement.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: November on February 23, 2007, 02:00:54 PM
In an almost completely unrelated side-note, CDKitchen sometimes has some very looney recipes trying to imitate the real thing.  For instance:

http://www.cdkitchen.com/recipes/recs/59/Mocha_Frappuccino60809.shtml
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Randy on February 23, 2007, 03:54:17 PM
DNA Dan no harm no foul.  Keep posting
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Bryan S on February 24, 2007, 08:14:31 PM
Dan,

I thought what you posted looked familiar, and a Google search confirmed it: http://www.cdkitchen.com/recipes/recs/525/Pizza_Hut_Original_Pan_Pizza41605.shtml.

Peter
And here  ;Dhttp://www.recipegoldmine.com/ccpPE/p34.html (http://www.recipegoldmine.com/ccpPE/p34.html)
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: elpresidente408 on April 18, 2007, 02:05:16 PM
Having worked at a Pizza Hut express for 2 years, I can say that the recipe from the last post is probably the most accurate. We would get the frozen dough cakes, squirt about 3oz of vegetable oil on the bottom of the pan, place the dough inside, spray the edges with food release (soybean oil), and let proof. After it rises about an inch or two, you stamp it down creating a depression in the center. Fill it up with the toppings and bake for 7 minutes in their convection ovens. This was for those personal 6" pies. We also got the dough pre-made.

I am still convinced that their dough was not made from anything natural lol. It would often smell like nail polish remover and would rise no matter where. Sometimes if we were short on proofed breadstick dough, we would proof it on top of the oven. Worked like a charm in 1/4 of the time it's supposed to take.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Peterubers on June 17, 2007, 07:24:18 PM
I made the recipe from the very first post of this thread -- only difference is that I split all the ingredients exactly down the middle to accomodate my 10" skillet, and I did not have dry milk so I excluded that.  I followed the directions exactly and only had time for 3 hours in the fridge.

The results were phenomenal -- tastes JUST LIKE PIZZA HUT.  I am a believer in this recipe.  I did 500 deg in a gas oven with pizza stone preheated for 45 minutes, then the seasoned skillet was placed directly on the stone for exactly 15 minutes. 

I put my italian sausage on uncooked and made the pieces very thin so it would cook within the span of 15 minutes, and it worked fine (the thickest piece was no more than 1/4 inch).

I used Harvest King unbleached white flour (Gold Medal), Fleichman's yeast, 6n1 doctored up with EVO and seasonings for my sauce and saputo's whole milk mozzo.

Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Adam T on April 11, 2008, 08:08:41 AM
I made up the dough using this recipe in the evening two days ago and baked it last night. This is the first time I attempted making a pan pizza.  I used King Arthur Bread Flour, 100 degree water, low fat dry milk, and 1 packet instant yeast for the recipe. I mixed/kneaded the dough in my Kitchenaid mixer with the dough hook on speed 2 for 10 minutes. In my short career of making pizzas at home I've never had a dough turn out this nice!

I used half the dough in a 9 x 13 no stick lasagna pan, I dressed the pizza right to the edge of the pan. I baked it for 12 minutes in my gas oven with the pan sitting on a baking stone that was pre-heated for 30min.

This made a fantastic pizza! Just what I wanted. I was hoping to start with this recipe and then try and recreate the pan style pizza sold at a local pizza place. (Jets Pizza http://jetspizza.net/ (http://jetspizza.net/)) You can see a picture on their home page of what I was trying to achieve. I think the cheese right on the edge melts and forms a crispy browned rim around the top edge of the pizza. Anyway this recipe just nailed it the first try, 100 times better than I expected it would turn out.

I baked the other half of the dough in a slightly smaller rectangle bright silver pan my wife uses for making cakes. Between baking it second and the different pan it didn't turn out as nice. The pizza stuck to the sides of the pan, the bottom didn't brown up as nice and it absorbed more oil I think.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Bread Maker on April 26, 2008, 08:07:57 PM
Hey there. It's my first post.  :)

I think I am going to try this recipe, but replace the powdered milk with corn meal. I found another "copycat" recipe on another site, and it called for that.  I don't think I have the milk, so I might give it a try. Anyway, I love the forum. Glad I can be here.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Bread Maker on April 26, 2008, 10:36:57 PM
I did it with the corn meal and it was alright. It was just WAY TOO thick. It was like 2 inches thick. I'm still a novice, I guess. I guess it also doesn't help to not have a pizza stone. I went to Menards and another small hardware store and I can't find those quarry stones.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on April 26, 2008, 10:50:54 PM
Bread Maker,

See http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4607.msg38909.html#msg38909 (Reply 6) and http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6040.0.html.

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Bread Maker on April 26, 2008, 11:47:07 PM
Bread Maker,



Peter

Thanks. I noticed from some of the responses that the bottom was also an issue for a couple. That, in fact, was an issue for me as well. I didn't use nearly enough oil (just enough to coat the bottom) and it was a bit tough getting it out. It was also sticking to the sides. All in all, the dough was actually somewhat tasty, a little. And....I skimped and cut corners, so it wasn't a total failure. Pretty much my first attempt at this style of pie.


By the way, it looks like you put in lots of effort to this forum. Thanks for that!

God Bless.
BM
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Jad on May 23, 2008, 07:44:48 PM
Hi all!

I tried this recipe as my very first attempt at cooking my own pizza and it turned out great. Well it was extremely high (2-2.5") but it still tasted yummy as. We don't have deep pan that deep in down under, well not from Pizza Hut anyways. My 2nd attempt I simply made two pizzas from the exact same recipe like I noticed some others in this forum have done as well. It turned out perfect!

Anyway I was just curious, what kind of sugar are you all using? I've been using caster sugar but wondering is there a better I should be using. I'm a big fan of raw sugar in general but I'm not sure if that would work with this recipe. Any help is good help.

Also here in AUS the Pizza Hut deep pan has a crispness on the top of the pizza at the edges and side of the surface (the crust). The bottom of my pizzas are perfect but at the top of the crust and even the side of the pizza could be a little crisper. Would painting some more vegetable oil on these parts with a cooking brush just before placing the pizza in the oven do the trick? I can feel my arteries blocking up already but hey, if it tastes good right?  :chef:
Title: Re:Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: autodesigner on May 23, 2008, 11:43:27 PM

Nice....looks like the real deal!
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on May 24, 2008, 10:02:41 AM
Jad,

Is the photo of the large pizza or one of the smaller ones? Also, what size pan have you been using?

As far as sugar is concerned, most members (and I would say most Americans) tend to use ordinary table sugar (sucrose) in their pizza doughs, such as the one you made. It is possible to use caster sugar, which is similar to our "superfine" sugar, but since its grain size is smaller than table sugar, you may not need as much (by volume) as the recipe calls for. It is also possible to substitute raw sugar for table sugar in the recipe you used. On my mini scale, a level teaspoon of raw sugar weighs about the same as a level teaspoon of table sugar, so you should be able to swap one out for the other. However, you may want to dissolve the raw sugar in the formula water to be sure that is distributed uniformly throughout the dough.

To get more crust color at the sides and top edges, you might try oiling the sides of the pan and also the exposed top rim of the dough. If you are not using a dark anodized pan or a seasoned pan darkened by long term use, using such a pan might also help. You can also try baking the pizza at a lower temperature for a longer period of time. That combination may help dry the crust out a bit and make it more crispy. Moving the pizza to a higher oven position toward the end of the bake to get more top heat and a darker, crispier rim is another possibility.

Peter

Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Jad on May 24, 2008, 10:39:55 AM
Hi Peter,
 
The photo is a large pizza. Perhaps my YouTube video might give you a better perspective. :) ...

youtube.com/watch?v=gkn-bzuONjY

I cooked it in a 17" non-stick deep pan. I don't have an oven at the moment that does 500 °F which is about 260 °C from memory, so I cooked it at 220 °C. I actually used caster sugar for both attempts so I am yet to try the table or raw sugar. I figured the taste difference between caster and table sugar would be minimal but the raw might create a noticeably different taste, for better or worse.

Thanks for all your advice its been great. I'll definitely add some oil to the top edges & sides and perhaps cook it even longer than I already do. I might set it to 200 °C and see how that goes.

Thanks again!
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on May 24, 2008, 10:55:27 AM
Jad,

Thanks for the link. For the convenience of others, the direct link is http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gkn-bzuONjY.

Did you use the 17" deep dish pan to make the smaller pizzas also? What size were the smaller pizzas? I think it should be possible to tailor the recipe you used to the pan(s) you are using. What kind of flour did you use to make the pizzas? All-purpose (or whatever you call it in Australia)?

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Bread Maker on May 24, 2008, 01:36:53 PM
I can feel my arteries blocking up already but hey, if it tastes good right?  :chef:

Dang right.  :) Hope you post back again.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Bryan S on May 24, 2008, 04:22:09 PM
Hi Peter,
 
The photo is a large pizza. Perhaps my YouTube video might give you a better perspective. :) ...

youtube.com/watch?v=gkn-bzuONjY

I cooked it in a 17" non-stick deep pan. I don't have an oven at the moment that does 500 °F which is about 260 °C from memory, so I cooked it at 220 °C. I actually used caster sugar for both attempts so I am yet to try the table or raw sugar. I figured the taste difference between caster and table sugar would be minimal but the raw might create a noticeably different taste, for better or worse.

Thanks for all your advice its been great. I'll definitely add some oil to the top edges & sides and perhaps cook it even longer than I already do. I might set it to 200 °C and see how that goes.

Thanks again!
Jad, I have found that 425 works the best for pan pizza on the middle rack. I cook it for 22-25 min. I give the pan a 180 spin after about 10-12 min. HTH
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Jad on May 24, 2008, 06:43:31 PM
Dang right.  :) Hope you post back again.

Haha fair call.

So far I'm ok.

 :-D


Jad, I have found that 425 works the best for pan pizza on the middle rack. I cook it for 22-25 min. I give the pan a 180 spin after about 10-12 min. HTH

Actually that's funny cos' I spin the pan around 180 anyway. Not because of a cooking technique but because my oven is broken atm and I'm using a little electronic pizza oven that doesn't quite fit the 17" deep pan tray. One side is always sticking out and not getting cooked properly so I kinda gotta do it. Tastes so good though.

If you can recommend a good tomato based sauce for a pepperoni styled pizza I'd love to hear it. One of the best pizzas I had was actually at the Vatican in Rome! The base source was to die for (heaven forbid) >:D :chef:
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Jad on May 26, 2008, 05:07:55 PM
The raw sugar idea didn't work. :'(

The dough seemed fine in texture and all that but even after being shrink wrapped in a tray for a couple of hours at room temperature it didn't rise one iota. I stuck it in the fridge overnight just to see how it would go. I had a look in the morning (just now) and it's unchanged. I'm 99% sure I did everything identical except the raw sugar idea instead of caster sugar. I used much warmer water this time, to help mix the raw sugar through properly. Perhaps it was too hot? I don't know.

Oh well, back to caster sugar I guess.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on May 26, 2008, 05:43:00 PM
Jad,

I believe you may have missed my Reply 103 earlier in this thread.

As for the raw sugar, I don't see any reason why the dough didn't work using that form of sugar. If the dough didn't rise at all, that suggests that the water temperature may have been too high--possibly so high that it severely damaged the yeast. ADY is supposed to be rehydrated in water at around 105 degrees F for about ten minutes. Anything materially above or below that temperature--by even five or ten degrees--for a 10-minute rehydration period will degrade the performance of the yeast. ADY, like other forms of yeast, will die when the rehydration temperature is around 143 degrees F. What happens to the ADY between say, 120 degrees F and 143 degrees F, will depend on the actual temperature of the water and how long the ADY is in the water. If you didn't use a thermometer to measure the water temperature, next time you may want to do so. Of all the problems that users have with ADY, according to the yeast producers the most common is incorrect water temperature.

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Jad on May 27, 2008, 11:46:05 PM
Ah thanks Peter, it must have been the hot water then. :-[

I read your post (103) and yes I used the same pan/s. This was my 3rd attempt. My first attempt was the really tall pizza which tasted great but was twice a thick as any pizza here in AUS, as far as dough goes. In the 2nd attempt I was using exactly the same tools and ingredients except this time I split the dough in two once it was fully kneaded and rolled them out (12") for 2 17" pizza trays instead of just the one. This was my best batch so far, as height and taste were very very close to Pizza Hut Deep Pan downunder style. The 3rd attempt was again two pizzas, same tools and ingredients, only raw sugar this time and hotter water in the mix. It is this 3rd attempt that has failed.

So what I've down now is made my 4th batch for two 17" pizzas with raw sugar instead of caster sugar and I used the same water temperature as I did with the first two batches which were successful. So basically the only difference in this 4th batch is the different type of sugar. The dough is in the air tight trays now and it looks like they are rising to the occasion thank goodness! :chef:

I'll let you know in about 6 hours how it all went. ;D
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Jad on May 28, 2008, 06:27:34 AM
Success!!

I might be biased but I think the raw sugar is the way to go. I could taste a distinct difference for the better.

Thanks again Peter, and others, for all your help with this. I am very grateful, and so it my stomach. ;D

Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on May 28, 2008, 09:04:07 AM
Jad,

It looks like you are well on your way. Congratulation. Your results look very good.

Did you change anything else in making your pizza, like using a different oven temperature or oven position? Since you rolled out the dough to 12" and used your 17" pan, I assume that there was no point in oiling the sides of your pan to get more crust color or crispiness.

It's entirely up to you, but if you want to get closer from a dough weight standpoint to the real thing, you might consider trying the dough formulation at Reply 6 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4607.msg38909.html#msg38909. That formulation will give you 22 ounces of dough (that is rolled out to 12"), whereas the recipe you used gives you around 18.5 ounces of dough. Unfortunately, you will need to use a scale to weigh out the flour and water in the abovereferenced modified dough formulation. For the rest of the ingredients, you can use the volume measurements, however they would be converted to the Australian system of measurements.

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Bread Maker on May 28, 2008, 02:09:02 PM
Success!!

I might be biased but I think the raw sugar is the way to go. I could taste a distinct difference for the better.

Thanks again Peter, and others, for all your help with this. I am very grateful, and so it my stomach. ;D



Nice!
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: markkubis on July 13, 2008, 08:01:14 PM
I've made the Pan Pizza using the ingredients listed by xPHmgr at the start of this thread.

I halved the quantity of all ingredients as listed and made a 12" pizza. I omitted the powdered milk. I used 15% protein flour, the flour I also use to make NY style pizza. The dough weighed 18.5 Oz. I used 1/4 cup of oil in the pan.

Rolled out the dough was 1/4" thick at 10" diameter. After resting in the fridge overnight and baking the following morning the resulting crust was 1/2" thick at 12" diameter, the ideal thickness for a pan pizza in my opinion.

I cooked it at Gas mark 8 (450F) for 30 minutes on a pre-heated baking stone of 1" thickness on the middle shelf of my gas oven.

It was truly excellent and definitely better than a PH crust. The 1/4 cup of oil in the pan was the perfect amount for a 12" tray.

Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: abacaba on October 05, 2008, 12:52:42 AM
Is it possible for someone to help me change this into a bread machine recipe?  Thanks.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on October 05, 2008, 10:21:08 AM
Is it possible for someone to help me change this into a bread machine recipe?  Thanks.

abacaba,

Bread machines vary, but if your model can handle 4 1/2 cups of flour and about 37 ounces total dough, I don't see any reason why you shouldn't be able to use the basic dough cycle of your machine to make the dough. In my machine, the sequencing of ingredients for the PH clone recipe you are considering would be water, flour (bread flour), sugar, dry milk, salt, oil, and yeast (ADY). If I were to use my bread machine, I would monitor the dough knead time and pull the dough once it comes together into a smooth, cohesive ball. Hopefully that would be at around 10 minutes as the recipe calls for. I don't think I would let the dough go out to the total knead time programmed into the machine (for my machine, a Zojirushi, the total knead time is closer to 14 minutes). Some machines allow for programming knead times so that is an option if your machine can be so programmed.

In my case, I might also be inclined to use cold water so that the kneading doesn't overheat the dough.

If you decide to proceed, I hope you will let us know how things turn out. There are many members with bread machines who may be interested in your results, as well as any suggestions that you might have for improvement.

BTW, if your particular bread machine can't handle around 37 ounces of dough, it is a fairly simple matter to convert the recipe to produce a smaller amount of dough--essentially any amount you want to make. I can help you with this if you need assistance.

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: abacaba on October 05, 2008, 05:38:00 PM
Thanks, Pete-zza, I have a Black and Decker bread machine which uses a 2 hour cycle time.  It includes the rising process.  Do you mean I should pull it out after 10 minutes of kneading?  Also, I believe it can handle 37 ounces of dough...but I was planning on making it 44 to make 2 doughs.  Also, should I add in the oil as it is kneading like what the recipe says or not?

I plan on making the pizza on friday or saturday but I might change my plans.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on October 05, 2008, 05:46:32 PM
abacaba,

If you plan to follow the instructions as given, I would remove the dough after about 10 minutes, although in your case it may be a bit longer if you decide to make 44 ounces of dough instead of around 37 ounces.

As for the oil, I would add it as part of the normal sequencing of ingredients for your particular bread machine. I would not add the oil after the kneading begins.

Peter

Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: abacaba on October 06, 2008, 01:30:48 AM
mmm...thanks.  I forgot to ask if bread machine yeast will make a difference from the regular yeast?  I only have bread machine yeast at home.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on October 06, 2008, 09:58:20 AM
mmm...thanks.  I forgot to ask if bread machine yeast will make a difference from the regular yeast?  I only have bread machine yeast at home.

abacaba,

The instructions for some machines, like mine, recommend that ADY be used for the basic dough setting and that a "rapid rise" yeast be used for the "quick" dough setting. I have no idea as to which is better for the dough you plan to make. You can try the bread machine yeast since you already have it and see how you like the results. Fortunately, ADY can be found in just about every supermarket. You perhaps should check the instructions that came with your machine to see what the manufacturer of that machine recommends.

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: abacaba on October 12, 2008, 05:46:55 PM
well...I used the bread machine...it didn't really turn out to have the quality of pizza hut pizza  (It was really dry and hard)

but, I think that is due to other reasons.

I used 1/5 cup of oil, an aluminum foil pan (I don't have a deep dish pan), and baked it for 30 mins.

I think those were the reasons for the failure...not the bread machine.

I stopped the kneading at 11:30 mins and the dough turned out fine so probably the bread machine is ok for this dough.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on October 12, 2008, 08:05:31 PM
abacaba,

I'm sure it was the use of the aluminum foil pan that was responsible for the results you achieved. Aluminum, and especially shiny aluminum, will reflect heat rather than absorb it. So, it will be difficult to get good browning and if you try to compensate by using a longer bake time the moisture will be driven out of the dough and the resultant crust will be dry and hard.

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: TronCarter on October 14, 2008, 07:29:50 AM
For a very good Pizza Hut pan style pizza, you should try the recipe shown here:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5656.0.html

It is meant to duplicate a Tommy's Pizza (Pizza L'Oven) sicilian style pizza, which I have never tried, but I think it does come close to a PH pan style.  I agree with Peter that your selection of pan was the problem.  I use a darker pan and a pizza stone and only cook them for 8 minutes (at 550F).  I also include the ingredient amounts for an 8x8 pan towards the end of the thread if you would like to make a small pizza for your first try.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: JConk007 on January 07, 2009, 08:57:04 PM
Oops I put my pie in the wrong place never saw this thread sorry for the re post I really liked the flavor very similar to P-Hut pan taste I remember. 
Don't have to buy again unless I am stuck overnight at an airport!  :D
very tight crumb.  I think I had a bit too much dough in the pan I made the  as per recipe Forum  poster Xphmgr and used the percentages and calculator tool to come up with  quantities for 2 - 9" pizzas as
 I took a healthy chunk out of I of them because it rose above the 1 1/2 Pan!
It was a 24 hr refriderator rise followed by 2 hrs room temp.
here they are pre bake.

Peter if you want to remove  my other post from I think thick style? go for it. These are Pizza Hut Pan recipe pizzas
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: JConk007 on January 07, 2009, 09:02:19 PM
I made a sauce with 6 in 1 as the base, and shredded block sorrento mozzarella Nice crust fluffy  and cooked Nicely all the Way Through, almost cake like, a crisp  bottom from the oil, and great flavor without being soggy or drenched in oil!
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: TronCarter on January 08, 2009, 07:59:38 AM
JConk007, It looks like you are on the right track, but agree that there is too much dough.  A 9-inch round pan is essentially the same area as the 8-inch square pans that I use.  I use ~8.6 oz of dough per pan and it comes out just about right (for me).  You might want to try to shoot for something around that weight for each dough ball.   

Good luck.

Tron
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: haybot on January 30, 2009, 09:11:11 AM
Just a short question, the recipe states that the pizza should be baked on a pizza stone. But still in the pan right ? If i don't have a pizza stone, should i pre bake the dough before adding sauce and cheese to  make shure that the crust ist right before the cheese is all black?
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: TronCarter on January 30, 2009, 09:32:36 AM
Yes, in the pan on the stone.  The stone will provide a thermal mass and store up heat and then release it into the pan and pizza for a long time, otherwise the bottom will not get done.

Pre-baking is a good thought, but I don't know about the heating, cooling, heating when you are basically frying the dough in the pan oil.  I think I would cook for a longer time, but cover the top with foil for part of the cooking time, that way the top won't burn while you are waiting for the bottom to brown.  For me, with a stone it takes 10 minutes, so without a stone I would maybe go 10 minutes on the bottom rack, and then cover with foil and go another 10.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Randy on February 18, 2009, 01:58:23 PM
I'm not sure why, but for some reason I never got around to trying this recipe.  Could have been the amount of oil used but still, once would not hurt.  I have  it in the cooler now for tonight.  Once I remove the pan with risen dough what do I do next?  That is do I press it down in the center as one post suggested?

Randy
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: TronCarter on February 18, 2009, 03:01:59 PM
Once you take it out of the cooler, if it is not fully pressed out, do it right away, and then leave it alone.

I would remove it from the cooler at least 3 hours before you plan to use it.  Let it warm up to at least room temperature.  My house is cool and dry in the winter, so I usually let it rise in the oven with the heat off, but oven light on.  That will give it an extra 10 degrees or so.  I also cover the pan with foil to keep the top from drying out.  This will allow the dough to proof up nicely and then you are ready to add toppings.  Don't get too rough with it at this point because any unnecessary poking and prodding will flatten the dough out.

Although a slightly different recipe, I talk about letting the dough rise in the pan, etc here:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5656.msg62496.html#msg62496

and some pictures of the process and end result here:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5656.msg62551.html#msg62551
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Randy on February 18, 2009, 03:23:41 PM
Sounds good, I will give that a try.

Randy
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Randy on February 19, 2009, 06:15:29 AM
It was one of those nights.  As I put the topping on the pizza, the glass door on the oven looked like an outside window during a lightning storm.  The electric element burned through. 

Fortunately, we have a counter top convection oven that geld the 10" cake pan I was using.  The pizza came out well for a toaster oven.

This recipe is surprisingly good and is as noted in so many other post a perfect match for the Pizza Hut version from the old days.

Randy
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: nosauce on March 19, 2009, 08:36:46 PM
Can anyone tell me what kind of pan is best for baking pan pizza?  Can you make the pan pizza on the pizza peel and then slide it onto the pizza stone?  If using a cast iron skillet to bake the pizza in do you put it on the pizza stone or just in the oven on the lower rack?  Will a stainless steel pan cook the pizza as well (I am trying to stay away from aluminum as I just found out the aluminum in my body is off the chart)?  I appreciate any help anyone can give me.  Thanks!
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: TronCarter on March 20, 2009, 07:15:23 AM
When it comes to pizza pans, darker is better.  If you are using a pan, you really don't need a peel, you can just use your hand to put the pan on the stone.  Although I have never tried a cast iron skillet, I am sure you would want to put it on the stone.  There is a large thermal mass to the cast iron and you want to get heat into it as quickly as possible, otherwise the bottom will never get done in time.  Stainless pans are usually bright and shiny.  This will reflect heat instead of absorb it, so the bottom will never get done. 

Tron
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Boston BBQ-za on September 05, 2009, 09:49:21 AM
Although my wife enjoys a lot of my newly created pies, she does enjoy pizza hut so I tired this last night, since I just got in my new PSTK pan from pizzatools.com. I'll give my run down of what I did and my thoughts for you all. 
Ingredients wise, I followed the original recipe exactly and I found the dough came together very nicely in the mixer, especially with the addition of the 2T of oil.  I only used around 3 T of veg oil on the bottom of my pan due to the previous responses about potentially too much oil.  Also, since the bottom diameter of my pan is 15.25", I also figured that I could use all the dough.  After rolling it out, I plated into my pan, covered and put directly in the refrigerator. (This is where I deviated from the recipe.. not letting rise to 1.5'' before putting in the fridge) The dough initally was fairly thin and only rolled out to approx 2 inches from the end of the pan.  This was all on Sep. 3. On Sep 4, I stretched the dough to the edges mid morning and put back in the fridge. 
At around 4:00, I took the pan out of the fridge and left on the countertop.  Oven was turned on at 5:50 and the pie was put in at 6:30 at 450deg, 2nd to bottom rack on 4 x 8'' unglazed quarry tiles.  The pie cooked for exactly 15 min. 
For my sauce, I used the 6-1 tomatoes with 1tsp basil, oregano, garlic salt and 1/2-3/4 tsp marjoram.  I blanched my boars head pepperoni for 4 min in boiling water prior to cutting and putting on the pizza and I used the 4 cheese mixture from trader joes.

I didn't tell my wife that I was making a Pizza hut clone and while eating it, I asked her whether it tasted similar to any type of pizza.  She said it reminded her of Pizza hut. 

All things considered, I liked this recipe and it is very easy to do/replicate if this is the style pizza you're trying to do.  I found the dough just slightly dry and wonder whether I would add a little more oil to the pan next time or slightly increase the amount of water in the dough.  This pan seems to be just the right size for this amount of dough.  The pie was a little over an inch thick at the crust but not too thick throughout. The timing in the oven was perfect and the crust was nicely browned on the top crust and underside.  I think next time I would blanch the pepperoni a little longer because as you can see, I still had some decent grease pools on top of the pizza.   Also, I thought the 6-1 tomatoes would replicate pizza hut more than san marzano, but my wife and I both agree that we like the san marzano taste better.  also, if I had to do it over again, I may go a little lighter on the cheese.
Note, the last picture is after degreasing with a paper towl.

Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: dicepackage on November 22, 2009, 08:32:04 PM
Does anyone know the thickness factor for this dough?  I would love to be able to accurately scale this to other sizes.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on November 22, 2009, 09:14:20 PM
Does anyone know the thickness factor for this dough?  I would love to be able to accurately scale this to other sizes.

That's a tricky one. The weight of the ingredients for the basic recipe as given at http://www.pizzamaking.com/panpizza.php comes to 37.39 ounces. That is for a dough piece that is shaped to 12" and placed in a 14" pan. I think I would use the 14" size to calculate the thickness factor since that is the final size of the pizza.

Some members have found the basic recipe to produce more dough than they would like. Some time ago, based on information provided by a Pizza Hut manager on dough weights and pan sizes, I converted the basic PH clone recipe to conform to those numbers, at Reply 6 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4607.msg38909.html#msg38909. See also http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,6040.0.html. I didn't calculate a thickness factor for the modified version of the PH clone recipe but I think I would use the final pan size to calculate it, rather than the smaller dough piece that is smaller than the pan size.

If the basic PH recipe is used, in scaling to a different size I think I would try to keep the dough skin thickness to 3/4", which is the thickness recited in the basic PH recipe.

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: dicepackage on November 23, 2009, 01:33:38 AM
Thanks for the help but I think it is best to stick with my current method of calculating the area to scale down.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Essen1 on November 23, 2009, 02:32:19 AM
Thanks for the help but I think it is best to stick with my current method of calculating the area to scale down.

Which is...?  ???
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: dicepackage on November 23, 2009, 10:45:31 PM
Basically I take the mathematical way of finding the area.

Find the area of the 14-inch
14/2 = 7
r^2 *pi
7^2 * 3.1415
49 * 3.1415
Area = 153.9335

Find the area of the other pan.  In my case a 9-inch
9/2 = 4.5
4.5^2 * 3.1415
20.25 * 3.1415
Area = 63.615375

Divide the area of the pan you want to cook with by the pan the recipe uses
63.615375 / 153.9335 = .413265306

Multiply each of the ingredients in the list by .41 and use that measurement.  Recipes scale differently so this isn't an entirely accurate method for reproduction but it is close enough for me most of the time.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on November 24, 2009, 10:27:32 AM
dicepackage,

Having gone through your mathematical analysis, I am sure you know this, but for the benefit of others, the math simplifies to the ratio of the squares of the radii: (4.5 x 4.5)/(7 x 7) = 0.41.

The advantage of using the expanded dough calculating tool (at http://www.pizzamaking.com/expanded_calculator.html) is that if you enter the thickness factor (see below), along with the baker's percents given at Reply 6 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4607.msg38909.html#msg38909 and the desired pizza size (9" in your case), the tool will do all of the number crunching and conversions from weights to volumes. Plus, you can use a bowl residue compensation if you'd like. For the original PH clone recipe, for a 14" pizza, the thickness factor is 37.39 oz./(3.14159 x 7 x 7) = 0.24289. For the 22 ounce version of the PH clone recipe, the thickness factor is 22 oz./(3.14159 x 7 x 7) = 0.14291.

Peter

Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Bread Maker on November 25, 2009, 10:08:42 AM
The television show America's Test Kitchen on PBS made a phenominal looking pan pizza on a recent episode.

I really want to try this:

http://sseichinger.blogspot.com/2008/08/make-pan-pizza.html
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pizzacrazy7 on December 16, 2009, 01:19:31 PM
I don't know if I'm crazy or just tired, but I can't find this recipe in bakers % anywhere in this post and I would assume someone (Pete-zza) would of put this recipe into bakers % by now.  I would like to try it out.  I bought a couple of seasoned 6" Pizza Hut type pans of the net and though I'd try em out for the kids.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Trogdor33 on December 16, 2009, 01:37:44 PM
I converted the weights from the recipe in the recipes section to bakers percentages:

Bread Flour   637.9   100.00%
Water   354.4   55.56%
ADY           7.7   1.21%
Pwd Milk   14.2   2.23%
Salt           5.7   0.89%
Sugar           11.9   1.87%
Veg Oil   28.4   4.45%
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pizzacrazy7 on December 16, 2009, 01:41:52 PM
Thanks Trogdor33!  Is there any way to convert the ADY to IDY?
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on December 16, 2009, 02:17:57 PM
Tony,

As previously discussed, some time ago, at Reply 6 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4607.msg38909.html#msg38909, I converted the basic PH clone pan dough recipe to baker's percent format but I scaled the recipe down to 22 ounces of dough for a 14" pan. Those two numbers came from a member who, at the time he posted, worked for Pizza Hut. I used the conversion data that is embedded in the dough calculating tools, which is perhaps why my numbers differ a bit from those that Joe (Trogdor33) came up with. When I did my original conversion, I calculated a total dough weight of 37.39 ounces. If you use that number in the expanded dough calculating tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/expanded_calculator.html, along with the aforementioned baker's percents, you should come up with numbers similar to what Joe posted. Or you can use the thickness factor I came up with in Reply 140 in this thread to come up with numbers for other pan sizes.

For ADY to IDY yeast conversion purposes, you might take a look at http://www.theartisan.net/convert_yeast_two.htm. That conversion will change the final dough weight and the dough formulation a bit but not by enough to worry about.

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Trogdor33 on December 16, 2009, 02:33:26 PM
Tony,

I was in the middle of submitting when I noticed Peter had already replied, but since I spent the time typing, I will still throw in my $0.02.

IDY = ADY * 3 / 4

ADY = IDY * 4 / 3

The table that Peter linked to is basically an enumeration of these formulas.

-Joe
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pizzacrazy7 on December 16, 2009, 04:13:04 PM
Guys,

Thanks.  I figured it had been done somewhere, I was just looking in the wrong place.  So as far as the ADY to IDY, could I use the figure of 1.18518%, and put into the expanded calculator or do I need to convert differently off the chart from theartisan.net?  Also, there are 2 different TF is Peter's post.  Which one would be the correct one?  It doesn't vary from size to size does it?  Thanks again for all the help.

Tony

 :pizza: 
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on December 16, 2009, 04:42:33 PM
Tony,

You can use the theartisan.net yeast conversion table but I usually use the conversion factors that Joe posted. The conversion table is most convenient when you are working with specific weights or volumes of yeast. For your purposes, in the expanded dough calculating tool I would use 3/4 x 1.18518% ADY = 0.88882% IDY.

You are correct that I gave two thickness factor numbers in Reply 140. The first one, 0.24289, applies if you want to scale the original PH clone pan dough recipe posted in the Recipe section of this forum (at http://www.pizzamaking.com/panpizza.php) to your particular pan size (6"). If you want to use the scaled down version that came out the input of the PH employee (at Reply 6 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4607.msg38909.html#msg38909) but scale it down even further for your 6" pan size, then you would use the second thickness factor, 0.14291. The two approaches will produce different amounts of dough.

If you want to take a first crack at coming up with the dough formulation for your 6" pan size, I can take a look at it if you'd like.

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pizzacrazy7 on December 18, 2009, 12:02:43 PM
Here's the formulation I came up for a 6" PH pan pizza.  Peter, if you could check it and see how I did?

Flour (100%):
Water (55.555%):
IDY (.88882%):
Salt (.875%):
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (4.27199%):
Sugar (1.875%):
Dry Non-Fat Milk (2.35155%):
Total (165.81736%):
69.08 g  |  2.44 oz | 0.15 lbs
38.38 g  |  1.35 oz | 0.08 lbs
0.61 g | 0.02 oz | 0 lbs | 0.2 tsp | 0.07 tbsp
0.6 g | 0.02 oz | 0 lbs | 0.11 tsp | 0.04 tbsp
2.95 g | 0.1 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.65 tsp | 0.22 tbsp
1.3 g | 0.05 oz | 0 lbs | 0.32 tsp | 0.11 tbsp
1.62 g | 0.06 oz | 0 lbs | 1.13 tsp | 0.38 tbsp
114.55 g | 4.04 oz | 0.25 lbs | TF = 0.14291

With Instructions:
In a stand mixer (KitchenAid) fitted with a dough hook, add the water, yeast and powdered milk.

Mix the remaining dry ingredients together in a separate container and add them to the mixer.

Mix on low (speed 2) until most of the flour and water have mixed, then continue kneading for 10 minutes. The dough will be loose and scrappy at first and will quickly form a moist, smooth cohesive ball (while the dough is still scrappy, add the vegetable oil).

While the dough is kneading, add about 2 tsp of vegetable oil to a 6" pan style pizza pan making sure that the oil completely covers the bottom.

After the dough has been kneaded for 10 minutes, remove it from the mixing bowl and, using a rolling pin, roll it out to approximately 1/2" thick and about 6" in diameter. If you have more dough than you need, save the remainder for another time.

Place the dough in the pan and cover tightly.

Let the dough rise until it has filled the entire pan and is about 3/4" thick.

Place the pan (still covered) into the refrigerator for at least 4 hours (up to 24 hours).

WHEN READY TO MAKE

Preheat oven to 500 °F for about 30-45 minutes.

Remove dough from the refrigerator and add sauce, cheese, and toppings.

Bake at 500 °F on a pizza stone for 14 minutes.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on December 18, 2009, 12:44:09 PM
Tony,

You done good. However, if you plan to make only one dough ball for your 6" pan, you will have difficulty trying to make a 4.04 ounce dough ball in your stand mixer, and the instructions that you set forth, especially the knead times, are unlikely to apply as they would to a much larger dough batch size. Likewise, as to the bake time. I doubt that you will need 14 minutes to bake your 6" pizza.

The original instructions say to roll out the piece of dough to a size that is smaller than the pan size, whereas your instructions say to roll the dough piece out to the same size as your pan. I don't think that it will make much difference, but I will leave to you as to how to proceed. Moreover, since you are using the lower thickness factor value, I don't think you will have any leftover dough.

For the record, the dry non-fat milk is the Carnation's brand of dry non-fat milk as found in most supermarkets.

If you plan to make several dough balls, you might want to add 1.5% as a bowl residue compensation factor.

Good luck, and please let us know how things turn out.

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Trogdor33 on December 20, 2009, 01:25:02 AM
My family and I are going up to my parents house for the week and my mom wants me to make pizza one of the days we are up there. She is going to be amazed when she sees all the stuff I have to bring. I made 3 balls of my normal NY recipe, but since I will have two brand new lloyd pstk deep dish pans, I decided to make a couple PH pan dough balls to take up too. Since we won't get there until monday night, I cut down the yeast and am going to cold ferment until we get there and then roll out and proof at room temp until it is nice and puffy. I added the lactic acid because... well, I always add lactic acid now. Once you get used to that flavor, it's hard to go without.

      ounces   grams
KASL           100.00%   27.94   792.19
Water   55.56%   15.52   440.1
IDY           0.40%   0.11   3.17
Salt           0.88%   0.24   6.93
Oil           4.27%   1.19   33.83
NFDM           2.35%   0.66   18.63
Lactic Acid 0.70%   0.2   5.55

I pretty much followed xphmgr's instructions except that I had to hand knead after a few mins in the KA since the dough was so tough. Next time I may try adapting this recipe to a wet knead. I'll post pictures after I bake.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: yelloguy on December 31, 2009, 12:17:33 PM
Does this recipe require warm water?  I just finished making two crusts like it says.  Its been two hours but the crusts have not risen.  I am afraid if I put them in the fridge now, they will never rise.

When I make dough the usual ways, I use warm water and the dough balls double in size in an hour or so.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on December 31, 2009, 02:24:52 PM
yelloguy,

The recipe, at http://www.pizzamaking.com/panpizza.php, is silent as to water temperature and the room temperature. 

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: yelloguy on December 31, 2009, 03:18:29 PM
Thanks Pete.  Searching some more, I think my problem is not the water temp (it probably should be cold).  After 4 cups of flour, the dough looked nicely done.  But following the recipe, I added half cup more thinking it probably needs harder dough.  That was probably my fatal mistake since after running the dough maker for 10 minutes, I had to give it about 3 minutes more to make it smoother.  The dough came out so hard that I had to use a rolling pin to stretch/roll it and even then it took a lot of force.

I think its going to be a disaster in the evening.  But that should teach me not to try out new recipes in front of other people.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: JConk007 on January 14, 2010, 09:37:33 PM
Can Pan!
Got it! Last time I had too much dough in the pan and it rose to about 2" this time I halved it, and it was perfect. I forgot to weigh before placing in pan  :'(. I was going by feel and what I started with last time.
Anyway came out just like the PH Pan I purchased many a time, thickness, and crumb (tight air voids) were right on! Bottom golden brown soft with a almost fried bottom. I let the dough rise in the pan for a good hr. with EVOO on top then I laid down a nice layer of provolone. I know its not in the P Hut recipe, but I wanted to kick it up a notch, and it was a great taste! provy, sauce mozz,pepperoni, and more Grande. I cooked it about 15 min @400 center rack. Did this when I was done with the cracker. Because I wanted to go to both ends of the spectrum. I enjoyed this pizza very much!
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: epicalien on January 21, 2010, 02:00:14 AM
Pizza Hut Pan Pizza ( Makes one 14” Pan Pizza )
King Arthur Bread Flour      13.24oz
Great Value Bottled Water          7.36oz
Fleishmann’s Active Dry Yeast     0.16oz
Morton’s Kosher Salt           0.12oz
Vegetable Oil              0.57oz
Sugar                 0.25oz
Dry Non-Fat Milk           0.31oz
***This is a hybrid between my own personal tastes and xPHmgr’s Pizza Hut Recipe from the front page of this website.  I used quite a bit from xPHmgr’s recipe so I am not claiming this to be my original recipe.  I just had some excellent results with this hybrid and would love to give back to the community that has helped me so much.  I would still be making canned biscuit pizzas if it weren’t for you guys and gals. Ha ha***
Mix water and dry non-fat milk together.
Heat 1 minute on high heat in microwave (approx. 130-140 degrees) to disable the whey protein. (I read this somewhere.)  Then let cool to 105 degrees so you don’t kill the yeast.
Add yeast & mix thoroughly until fully dissolved.  Let stand for approx. 10 minutes.
Using the Paddle Attachment on “STIR” speed:
Pour the yeast/water mixture into the stand mixer bowl.
Add the flour, salt, & sugar to the stand mixer bowl and continue to mix.(about 2 min.)
Mix until the flour has absorbed & then add the vegetable oil & continue to mix.
(approx. 1 to 2 minutes)
Switch to the Spiral Dough Hook and knead on speed “2” for approx. 15 minutes.
Add a ½ cup (4oz) of vegetable oil to a 14” deep dish pizza pan.
Roll out the dough until it is 12” in diameter and put it into the 14” pan.
Cover the pan tightly with plastic wrap and allow to rise and fill the 14” pan.
I sprayed the underside of the plastic wrap with Pam’s cooking spray so the dough wouldn’t stick to it.
Place the pan into the fridge for 24 hours.
When ready to cook:
Take the pan out of the fridge and spray the crust ring with Pam Cooking Spray.
Press down the center part (everything but the crust ring) with your hands or an appropriate sized plastic lid.
Preheat the oven to 450 °F for 40 minutes with the pizza stone on bottom rack.
Add sauce, cheese, and toppings. (We used pepperoni, whole milk mozzarella, bacon, green peppers, and onions).
Bake at 450°F in the pan directly on the pizza stone for approximately 25 minutes or until crust is golden brown.
Pizza Hut Sauce I use (I think it tastes just like Pizza Hut’s sauce)
½ teaspoon Italian Seasoning
½ teaspoon Oregano
½ teaspoon Garlic Powder
½ teaspoon Sugar
1 (8 oz) can tomato sauce
1 (8 oz) can tomato paste
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: epicalien on January 21, 2010, 04:31:42 AM
Here's the pan I used.  It is a 14" Chicago Metallic Round bought from Amazon.com.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Biaviian on February 22, 2010, 10:03:11 AM
I did this (followed the recipe in the OP) and used 450of.  I also used olive oil in the dough because I didn't have any vegetable oil.  Then I realized that I didn't want to use olive oil in the pan so I borrowed some canola oil.  I found that there is way too much oil.  The crust just tasted like fried dough.  I also found that I didn't use enough sauce.  I just used a jarred sauce (Del Grosso NY Style Pizza Sauce).  I also used a low fat shredded mozzarella cheese.  I also let the dough sit in the fridge for 22.5 hours.  Before saucing the dough I pressed down the center of the dough (all but the crust ring). 

I then baked it for 20 minutes (the oven preheated for about 40 minutes and I baked it on the lowest rack on a stone) and allowed it to sit in the oven (oven off and door open about 10") for 5 minutes prior to cutting.  I used the same pan as the above poster.  I did find a few things. 


I'm not sure what to do about the last item but the rest I can take care of.  It did taste a lot like Pizza Hut.  I felt there was a little something missing but I feel the lack of sauce was the issue.  I'm sorry I didn't take any pictures but I didn't think of it until it was too late.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on February 22, 2010, 10:21:55 AM
Biavilian,

You might take a look at Reply 6 in this thread, at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4607.msg38909.html#msg38909.

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Biaviian on February 22, 2010, 01:57:00 PM
Thanks.  I read the entire thread last week but I forgot about (or skimmed over) that post.  It still doesn't help me with getting the inner crust thinner while keeping the thickness of the outer crust though.  Maybe I should weight down the inner crust while it is in the fridge.  I'm not really sure.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Puzzolento on February 22, 2010, 02:41:10 PM
I don't see anyone mentioning the weirdest thing about Pizza Hut pan pizza. Years ago, I went to pick one up at a small store in Austin, and after the kid threw it in the box, he asked if I wanted butter on the crust. He was holding a spray can full of garlic butter! Until then, I had always assumed the tasty grease on the crust was something that oozed out of the dough. It amazed me that there was such a thing as spray-on butter.

I told him I would pass.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: scott123 on February 22, 2010, 03:03:42 PM
Talking about greasy Pizza Hut pizza....

I grew up, where I am now, in NJ eating, imo, at some of best pizza places on the planet. I loved the stuff.  I went to college out in Illinois, and it was there where I had Pizza Hut for the first time.

CAUTION- if you are easily grossed out or a huge fan of Pizza Hut and want to remain that way, DO NOT READ on!!!

Anyway...  ;D It was a school thing, and they bought us as much pizza as we could eat. I've always been able to eat a lot, and back then was no exception. I gorged myself silly. It's kind of hard to remember exactly, but it could have been somewhere around the 3 pie mark.

When I came back to the dorm... I wasn't feeling too hot  :)  This pizza had no intention whatsoever of staying down.  So, off to the bathroom I went where I proceeded to heave the entire meal into one single toilet bowl.  My body rejected it entirely. Now, I'm not one to really analyze what comes out of me (in any form), but this was really kind of hard to miss.  Sitting in the bowl was about 3 inches of reddish/bready muck and, floating on top of that, was 4 solid inches of crystal clear oil. 4 inches of oil!!!

I kid you not  ;D
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Randy on February 23, 2010, 05:50:41 PM
Fried pizza is just about the right description but that is the way it is suppose to be. 

The canola would have been my last choice since it can give an off flavor to the crust.

I currently use this recipe to make a Chicago deep dish style pizza and really enjoy this crossover recipe but I use just enough oil to make a good coating in the pan which is much less oil.

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8410.0.html (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8410.0.html)

Randy
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Biaviian on February 23, 2010, 08:00:54 PM
It was either Canoloa or Olive Oil and I thought that Olive Oil would affect the flavor more.  Maybe I was wrong; I don't know.  I like the recipe you linked to and I think I'll give it a shot.  I asked in that thread but I'll ask here too.  How do you take the whole pizza out of the pan like that?
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Puzzolento on February 23, 2010, 08:59:09 PM
Canola oil should be outlawed, except for frying fish.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Randy on February 23, 2010, 09:22:44 PM
Yes I use a spring form pan, a cheap nonstick one at that so all you have to do is take the side off and slide it off the bottom.

I have use a 10" straight sided cake pan but it can be a challenge to get it out but it can be done.

If you like this pan recipe, you will really like the Chicago version.

Randy
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: gtsum2 on April 24, 2010, 11:45:28 PM
pan pizza is next on my list to try...I assume one can use a CI pan, or where is a good place to get a "pan pizza" pizza pan? 

This seems like a great and very informative site!
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Jackie Tran on April 25, 2010, 12:36:36 AM
Glad to see you made it over here Gtsum.  This is (for now) my other playground.   I have only been here a couple of months and my pizza and pizza knowledge has improved a lot thanks to the many helpful forum members. 

Coincidentally enough I found this place looking for a PH pan pizza recipe.  The one posted on this site by PHXmngr is a great recipe.  I also posted a PH sauce recipe that's very close.

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4452.0.html (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4452.0.html)

Again, welcome and you'll have lots of fun with your pizza adventure.   BTW, I'm working on a new Primo set up.  If all goes well I'll post the results on the other forum.

Not sure about the pan, but i have read of members using thick cake pans that seem to work well.  I see nothing wrong with a CI pan but maybe someone with actual experience can chime in.  I have a Pampered chef deep dish pizza stone that works really well. 

Tran
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: gtsum2 on April 25, 2010, 07:26:42 AM


thanks for the info...I may be bouncing some questions of you if you don't mind?!  Thanks again for telling me about this place...you were right...lots of good info here!
Title: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza - Proofing Question
Post by: Modegolf on April 25, 2010, 08:22:35 AM
Please help!  I am into making PH pan pizzas now and need advice on proofing.

I understand you can proof the dough either BEFORE putting it into the fridge for 4-24 hours, or AFTER the dough has been refrigerated (just before dressing and baking).

Here are my questions:

1.  Is there any difference to the flavor and/or texture of the dough whether it is proofed before or after cold fermentation?

2.  Why proof at all?  For example, with the PJ Clone or a NY Style, there is only one rise then forming and baking.  Is there a simple rule that tells me when I should proof a dough (which is actually a second rise) and when one rise is sufficient?

Thank you for your help!
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Randy on April 25, 2010, 08:57:51 AM
I think is best answer is, to some degree it will effect the flavor and the texture.  It is up to the individual decided how much.
If this is your first try I would stay with the recipe.

The individual rises(proof as you call them) also controls the texture.

Best to follow the recipe to get what the original author had in mind.

Randy
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on April 25, 2010, 10:48:37 AM
Modegolf,

Sometimes the matter of whether the dough should be allowed to "proof", or rise, before or after cold fermentation is a philosophical one. For example, Tom Lehmann, of the American Institute of Baking and an acknowledged expert on pizza doughs, prefers to cold ferment pretty much all pizza doughs and shape them later, after the cold fermentation. An example of a dough recipe that Tom has recommended for pan pizzas and where the shaping is done after cold fermentation is at the PMQ Think Tank at http://thinktank.pmq.com/viewtopic.php?p=37687#37687.

Usually, when one wants to achieve above average volume in a pizza crust, the dough is allowed to "proof", or rise, before baking. This is common for Sicilian, pan style and Greek/pan pizzas, and focaccia as well. It can actually be used for almost any style, including NY and a Papa John's American style pizza, although most people do not use a proof approach for those styles. Those doughs are tempered for a brief period but, unliike the other styles mentioned above, they are not proofed in order to get added height in the finished crust.

Whether a dough is to be subjected to a single or multiple fermentations is usually dictated by the dough recipe used. For example, Neapolitan style doughs often go through a bulk rise and individual rises after division. Emergency doughs intended to be made and used within a few hours also often go through two fermentation periods. I have seen a few dough recipes where dough balls are punched down one or more times during fermentation, both at room temperature and in the refrigerator, but those are not the most common methods. Absent a recipe and instructions to guide you as to when to use multiple fermentation periods, it will usually be as a result of a lot of experience and experimentation with doughs to tell you when you should use a single or multiple fermentations. There are no simple rules and often the course to take is not particularly intuitive.

You can read some other thoughts that I have had on this general subject at Reply 7 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,3798.msg31749.html#msg31749. You might also read the other posts in that thread.

I agree with Randy that one should follow the instructions given for a particular dough recipe. All too often, people freelance and when they get poor results they end up blaming the recipe rather than their deviations.

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Jackie Tran on April 25, 2010, 11:48:54 AM
Yes, I will third that as well (can I say that?  :P)  Stick with the recipe.

In my very limited pizza making experience, I have use both for different purposes.  The first proof or rise is commonly referred to as a "bulk rise" or even rest period.  From what I have read and have used it for, this period is commonly used when very little yeast is used in the formula with a goal of cold fermenting in the fridge for several days.  This kicks starts the yeast so that it will slowly work it's magic on the dough while in deep sleep.    The dough will usually slowly rise while in the fridge.  It is still working, but it's activity has been slowed down.  Without this bulk rise or rest period to kick start the yeast, the dough may not rise as much in the fridge.    The purpose of letting the dough cold ferment for long periods of time (vs baking it right away)  is to allow the yeast to make it's waste product and make the dough more flavorful.  It also changes the texture a bit. 
  The 2nd use of a bulk rise is commonly done when a sourdough starter (preferment) is used.  It is usually allowed to bulk rise or ferment at room temps for 4-20 hours or so prior to baking.  Depending on how much starter you use, you can leave it to bulk rise for shorter or longer periods. 

The room temp proof is used to allow the dough to come up to room temps after being in the fridge at a temp of 40F.  During this time, the yeast's activity is sped up and more gas (air bubbles) is produce leavening the dough further.  It serves 2 purpose (in my mind).  1) it allows the dough to become more pliable and workable. Easier to stretch and make a skin.  Some ppl stretch the dough within 1 hour of room temp proofing (or even just warming) while others will allow the dough to sit at room temps upwards of 9 hours without any problems.  Secondly, the room proofing allows the yeast to work further making the dough lighter and airier. You don't want the dough to double in size during this stage as you run the risk of getting a deflated pie.  The yeast can exhaust all of it's food source(s) and stop working, thus giving you little to no rise in the oven (oven spring).  You'll want the dough to proof to about 50-75% of it's original volume, but not doubled (100%).

How long you bulk rise, cold ferment, or room proof is really dependent on the amount of yeast (vs the amount of dough).  Less yeast and you can go longer with all of these times.  More yeast and you have to shorten the times.  That's why it's best to follow the recipe until you develop a feel for using a particular brand of yeast or a certain starter. 

This is my understanding of the subject, but please correct me if I'm wrong.  Hope that helps. 
Title: Thank You and Next Challenge
Post by: Modegolf on April 25, 2010, 01:47:18 PM
Thank you all for responding to my post on proofing.  I appreciate the speed and thoroughness of your answers.  You have helped boost my knowledge of home pizza making to the next level!

I now feel very confident about my ability to make a PJ Clone and a PH Pan Clone.  I have made LOTS of them and you have provided the last pieces of the puzzle for me.

In light of this newfound confidence, I have decided to tackle the Detroit Style (Buddy’s) pizza.  I am very nervous about the hydration level, but I will be sure to post to that thread with results and questions!

Thanks again for all your help.  :)
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on April 25, 2010, 02:12:42 PM
Tran,

Tom Lehmann often instructs the posters at the PMQ Think Tank to let their doughs temper AT room temperature rather than TO room temperature. As you will see from his PMQTT post at http://thinktank.pmq.com/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=7271&p=48918&hilit=#p48918, he even capitalizes the AT and TO just as I did. Quite often the room temperature in a particular situation is in the right range for tempering but you can imagine how letting a dough rise to a temperature of 90 degrees F (which is quite common near an oven in a pizzeria) or to a temperature of 60 degrees F (which might prevail in someone's kitchen in the dead of winter) would be unlikely to produce the desired outcomes.

On the matter of exhaustion of the yeast, I think it is perhaps more accurate to say that oven spring is more closely related to the moisture held in the dough at the time of baking and the pH of the dough and the related residual sugar level at the time of baking. You can read my quote from Prof. Calvel's book (The Taste of Bread) on this subject at Reply 136 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,5851.msg86732/topicseen.html#msg86732. You will also note that no yeast is needed in a dough to get oven spring, as Norma demonstrated recently in the last photo in Reply 13 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,10703.msg95354.html#msg95354.

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Jackie Tran on April 25, 2010, 03:02:47 PM
Thanks for the info Peter. I have recently changed my mind about the possibility of proofing in an hours time. I now do a proof at room temp rather than to room temps myself. Because I'm making higher hydration doughs these days, I have an easier time handling cool dough as oppose to room temp dough.
  I also didn't mean to imply that yeast is soley responsible for oven spring.  I only noted exhaustion of the dough since I have noticed that I get flatter pies if I cold ferment or proof to long.  I am aware that moisture and ultimately steam plays a large role in oven spring. It is fascinating to note that oven spring can be achieved without the use of yeast though.

Thanks again.   
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: xPHmgr on June 14, 2010, 05:17:14 PM
I guess when I originally posted this topic I should have given a little more background and more information in general... hind sight is 20/20... so here is my attempt in that direction.

If you have any questions... please ask...

I manage a Pizza Hut back in the late 1970's and early 1980's.  When I first worked there, we only sold Thin' N Crispy and Pan pizza.  So that is all have direct knowledge of.  When I first started we only made Thin' N Crispy pizzas... and the Pan pizza was introduced while I was working there.

I did not write down the recipes that we used to make the dough... but we did make the dough from scratch in the store every day.

I did not know that there was a difference in flours and so I did not even pay any attention to the types of flour that was used.  I do know that Pan pizza flour is different from Thin' N Crispy flour because when the Pan pizza was rolled out we were instructed to NEVER use Thin' N Crispy flour for Pan pizza... even if we ran out.

So I don't know anything about the frozen disks that I guess PH makes their Pan pizza from today.  I suspect that they went that route to keep their recipes more under lock and key than when I worked there.

For Pan pizza we used ordinary cake pans.  Not thick walled pans... just normal ordinary cake pans.

The Pan pizza was for all intents and purposes a fried pizza... which you have no doubt surmised by the quantity of oil that was used in the bottom of each pan.

I do remember a couple of things that stood out when they rolled out the Pan pizza.  The first thing I mentioned already and that is that the flour was different from the Thin' N Crispy flour.  The second thing was the "additions" to the Pan pizza dough that was not in the Thin' N Crispy dough.  I noticed these because I had made so many batches of Thin' N Crispy dough that when they told us what was in the Pan pizza dough... it just stuck out like a sore thumb.  The items that they added were; sugar and nonfat dry milk.

So if you see a recipe for Thin' N Crispy dough with sugar in it... it is wrong (at least it is not a PH Thin' N Crispy recipe from the late 70's and early 80's)... or if you see a Pan dough recipe without sugar and nonfat dry milk in it... it is wrong... at least not of the late 70's/early 80's vintage.

I remember that the Thin' N Crispy dough was a fairly dry dough.  Often times it would not even have collected all of the flour into the dough ball... there would always be some dry crumbs (my words... probably not the technical terms...) which you would just include in the food grade 40 Gal can with food liner.

I say all of that about the Thin' N Crispy dough... mainly to point out that the Pan dough was different... again... so it stood out.

The Pan dough ball had completely incorporated all of the flour into the dough ball.  So the Pan pizza dough was a much more like what you would normally think a dough would be like.

The Pan dough we would take out of the mixer (big Hobart floor standing mixer) and portion them (weigh them) and put them through the top part of our dough sheeter (of a 2 part dough sheeter).  If I had to guess... I'd say that it would take the dough and make it to be about 3/4 of an inch think.  Then we would stretch it to be more round (because it would come out of the dough sheeter being oblong-ed) and place it into an oiled pan.  These would sit on the counter (room temperature) until the dough had risen to be about 1 1/2 inches thick.  Once they had risen we would put them into the reach-in refrigerator.  We would only make enough Pan pizza dough that we would use that day... because at the end of the day we would throw out whatever Pan pizza dough we had not used.

Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on June 14, 2010, 05:52:20 PM
xPHmgr,

Welcome back. A lot of our members owe you for the success they have enjoyed with your PH pan pizza recipe.

The last PH ingredients list I have seen is the 2008 document at http://www.pizzahut.com/Files/PDF/PIZZA%20HUT%20INGREDIENT%20STATEMENTS%202008.pdf. (http://www.pizzahut.com/Files/PDF/PIZZA%20HUT%20INGREDIENT%20STATEMENTS%202008.pdf.) If you look at the ingredients list for the Pan Dough, you can tell that the dough is frozen because the yeast is very high up in the list. That means that PH is using more yeast than any other ingredient other than the flour and water. The reason for using much more yeast is because yeast cells are destroyed by freezing. So, to compensate for that loss, they just use a lot more yeast. That moves the yeast high up in the list. Some of the chemical-sounding ingredients in the Pan Dough list are also often used to make frozen doughs. You will also note that whey is now used in the PH Pan Dough.

If you look at the ingredients list for the Thin 'N Crispy Dough, you will see that there is no sugar, as was the case during your PH tenure, and also that the yeast is in its normal position near the bottom of the ingredients list. That tells us that the Thin 'N Crispy crusts are made in the normal manner, and are most likely par-baked crusts. Those crusts can be frozen for delivery to their stores, where they can be defrosted/refrigerated for use in filling orders. I might be wrong on this, but I do not believe that Thin 'N Crispy Doughs are made fresh in the PH stores anymore. I understand that PH is using fresh doughs in some of their stores outside of the U.S., such as in Malaysia and the Phillipines.

Peter

EDIT (4/20/13): For the Wayback Machine link to the above Pizza Hut pdf document, see http://web.archive.org/web/20100602083641/http://www.pizzahut.com/Files/PDF/PIZZA%20HUT%20INGREDIENT%20STATEMENTS%20September%202008.pdf (http://web.archive.org/web/20100602083641/http://www.pizzahut.com/Files/PDF/PIZZA%20HUT%20INGREDIENT%20STATEMENTS%20September%202008.pdf)
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Randy on June 15, 2010, 06:42:55 AM
xPHmgr, good to see you posting again.  I took your recipe and used it to make a pizza in the Chicago style.  It is wonderful adaptation of your excellent recipe. 

I made it Sunday a a matter of fact.

Randy

Deep Dish pizza
In the Chicago style
Based on xPHmgr Rexipe
Tuesday, June 15, 2010

For a single 10” spring form pan or cake pan

6.3 oz water room temperature
1 tsp instant dry yeast
.3 oz or 1 1/2  Tablespoons Powdered Milk
11.3 oz King Arthur Bread flour
1 teaspoon salt
.2 oz or 1/2 Tablespoon sugar
.5 oz  or 1 Tablespoon of Classico Olive oil

·   In a stand mixer (KitchenAid) fitted with a dough hook, add the water, yeast and powdered milk.  Run on stir  or low speed until yeast has fully dissolved.
·   Mix the remaining dry ingredients together in a separate container and add them to the mixer while still on stir speed.
·   Switch to speed 2 or knead speed until most of the flour and water have mixed.
·   Add oil while the dough is still scrappy then it will quickly form a moist, smooth cohesive ball.
·   Knead on speed 2 for 10 minutes
·   Put 2 tablespoons of  classico olive oil in the 10" pan to make sure that the oil completely covers the bottom.
·   After the dough has been kneaded for 10 minutes, remove it from the mixing bowl and roll it out to the diameter of the bottom of the pan press it into the pan stretching the dough with your finger tips trying not to get too much oil on the pan sides so the dough will stick better.  Press the dough in place so the sides come up about 11/2"-2”
·   Cover with plastic wrap and let the dough rise for 2 hours on the counter then place the pan (still covered) into the refrigerator for at least 4 hours (up to 24 hours).

WHEN READY TO MAKE

·   Remove dough from the refrigerator two to three hours in advance then press down the bottom of the dough with your finger tip in a random fashion then using your fingers press the dough, flatting the sides in place.
·   After two or three hours, preheat oven to 450F.  Add a half pound of mozzarella to the bottom, then topping of your choice then a cup of sauce with 1/2 of a small can of diced tomatoes well drained added, put that on top of the pizza.
·   Bake at 450 °F for 20 minutes.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: xPHmgr on June 15, 2010, 11:33:25 AM
Thanks... I'm glad that it has worked out well for people.

The irony is that I actually prefer the Thin' N Crispy crust... and I have had one heck of a time trying to exactly duplicate it... but I'm back on the hunt and will let you know if I am able to duplicate it.  I think my initial attempts have been quite a bit off from the science of flour, moisture and pizza dough... but I don't give up easily...  :D

Randy, I'll have to give that a try some time... I've never tried to make a Chicago style pizza before but the Pan pizza dough would probably be really good dough for that...
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: chillin on July 06, 2010, 01:17:46 AM
Does anybody know what the adjustment would be for high altitude (>5,000ft)?
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: hopingforpizza on February 07, 2011, 02:01:05 PM
Just a quick note after reading this thread (which has been informative to say the least) is about the question of weather or not to proof/double rise this dough.   I think it's more of a question of crumb than it is flavor.  Using a controlled rise will produce a nice flavor under most circumstances, but in this case the crumb has to be almost "just so".  I am a huge fan of PH pan pizzas and the combination of light texture, medium to medium fine crumb and that perfectly fried finish is indeed it's own.  I think if you try to make this guy w/ a single rise method the crumb will be too coarse and it just won't have that deep-fried twinkie kind of liteness that we all know and love ; ).   One other thing to try too would be to use a high quality vegetable shortening rather than straight oil as it adheres up the sides of the pan at or below room temp and seems to give the sides of the crust about the same treatment as the bottom.   Just my thoughts.     Enjoy Everyone!
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: awlingbeck on February 15, 2011, 10:23:45 AM
Every Pizza Hut Deep Pan Pizza dough I've seen shows oil in the recipe and when I made the dough at Pizza hut we didn't add any oil to the dough, only water and the powder they sent us.  We however did add vegetable oil to the pan for cooking purposes (enough to coat the bottom of the pan with about 1/8 of an inch seemed a bit excessive to most of us working there) before adding the dough to the pan and placing it in the proofer at 95 degrees F for about 90 minutes and another 90 minutes in the refrigerator to cool.  The cooling process was to make the dough firm for adding toppings to it otherwise the dough was thin in the middle. If you ever get the actual pans Pizza hut uses for pan dough you will see 2 lines on the inside of the pan that show where the dough should rise to during the proofing process.  If I remember correctly it was 16 ounces of dough for a 12" pizza and 22 ounces for a 14 inch pizza rolled out evenly before being placed in the pan.

My other favorite dough is Stuffed Crust, however I've been a little bummed about finding a non commercial "garlic butter spray" that we used for spraying on the crust.  Anyone have any ideas where to find something like that?  Pam creates a butter spray, but doesn't taste the same as the garlic butter spray.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: awlingbeck on February 15, 2011, 10:49:31 AM
Peter:
sorry won't let me quote you because of the hyperlink

Lots of interesting stuff there, You are right that most dough is not made in the stores any more.  However I do believe that some smaller towns still make the dough by hand because it saves them on their food cost.  The cost of buying the frozen dough is prohibitive to some stores because they cannot keep their food cost under the specific gross sales percent that the companies would like them to have.  I remember having to spend many hours preparing dough for the night shift, since all extra dough was thrown out for the next day per policy, however sometimes it got used on the buffet for the next morning. When I first started working at the particular Pizza Hut I worked at we had 2 sometimes 3 people preparing dough for the day because we were making the "Bigfoot" Pizza then which for some reason our town loved and others did not.  We would go through a minimum of 100 of them a day where other towns wouldn't use 100 in a week. Now they have the "Dippers" which look like the same size as the Bigfoot.  The Dippers looks more like a pan dough though where the Bigfoot was a hand tossed style dough.  The difference being there were holes in the bottom of the pan for the Bigfoot and just sprayed with a food release product and the dippers appears to have oil in the pan causing the "fry bread" appearance and taste.  
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on February 15, 2011, 10:52:42 AM
awlingbeck,

Can you tell us how long ago it was that you worked for PH and made their pan pizzas? The reason I ask is that some time ago I found a PH ingredients document, which I printed out for my own use, that showed oil in the dough. I did a Google search this morning and found the document (pdf) at http://www.espanol.pizzahut.com/menu/nutritioninfo/documents/ph_ingredients.pdf. That document is dated July 29, 2004. The ingredients for the pan pizza dough are set forth at page 4. One of the things I noticed in the ingredients list for the pan pizza dough is the omission of water. It is hard to say whether that was an omission or it was intentional (note that two of the other dough ingredients lists also omit the water). If it was intentional, that could suggest that the ingredients shown were part of a dry mix, hence the omission of the water. It is quite common to include a spray dried form of oil for such mixes. I can't say that that was what PH was using but it can't be ruled out as a possibility. It's also possible that the PH document mentioned above was for locations outside of the U.S. You will note, for example, the inclusion of the word "espanol" in the URL for the document.

Your information on the dough weights for the two size pizzas confirms what other former PH employees have stated on the forum.

Once you get to five posts, you should be able to include links in your posts.

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: matermark on March 10, 2011, 01:00:44 PM
Just a quick note after reading this thread (which has been informative to say the least) is about the question of weather or not to proof/double rise this dough.   I think it's more of a question of crumb than it is flavor.  Using a controlled rise will produce a nice flavor under most circumstances, but in this case the crumb has to be almost "just so".  I am a huge fan of PH pan pizzas and the combination of light texture, medium to medium fine crumb and that perfectly fried finish is indeed it's own.  I think if you try to make this guy w/ a single rise method the crumb will be too coarse and it just won't have that deep-fried twinkie kind of liteness that we all know and love ; ).   One other thing to try too would be to use a high quality vegetable shortening rather than straight oil as it adheres up the sides of the pan at or below room temp and seems to give the sides of the crust about the same treatment as the bottom.   Just my thoughts.     Enjoy Everyone!

Funny you should mention that, because my local Pizza Hut always brushed shortening into the pan--while waiting for my pizza to get done, I always observed them brushing a white colored shortening or lard--never have I seen them pouring any oil!

Ever since then, I incorporate the same procedure on my double crust "Old Forge White Pizzas."
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: xsosx on October 17, 2011, 03:40:49 PM
This is my first attempt at making a Pizza Hut pan pizza clone. I generally make New York-style pizzas but my family loves Pizza Hut. The recipe I used for this was the 22 ounce scaled version that Pete-zza calculated in another thread (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4607.msg38909.html#msg38909). My directions are as follows:

The yeast was added to the water and allowed to activate and dissolve for 10 minutes. Next, I mixed in the salt, sugar, and dry non-fat milk. This combination was poured into a KitchenAid mixer followed by flour and vegetable oil. After a 10 minute kneed using the hook attachment, I let the dough rest, covered, inside the mixing bowl for 10 minutes before rolling it out into a 12-inch circle. The dough was then placed into a Chicago Metallic Non Stick 14-Inch Deep Dish Pizza Pan (http://www.amazon.com/Chicago-Metallic-Stick-14-Inch-Pizza/dp/B003YKGS4A/?tag=pizzamaking-20) (epicalien recommended this pan earlier in this thread) with 4 ounces of vegetable oil placed in the bottom. The top was covered using plastic wrap and the dough was proofed for 1 hour. Afterwards, I placed the dough into the refrigerator for approximately 12 hours. It was removed 2 hours before baking.

I preheated the oven to 500F with a FibraMent stone placed on the middle rack. Before topping, I slightly depressed the middle of the dough, leaving a 1 inch edge-crust. The pizza was topped with Jackie Tran's sauce recipe (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4452.msg92245.html#msg92245), which was a near-perfect imitation of Pizza Hut's. I used 2 cups of low moisture part skim mozzarella (though I saw an ex-Pizza Hut employee say that they used 3 cups on their large pan pizzas, 4.5 if it's a cheese pizza). Half of the cheese was put on top of the sauce, followed by diced onions and green peppers, then the other half of the cheese. I finished topping it with pepperonis. Before going into the oven, I sprayed the edge crust with a vegetable oil cooking spray. The pizza was baked for 12 minutes on the stone.

The pizza turned out great and it will be a recipe that I try again in the future. Thanks to everyone who put in effort on cloning this!
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on October 17, 2011, 04:01:18 PM
xsosx

That is a beautiful looking pizza. Congratulations. It looks like you followed the directions well.

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: matermark on October 17, 2011, 08:03:40 PM
Hey that looks great! Now next time bring it up to SUPER Supreme specs and let me know when it's ready and I'll give you ten bucks! ;)
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: johnamus on October 18, 2011, 08:26:17 AM
That is a great looking pizza, how did the taste compare to the real deal?
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Jackie Tran on October 18, 2011, 09:11:24 AM
Xsosx, that looks better than the real deal.  Congrats, I'm sure it ate very well.

Chau
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: xsosx on October 19, 2011, 05:18:19 PM
Hey that looks great! Now next time bring it up to SUPER Supreme specs and let me know when it's ready and I'll give you ten bucks! ;)

Haha. I do plan on using more toppings next time.

That is a great looking pizza, how did the taste compare to the real deal?

Thank you! It was very close the the original, especially the crust texture. I wish I had taken a photo of the underside, because it had that fried dough, golden-brown look and feel that is a very distinguishing feature of Pizza Hut pan pizza.

Xsosx, that looks better than the real deal.  Congrats, I'm sure it ate very well.

Thank you for your sauce recipe. The whole pizza was gone within 15 minutes!

I'm not sure if anyone can answer this question but is the pan dough the same dough that Pizza Hut uses for their breadsticks?
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Jackie Tran on October 19, 2011, 06:53:48 PM
Xsosx, I'm pretty positive the dough for their pan pizza is the same for their breadsticks.  If not it is very similar.  I have made breadsticks with this dough with good results.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: FeCheF on November 15, 2011, 01:50:02 PM
My wife recently bought me a 16" heavy duty cake pan so can someone scale this recipe up for me please (pete  :D). Im not good with baker percents though, so if you could use grams that would be appreciated.

And Xsosx, your pie looks fabulous.

Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on November 15, 2011, 02:11:25 PM
FeCheF,

I explain how to do the conversion at Reply 140 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,213.msg84184.html#msg84184. In your case, you want to use the thickness factor 0.14291 in the expanded dough calculating tool (the Thickness Factor option) along with the 16" pizza size. If you have trouble coming up with the dough formulation for your 16" pizza pan or you would like me to review your numbers, let me know.

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: FeCheF on November 15, 2011, 02:46:25 PM
FeCheF,

I explain how to do the conversion at Reply 140 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,213.msg84184.html#msg84184. In your case, you want to use the thickness factor 0.14291 in the expanded dough calculating tool (the Thickness Factor option) along with the 16" pizza size. If you have trouble coming up with the dough formulation for your 16" pizza pan or you would like me to review your numbers, let me know.

Peter

Peter, I used the percents in replay 140 link above and came up with this formula but i dont know if its correct because im not sure if im supposed to use the same percents as a 14" or if somehow supposed to calculate a higher percentages? Im kinda lost when it comes to these percents. I really dont know how to calculate this.Anyway I tried that expanded dough calculator and here is the results.

Flour (100%):
Water (55.555%):
ADY (1.18518%):
Salt (0.875%):
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (4.27199%):
Sugar (1.875%):
Dry Non-Fat Milk (2.35155%):
Total (166.11372%):
490.39 g  |  17.3 oz | 1.08 lbs
272.44 g  |  9.61 oz | 0.6 lbs
5.81 g | 0.21 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.54 tsp | 0.51 tbsp
4.29 g | 0.15 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.77 tsp | 0.26 tbsp
20.95 g | 0.74 oz | 0.05 lbs | 4.61 tsp | 1.54 tbsp
9.19 g | 0.32 oz | 0.02 lbs | 2.31 tsp | 0.77 tbsp
11.53 g | 0.41 oz | 0.03 lbs | 8.02 tsp | 2.67 tbsp
814.6 g | 28.73 oz | 1.8 lbs | TF = 0.14291
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on November 15, 2011, 02:55:01 PM
FeCheF,

You done good ;D. Now I look forward to your results.

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: FeCheF on November 15, 2011, 03:09:06 PM
FeCheF,

You done good ;D. Now I look forward to your results.

Peter

Thanks peter, but are the percentages correct for a 16" pan?
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on November 15, 2011, 03:21:07 PM
Thanks peter, but are the percentages correct for a 16" pan?

Yes, they are. The baker's percents are the same for all pan sizes.

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: FeCheF on November 21, 2011, 01:24:17 PM
Well, I tried this recipe last night and was very unhappy. The crust was really dry and way too crunchy on the bottom. I followed the recipe and baked it on my pizza stone for 15 minutes. I  preheated to 500 and lowered to 450 for the 15 minute bake time. The bottom wasnt burnt at all and was golden brown but was so crunchy it tore up the roof of my mouth. Very dissapointing to say the least. Anyway here are some pics.

Also it was refigerated overnight and flavor of crust was very bland.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: rcbaughn on May 03, 2012, 04:52:29 PM
Does anyone else think that this pizza is almost better reheated in the oven than it is fresh?! I reheated a slice last night and I swear is was crispier but more tender at the same time. The toppings seemed like they were more flavorful as well and the sauce had integrated into the crust ever so slightly. I am very impressed with this pizza though after last night, to me the ability of a pizza to reheat well is the sign of a good pie.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: DNA Dan on May 03, 2012, 06:45:34 PM
For replicating PH it actually doesn't look bad at all. Did you use a lot of oil in the pan? Perhaps it was cooked a bit too hot?
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: rcbaughn on May 11, 2012, 10:20:28 PM
I've noticed most people baking these pies use a darker colored 14" pan, but all I can find locally in that size range is light aluminum pans from smaller kitchen stores. I even checked the stock at my local restaurant supply store. The aluminum ones I have found are relatively cheap at $7, but I hate to buy one and it not turn out the pie that I am shooting for, it would have no other use in my kitchen. Has anyone had great luck with light colored aluminum pans? This is my second favorite pizza style so far next to the Mellow Mushroom clone, so I'd like to at least get good equipment to make it on.

P.S. - I have been rising and baking mine on a flat 15" cutter pan and I feel like that may be the reason I am not getting as pronounced of a cornicione since the pie doesn't have a pan wall to "climb." It also makes for quite a mess when you move the pan around. Oil spills everywhere and losing any amount of oil isn't good for the frying of the bottom I bet.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on May 12, 2012, 07:50:29 AM
I've noticed most people baking these pies use a darker colored 14" pan, but all I can find locally in that size range is light aluminum pans from smaller kitchen stores. I even checked the stock at my local restaurant supply store. The aluminum ones I have found are relatively cheap at $7, but I hate to buy one and it not turn out the pie that I am shooting for, it would have no other use in my kitchen. Has anyone had great luck with light colored aluminum pans? This is my second favorite pizza style so far next to the Mellow Mushroom clone, so I'd like to at least get good equipment to make it on.

Cory,

Unless you purchase a dark anodized deep-dish pan, which requires no seasoning, or unless you purchase a used deep-dish pan that is already seasoned (e.g., on eBay or elsewhere), you might season your aluminum deep-dish pan. As you will note from Tom Lehmann's posts over at the PMQ Think Tank at http://thinktank.pmq.com/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=8016&p=55383&hilit=#p55280, he suggests that you season the outside of the pan. The inside of the pan will become seasoned over time with normal use.

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: buceriasdon on May 12, 2012, 08:48:31 AM
I second Peter's recommendation to season a bare aluminum pan if necessary. I just seasoned a steel large muffin pan to bake my slider rolls and sprayed a light coat of kitchen spray, baked it for a hour at 400 or until dry, then repeated the process. Maybe even three times if needed. It is quite dark and the rolls fall out quite easily.  Don't use olive oil, a light coat of Pam is better.
Don
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: CDNpielover on May 12, 2012, 10:50:56 AM
I had an aluminium pan, too, and seasoned it using about 4 cycles of corn oil in a hot oven.  worked great.  just do a google search for how to season a pan.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: rcbaughn on May 12, 2012, 12:41:34 PM
I had no idea that you seasoned aluminum as you would cast iron, that is a completely new concept and an exciting one at that. I have quite a few newer pans at home that could use this treatment. I will be sure to give this a go this next week when I get back to college and do the research on it then too. Thanks a ton guys. -Cory
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Chicago Bob on May 12, 2012, 08:28:29 PM
Does anyone else think that this pizza is almost better reheated in the oven than it is fresh?! I reheated a slice last night and I swear is was crispier but more tender at the same time. The toppings seemed like they were more flavorful as well and the sauce had integrated into the crust ever so slightly. I am very impressed with this pizza though after last night, to me the ability of a pizza to reheat well is the sign of a good pie.
Oh yes....I think there is a thread on that somewhere Cory. Lots of people have been discovering the reheat in a frying pan trick. I use a cast iron pan...much easier than heating the oven up and as many have found out , it can turn some pizzas into something quite different and even better.

Bob
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: rcbaughn on May 14, 2012, 09:21:34 PM
Oh yes....I think there is a thread on that somewhere Cory. Lots of people have been discovering the reheat in a frying pan trick. I use a cast iron pan...much easier than heating the oven up and as many have found out , it can turn some pizzas into something quite different and even better.

Bob

I haven't done the pan method but I have heard of it. It sure would be a lot more efficient instead of waiting on my stone to get up to temp and when the pan is covered you'd get the same effects of the oven as well. Next time I'll give that a go, thanks for reminding me of that.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: DarqMan on May 14, 2012, 11:06:47 PM
When I was a kid, Pizza Hut pan pizza was always my fav.  Just one question for anyone who has successfully made this pizze.  The recipe states to add 4oz oil to the pan before adding the dough to let it rise.  Is 4oz an accurate measurement?  That's half a cup....  ???
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Chicago Bob on May 14, 2012, 11:20:17 PM
I haven't done the pan method but I have heard of it. It sure would be a lot more efficient instead of waiting on my stone to get up to temp and when the pan is covered you'd get the same effects of the oven as well. Next time I'll give that a go, thanks for reminding me of that.
Using the lid won't give the same effects as the oven...you'll see...
I jus drape a piece of aluminum foil, shiney side down
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: rcbaughn on May 15, 2012, 01:55:10 AM
Oh so just tent the skillet with foil while I'm reheating the slice instead of putting on the cast iron lid for a sec?
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Chicago Bob on May 15, 2012, 11:41:01 AM
Yes,lets the steam out but still helps to melt the cheese....you can make the crust really crispy using this method and that's why I said the end result is often something even better than what you started with...
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: rcbaughn on May 16, 2012, 01:24:44 AM
Thanks a lot for the tip! I tried this tonight and it worked pretty well. I may or may not have put just a touch of butter in the pan though before adding the pizza..... :-D It tasted awesome awesome awesome.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Chicago Bob on May 16, 2012, 10:55:21 AM
Good deal... that's what I meant about being able to make the crust really crispy and changing the whole profile. Try corn oil next time....works great on deep dish...
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: PowerWagonPete on July 12, 2012, 09:06:13 AM
PowerWagonPete's a Pizza Slut Pan Pizza...

http://ramchargercentral.com/open-discussions/hey-greg/   ;D
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Chicago Bob on July 12, 2012, 10:08:20 AM
Pete,

You don't give yourself enough credit...that pie is NOT "dead on" to a big rip-off PH pizza. You did nail something there though....sum'in awesome!   ;)

Man.....now I got another on the to-do list   :'(

Bob
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: PowerWagonPete on July 12, 2012, 10:41:48 AM
Pete,

You don't give yourself enough credit...that pie is NOT "dead on" to a big rip-off PH pizza. You did nail something there though....sum'in awesome!   ;)

Man.....now I got another on the to-do list   :'(

Bob

LOL   ;)  ;)

The sad truth is, both pan and Sicilian-type pizzas tend to wipe us both out so we'll end up spending a romantic evening together slobbering all over our respective recliners instead of each other.  That stuff puts you in a coma quicker than eating Thanksgiving turkey during a Detroit Lions football game.  Today's television is much more palatable when viewed through the eyelids, however, so there is an advantage there.   ::)

Yeah, the to-do list never seems to get any shorter, huh Bob?   :)

I went back into both threads and fixed the fubar hyperlinks.  Everything should work just fine now.   ;D
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Giggliato on September 16, 2012, 11:11:25 AM
When I was a kid, Pizza Hut pan pizza was always my fav.  Just one question for anyone who has successfully made this pizze.  The recipe states to add 4oz oil to the pan before adding the dough to let it rise.  Is 4oz an accurate measurement?  That's half a cup....  ???

That sounds about right lol, I used to oil the Pizza Hut pans. On a side note I recently deep fried a disk before baking and in the end the taste reminded me of the pizza hut pan pizza.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: junkbot on October 09, 2012, 05:04:38 PM
Is there any way to make this recipe into a no-knead dough? Kitchen is tiny, and I don't have a stand mixer.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Steven 86 on October 14, 2012, 05:17:58 PM
Recipe works OK, however after weeks of refinement I think I might have just cracked it.

I am using a "pizza maker" pizza oven (which reaches heat of around 570 deg f) so have an unfair advantage.


Nonetheless with the current recipe I have found the pizza to be either to anaemic or too overcooked.

I think increasing the proportion of milk powder (to increase browning) and increase water has made a big difference. I also think using a cast iron pan (i use a skillet) and having a double rising process will make this the best it can be.


Here's my version below. As i said my pizza oven may help but I believe the following amendments should give an improved version in a conventional oven (i'll try this sometime):


For 3 pizzas:


To pan of bread mixer add:

Wet ingredients : add 1 and 1/2 cups of warm water and 2 tbsp olive oil.

Dry ingredients: On top add 4 and 1/8 cups of all purpose flour, 1/2 cup skimmed milk powder (e.g. marvel), 1 tsp salt, 1 tbsp brown sugar, 1 package yeast (7grams).

Allow bread machine to knead for 10 minutes.

When kneaded, coat dough in thin layer of olive oil in a bowl. Cover bowl and allow to rise for half an hour.

Add 1.5 oz olive oil (with optional garlic salt) to 10 inch cast iron skillets.

Roll out around 1/4 inch thick, and put in skillet. Cover skillet (as air tight as possible), with a solid cover.

put in an oven warmed to 95 deg c which has been switched off.

Allow to rise for an hour.

Take out, spray crust with spray release (e.g. fry light). Top with sauce, cheese then toppings, then oregano.

Heat pizza oven to 2, put pizza in and then switch to nearly 3. If using conventional oven put the skillet on a preheated pizza stone on the top rack. Preheat the oven on full whack for a full half an hour before doing so.

Cook for around 7 mins.

Someone please try and let me know what you think!


Thanks

Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: slybarman on November 30, 2012, 10:12:19 AM
Is the recipe in the OP, the current go-to recipe for Pizza Hut pan pizza at home, or has someone built a better mouse trap over the years in another thread?

My 6 year old son had pan pizza the other day and is now hooked. :)
Title: Re: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: slybarman on January 10, 2013, 06:21:48 PM
I am going to try this one over the weekend.  A couple questions:
1) is a cast iron skillet appropriate for making pan pizza?
2) am I putting the cold pan and dough into the oven? Does the cold pan heat up quickly enough on its own?
Title: Re: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Chicago Bob on January 10, 2013, 06:28:34 PM
I am going to try thisnone over the weekend.  A couple questions:
1) is a cast iron skillet appropriate for making pan pizza?
2) am I putting the cold pan and dough into the oven? Does the cold pan heat up quickly enough on its own?
Steven 86 cast iron pan method looks pretty good, no?  1 post above yours...
Title: Re: Re: Re: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: slybarman on January 10, 2013, 06:37:25 PM
Steven 86 cast iron pan method looks pretty good, no?  1 post above yours...

LOL. Good thing it didn't have teeth or it would have bit my nose. I am not sure I get the point of putting the skillet on top of a pizza stone. Is it for heat transfer?
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Chicago Bob on January 10, 2013, 06:43:01 PM
Well, sorta...it transfers the heat more evenly.  ;)
But if one does not have a stone...the cast iron pan's qualities(thick)help even browning/cooking alone by itself.

Also, for the 1.5oz oil coating on bottom of skillet I would not use olive oil...your favorite regular 'ol oil will be fine. Throw some corn, veg, or canola and crisp that baby up.   8)
Title: Re: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: slybarman on January 10, 2013, 07:08:21 PM
Thanks Bob. I must have skipped the entire middle of this thread when I read it. I just saw the pictures of n powerwagonpete's pie in cast iron and it looked very good.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Chicago Bob on January 10, 2013, 07:14:30 PM
Yep, Pete's got it go'in on.  :chef:
Even the professionals(like..not me!) miss some specs from time to time...it's natural!  8)
Title: Re: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: slybarman on January 11, 2013, 11:14:53 PM
I have my first tries in the refrigerator for the cold rise.  The dough looked ok to me. Man that sure seems like a lot of oil in the pan. Fingers crossed.

I was thinking about the powdered milk. Doesnt it just rehydrate and become milk?  What is the benefit of powdered milk over regular milk?
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: slybarman on January 12, 2013, 02:26:29 PM
Not a success, but not a total failure either. The taste was decent, but I ended up with way too much dough relative to sauce cheese. the dough way just too thick. I used the recipe in the original post and split it into two 9" pans (lodge logic calls it a 9" pan, but the actual cooking surface is about 7 1/2" diameter). I think I could have done four pies from the recipe. The pan in the picture is 1 3/4" deep.

Because the crust was too thick, it did not really cook enough all the way through. Cutting the thickness in half or so should fix that.

Also, I think the oil could be cut in about half.

I have photos but gave up on trying to upload them to the site. The server was having none of it.
Title: Re: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on January 12, 2013, 03:15:12 PM
I was thinking about the powdered milk. Doesnt it just rehydrate and become milk?  What is the benefit of powdered milk over regular milk?

Steve,

I am a little bit late on this but pretty much everything you want to know about milk in a dough can be read in this recent PMQ Think Tank post by Tom Lehmann: http://thinktank.pmq.com/viewtopic.php?p=84770&sid=6533e396c0801023e2f7c7ae9b386694#p84770.

For several years, before Pizza Hut went to frozen dough in the U.S., it used dry milk products in some of its doughs. These days, there aren't many chains or pizza operators who do so. Vito & Nick's, who specialize in the Chicago thin-crust style pizza, use fresh milk, as do some pizza operators who specialize in the Greek-style pizza. Round Table used dry milk in its dough at one point and may still be doing so, and I believe that Donatos went from fresh milk to dry milk.

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Chicago Bob on January 12, 2013, 03:21:44 PM
So adding 1% grocery store dry milk will not add any favorable effects on the dough.....hmmm.
Title: Re: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: slybarman on January 12, 2013, 03:31:25 PM
I saw earlier in the thread someone said the whey contributed to browning. Is there a difference in whey between powdered milk and liquid milk?
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on January 12, 2013, 03:34:15 PM
Not a success, but not a total failure either. The taste was decent, but I ended up with way too much dough relative to sauce cheese. the dough way just too thick. I used the recipe in the original post and split it into two 9" pans (lodge logic calls it a 9" pan, but the actual cooking surface is about 7 1/2" diameter). I think I could have done four pies from the recipe. The pan in the picture is 1 3/4" deep.

Because the crust was too thick, it did not really cook enough all the way through. Cutting the thickness in half or so should fix that.

Steve,

A lot of members had trouble with the amount of dough called for in the original PH pan dough recipe.  For that reason, I scaled the recipe down to the actual amount of dough that PH was using for its 14" size pizza. You can see the scaled down version at Reply 6 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4607.msg38909.html#msg38909. The thickness factor for that recipe is 0.14291. If you use that thickness factor in the expanded dough calculating tool along with all of the other numbers (baker's percents) in the recipe in Reply 6 referenced above, you should be able to make as many pizzas as you would like and in any desired size.

Peter
Title: Re: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: slybarman on January 12, 2013, 03:56:15 PM
Cool - thanks peter.
Title: Re: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on January 12, 2013, 04:04:35 PM
I saw earlier in the thread someone said the whey contributed to browning. Is there a difference in whey between powdered milk and liquid milk?

Steve,

I can't say for sure but I would imagine if that you add back the right amount of water to reconstitute the particular dried form of milk (whole, nonfat, reduced-fat, etc.), the whey content should be the same unless the drying process destroyed part of the whey. If you research the different forms of liquid milk at the NutritionData.Self website at http://nutritiondata.self.com/, you will see that the range of water content for the different forms of milk is about 87-89%.

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: slybarman on January 12, 2013, 04:10:23 PM
Good info Peter.

I used the dough calculator as you suggested. My 9" cast iron pans have a 7 1/2" cooking surface. I am not sure if that means I should use a 7 1/2" pie in the calculator or something smaller as the original recipe called for making a 12" dough for the 14" pan. Of course, I don't know if his 14" pan actually had a 14" cooking surface! Aye caramba.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on January 12, 2013, 04:38:57 PM
I used the dough calculator as you suggested. My 9" cast iron pans have a 7 1/2" cooking surface. I am not sure if that means I should use a 7 1/2" pie in the calculator or something smaller as the original recipe called for making a 12" dough for the 14" pan. Of course, I don't know if his 14" pan actually had a 14" cooking surface! Aye caramba.
Steve,

You can see how the thickness factor and pan sizes are used in the expanded dough calculating tool at Reply 140 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,213.msg84184.html#msg84184. Since your dimensions suggest that your cast iron pans have sloping sides, with the major diameter being 9" and the minor diameter being 7 1/2", you might want to use something between those two numbers in the expanded dough calculating tool. Maybe 8" or 8 1/4" will do the trick. You can always tweak the numbers further in the future if you generally like the results you get.

In case you end up liking your next PH pan pizza, you might also want to take a look at a cross between the PH pan pizza and the Godfather's pizza as discussed starting at Reply 15 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,12806.msg132091.html#msg132091. Jet_deck (Gene) decided to try the formulation I set forth in Reply 15 but threw me a curveball when he said that he wanted to substitute evaporated milk for the dry milk powder. That led to the changes described in Reply 19 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,12806.msg132454.html#msg132454. You can see Gene's results starting at Reply 25 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,12806.msg132648.html#msg132648. With a different pan size, some rejiggering of the numbers would be required.

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: slybarman on January 12, 2013, 05:03:44 PM
Good info as always Pete. If I plug in numbers for 2 dough balls at 8" I get

Flour (100%):    247.99 g  |  8.75 oz | 0.55 lbs
Water (55.555%):    137.77 g  |  4.86 oz | 0.3 lbs
ADY (1.18518%):    2.94 g | 0.1 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.78 tsp | 0.26 tbsp
Salt (.875%):    2.17 g | 0.08 oz | 0 lbs | 0.39 tsp | 0.13 tbsp
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (4.27199%):    10.59 g | 0.37 oz | 0.02 lbs | 2.33 tsp | 0.78 tbsp
Dry Non-Fat Milk (2.35155%):    5.83 g | 0.21 oz | 0.01 lbs | 4.06 tsp | 1.35 tbsp
Total (164.23872%):   407.3 g | 14.37 oz | 0.9 lbs | TF = 0.14291
Single Ball:   203.65 g | 7.18 oz | 0.45 lbs

That is a little more than 1/3 the size of the OP.   ;)
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Chicago Bob on January 12, 2013, 05:11:35 PM
If the Dough Doctor says that anything under 5% dry milk addition will not make any difference in the dough why do I see small amounts being used on many forum recipes?
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: slybarman on January 13, 2013, 06:43:57 PM
100% improvement tonight. Pete - your bakers %s for the dough calculator really saved the day.

Crust thickness was right on and taste and texture were right on too.

Thanks guys. the kiddies were happy.

The reason the cheese looks funny on the pepperoni pie is because I ran out of cheese and had to cut up some of the kids cheese stick to finish it off.  :-[
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Chicago Bob on January 13, 2013, 07:45:42 PM
Looks great Steve. Must be whole milk "cheese stick". Shred and blend both types together and I'll bet you'd be pretty close to PH cheese... ;)
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: slybarman on January 13, 2013, 07:56:43 PM
Ha - I need to get off my butt and get back up to the restaurant supply house for a big bag of decent cheese.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on January 14, 2013, 07:47:12 AM
If the Dough Doctor says that anything under 5% dry milk addition will not make any difference in the dough why do I see small amounts being used on many forum recipes?

Bob,

That is a very good question.

According to what Tom has said, there is some dough strengthening effect even when using below 5% dry milk. That might help if the dough is to be run through a sheeter or roller of some sort but I tend not to think that that is why some pizza operators use dry milk. I think that a lot of pizza operators just decided to add some milk to their dough, simply because they had it or maybe to satisfy their curiosity. They perhaps liked the results, or perceived such, and just decided to continue to use it and the recipe eventually became a family or legendary recipe to be handed down from generation to generation and guarded like it was Fort Knox. It might have also been used as a differentiating factor. For example, for years, Donatos boasted about the health effects of the milk in their dough (and eggs as well). They no longer do that. At Vito & Nick's in the Chicago area, milk (fresh milk) is a hallmark ingredient for their dough for their famous Chicago thin-crust pizza. I don't think they would ever dare to leave the milk out of their dough. Their customers would be picketing the joint. I might add that V&N uses a roller for their skins so the milk (at around 12% of the flour weight by my calculation) may have a beneficial effect for that purpose.

In Pizza Hut's case, I do not believe that they ever used dry milk alone, or at least I could never find any evidence of it. As I noted at Reply 1 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8791.msg76201/topicseen.html#msg76201, (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,8791.msg76201/topicseen.html#msg76201,) I believe that PH was using a dairy blend. The pdf link in Reply 1 is no longer active but you can see a typical PH dough formulation using the dairy blend for its pan dough at page 4 of the pdf document at http://www.espanol.pizzahut.com/menu/nutritioninfo/documents/ph_ingredients.pdf. (http://www.espanol.pizzahut.com/menu/nutritioninfo/documents/ph_ingredients.pdf.) That is an old document but represented what PH was doing before it went to frozen dough for most of its pizzas (in the U.S.). Later, it appears that they abandoned the dairy blend but continued to use whey, as can be seen in this 2008 pdf document: http://www.pizzahut.com/files/pdf/pizza%20hut%20ingredient%20statements%20september%202008.pdf. (http://www.pizzahut.com/files/pdf/pizza%20hut%20ingredient%20statements%20september%202008.pdf.) That document is after PH went to frozen dough. Pizza Hut has stopped publishing pdf documents for its ingredients so it is hard to say exactly what they are now using in their doughs. Since their current doughs are loaded with chemicals, that is perhaps no great loss.

If Steve (slybarman) would like to replicate the "old" and, arguably, "better" PH pan dough, without all the chemicals. he might consider using a dairy blend.  Dutch Valley uses to sell it but I could not find it among the products at its website this morning. But I found another source: http://www.roundeyesupply.com/Land-O-Lakes-Superheat-All-Dairy-Blend-p/de127782.htm. (http://www.roundeyesupply.com/Land-O-Lakes-Superheat-All-Dairy-Blend-p/de127782.htm.) Or Steve can make his own dairy blend using the same ingredients. His kids will thank him for the added nutrition.

Peter

EDIT (4/20/13): For the Wayback Machine link to the above Pizza Hut pdf document, see http://web.archive.org/web/20100602083641/http://www.pizzahut.com/Files/PDF/PIZZA%20HUT%20INGREDIENT%20STATEMENTS%20September%202008.pdf (http://web.archive.org/web/20100602083641/http://www.pizzahut.com/Files/PDF/PIZZA%20HUT%20INGREDIENT%20STATEMENTS%20September%202008.pdf)

EDIT (12/30/2015): For an alternative link to a dairy blend, see http://www.roundeyesupply.com/Land-O-Lakes-Superheat-All-Dairy-Blend-p/de127782.htm. (http://www.roundeyesupply.com/Land-O-Lakes-Superheat-All-Dairy-Blend-p/de127782.htm.)
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Chicago Bob on January 14, 2013, 09:07:09 AM
Thanks Peter.
I do use about 11% milk(liquid 2%)in my Chicago thins and around 5%(dry powdered) in cracker crusts. I "perceive" a difference and like using it in my doughs. Maybe Steve will try it and tell us what he thinks....
Bob
Title: Re: Re: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: slybarman on January 14, 2013, 09:40:05 AM
Steve can make his own dairy blend using the same ingredients. His kids will than him for the added nutrition.

My kids eat their boogers. I think it fairly unlikely they will thank me over nutrition.  ;D
Title: Re: Re: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on January 14, 2013, 10:05:50 AM
My kids eat their boogers.
Steve,

That subject matter is more appropriately placed in the Off-Topics Food board ;D.

Peter
Title: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: slybarman on January 14, 2013, 02:32:30 PM
Steve,

That subject matter is more appropriately placed in the Off-Topics Food board ;D.

Peter

Quite right. Touché Peter.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pizzamaster on January 16, 2013, 04:55:44 AM
If the Dough Doctor says that anything under 5% dry milk addition will not make any difference in the dough why do I see small amounts being used on many forum recipes?

Just because something was published in a book doesn't mean it it's better or gospel.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Chicago Bob on January 16, 2013, 10:04:25 AM
Just because something was published in a book doesn't mean it it's better or gospel.
What the  ???
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pizzamaster on January 16, 2013, 04:04:51 PM
What the what lol? You're saying everything your grandma or mom or whomever made when you were a kid came out of a book? That everything you make is prepared by someone else's standard? There is no one right way to do things is all I said. If someone likes more or less of something and it works for them that doesn't mean it's wrong.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Chicago Bob on January 16, 2013, 08:27:07 PM
What the what lol? You're saying everything your grandma or mom or whomever made when you were a kid came out of a book? That everything you make is prepared by someone else's standard? There is no one right way to do things is all I said. If someone likes more or less of something and it works for them that doesn't mean it's wrong.
Actually, I was questioning what was written. And I didn't read it in a book, Peter linked to something said at PMQ by our very own Tom Lehmann "The Dough Doctor" http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,213.msg231564.html#msg231564

But it's all good Pizzamaster... ;)
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: pythonic on June 12, 2013, 08:17:24 PM
This is my first attempt at making a Pizza Hut pan pizza clone. I generally make New York-style pizzas but my family loves Pizza Hut. The recipe I used for this was the 22 ounce scaled version that Pete-zza calculated in another thread (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4607.msg38909.html#msg38909). My directions are as follows:

The yeast was added to the water and allowed to activate and dissolve for 10 minutes. Next, I mixed in the salt, sugar, and dry non-fat milk. This combination was poured into a KitchenAid mixer followed by flour and vegetable oil. After a 10 minute kneed using the hook attachment, I let the dough rest, covered, inside the mixing bowl for 10 minutes before rolling it out into a 12-inch circle. The dough was then placed into a Chicago Metallic Non Stick 14-Inch Deep Dish Pizza Pan (http://www.amazon.com/Chicago-Metallic-Stick-14-Inch-Pizza/dp/B003YKGS4A/?tag=pizzamaking-20) (epicalien recommended this pan earlier in this thread) with 4 ounces of vegetable oil placed in the bottom. The top was covered using plastic wrap and the dough was proofed for 1 hour. Afterwards, I placed the dough into the refrigerator for approximately 12 hours. It was removed 2 hours before baking.

I preheated the oven to 500F with a FibraMent stone placed on the middle rack. Before topping, I slightly depressed the middle of the dough, leaving a 1 inch edge-crust. The pizza was topped with Jackie Tran's sauce recipe (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4452.msg92245.html#msg92245), which was a near-perfect imitation of Pizza Hut's. I used 2 cups of low moisture part skim mozzarella (though I saw an ex-Pizza Hut employee say that they used 3 cups on their large pan pizzas, 4.5 if it's a cheese pizza). Half of the cheese was put on top of the sauce, followed by diced onions and green peppers, then the other half of the cheese. I finished topping it with pepperonis. Before going into the oven, I sprayed the edge crust with a vegetable oil cooking spray. The pizza was baked for 12 minutes on the stone.

The pizza turned out great and it will be a recipe that I try again in the future. Thanks to everyone who put in effort on cloning this!

Peter.

I want to make this one but ferment time is only 12hrs.  I want to do a 24hr cold ferment instead.  How should I adjust the yeast?
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on June 13, 2013, 12:05:04 PM
I want to make this one but ferment time is only 12hrs.  I want to do a 24hr cold ferment instead.  How should I adjust the yeast?
Nate,

The answer depends on whether you make your dough in the same way and under the same conditions as xsosx did. While we know how xsosx made and managed the dough for his pizza, we don't know at what temperature the dough fermented. We can only assume that his dough went from room temperature into a refrigerator that might have been at around 40 degrees F. If you make and manage your dough exactly like xsosx did and your refrigerator temperature is around 40 degrees F, I would simply cut the amount of ADY in half, to reflect your longer fermentation window. If your refrigerator temperature runs higher or lower than normal, you will have to tweak the amount of ADY in one direction or the other to compensate.

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: pythonic on June 13, 2013, 08:22:37 PM
Nate,

The answer depends on whether you make your dough in the same way and under the same conditions as xsosx did. While we know how xsosx made and managed the dough for his pizza, we don't know at what temperature the dough fermented. We can only assume that his dough went from room temperature into a refrigerator that might have been at around 40 degrees F. If you make and manage your dough exactly like xsosx did and your refrigerator temperature is around 40 degrees F, I would simply cut the amount of ADY in half, to reflect your longer fermentation window. If your refrigerator temperature runs higher or lower than normal, you will have to tweak the amount of ADY in one direction or the other to compensate.

Peter

Ok thanks.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: pythonic on June 15, 2013, 03:38:26 PM
Peter.



Peter,

I want to make a 12' pie using the pan below.  Is your recipe for a 12' or 14'?  I also forgot to mention I will be using IDY instead.  How does that change my yeast amount for a 24hr ferment?

Nate
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on June 15, 2013, 03:53:46 PM
I want to make a 12' pie using the pan below.  Is your recipe for a 12' or 14'?  I also forgot to mention I will be using IDY instead.  How does that change my yeast amount for a 24hr ferment?
Nate,

The recipe you referenced is for a 14" pan. For the 12" pan, you perhaps want to use the recipe as recited at Reply 12 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4607.msg62351.html#msg62351 (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4607.msg62351.html#msg62351). The amount of yeast (ADY) for the 12" pan recipe is 1.18518%. That converts to about 0.90% IDY. So long as you make and manage the dough like xsosx did, and assuming roughly the same temperatures, I would cut the 0.90% figure in half, or 0.45% IDY.

Please let us know how things work out with those changes.

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: pythonic on June 15, 2013, 04:24:33 PM
Thanks again Peter.  I'm making this on Tues so I will be sure to post pics.

Nate
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: pythonic on June 16, 2013, 09:51:24 PM
Peter,

Do u think this aluminum American metal craft or my dark Chicago metallic pan will produce the best results?  I want to also make a test pizza in a 9in pan.  I saw in another thread u referenced that a 14in was 22oz, 12in was 16oz.  Am I to assume that a 9in would be 9-10oz?

Nate
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on June 17, 2013, 07:40:23 AM
Do u think this aluminum American metal craft or my dark Chicago metallic pan will produce the best results?  I want to also make a test pizza in a 9in pan.  I saw in another thread u referenced that a 14in was 22oz, 12in was 16oz.  Am I to assume that a 9in would be 9-10oz?
Nate,

The dark seasoned pan should be the better choice. You can see an example of a PH seasoned pan on eBay at http://www.ebay.com/itm/DEEP-DISH-PIZZA-HUT-PIZZA-PAN-WELL-SEASONED-PERSONAL-PAN-SIZE-KALON-NON-STICK/400477052432?rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.m1851&_trkparms=aid%3D222002%26algo%3DSIC.FIT%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D163%26meid%3D8439300468944658341%26pid%3D100005%26prg%3D1088%26rk%3D1%26sd%3D150992570474%26#ht_2203wt_1083 (http://www.ebay.com/itm/DEEP-DISH-PIZZA-HUT-PIZZA-PAN-WELL-SEASONED-PERSONAL-PAN-SIZE-KALON-NON-STICK/400477052432?rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.m1851&_trkparms=aid%3D222002%26algo%3DSIC.FIT%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D163%26meid%3D8439300468944658341%26pid%3D100005%26prg%3D1088%26rk%3D1%26sd%3D150992570474%26#ht_2203wt_1083). If you do a search on eBay for PH pans, you will see several more exampes.

To make a 9" pizza gets to be tricky because the size of the dough piece is smaller than the size of the pan. This issue was discussed at Reply 136 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,213.msg84113.html#msg84113 (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,213.msg84113.html#msg84113). If you read Reply 136 and the following posts up to and including Reply 140, you will see how to modify the original dough formulation for the 9" pan. You will have to use the thickness factor approach.

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: pythonic on June 17, 2013, 07:58:36 AM
I ended up going with 9.5oz and it definitely wasnt enough because my patty was only 1/4in thick.  I read u want 1/2 to 3/4.  Also it took 5hrs to rise enough to touch the sides of the pan.  I'm gonna bake this tonight and probably up yeast to .90%.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: pythonic on June 17, 2013, 10:25:04 PM
Here is my first attempt.  I over baked it by 3 mins I think because the bottom was alot darker than the sides.  I was going for more color on the crust.  15 min.   Over sauced it as well. 
Also it was only half the thickness of what it's supposed to be since I came up short on the recipe and yeast.  Live and learn.

Nate
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Chicago Bob on June 18, 2013, 10:08:21 AM
I would hit that like a madman...nevah too much sauce for Bob!  :drool:
I sure hope you do this again Nate, you should be able to dial 'er in now mate.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: pythonic on June 18, 2013, 06:31:31 PM
I would hit that like a madman...nevah too much sauce for Bob!  :drool:
I sure hope you do this again Nate, you should be able to dial 'er in now mate.

Bob,

I would put this pizza in the category of "looked better than it tasted".  I gave it a 3 out of 10.  Needs lots of work. 
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: gonella on June 22, 2013, 05:21:39 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hi9oY8ifLTA&amp;feature=youtube_gdata_player
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: grathan on June 23, 2013, 10:12:00 AM
Had pizza hut last night.
Proofing in swaths of oil is definitely key. Also some type of no-knead dough.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Chicago Bob on June 23, 2013, 11:20:18 AM
Had pizza hut last night.
Proofing in swaths of oil is definitely key. Also some type of no-knead dough.
What do you mean by that Mike; thanks.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on June 23, 2013, 06:42:41 PM
I doubt that there is any no-knead dough involved. PH went to frozen dough for its pan pizzas many years ago. The only places I am aware of that use fresh dough are PH stores outside of the U.S. and Canada.

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: pythonic on June 24, 2013, 12:53:37 PM
What do you mean by that Mike; thanks.

He means letting the dough soak up that oil for some hours is key to getting that texture right.  I agree.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: grathan on June 29, 2013, 09:36:50 AM
I doubt that there is any no-knead dough involved. PH went to frozen dough for its pan pizzas many years ago. The only places I am aware of that use fresh dough are PH stores outside of the U.S. and Canada.

Peter

The texture to me seems to have a structure similar to no-knead. I worked at one when I was a teenager some 20 years ago. The frozen puck was perhaps 1/10th the size of a finished pie. It was kneaded perhaps, but I am thinking not just to keep the size down for shipping, though perhaps it could be compressed after kneading.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: nyquilnu on August 31, 2013, 11:42:00 PM
My first attempt at this also my first picture post on pizzamaking.  ::) Thanks to xPHmgr, Pete-zza and Jackie Tran.  :pizza:

Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Morgan on September 21, 2013, 11:50:44 AM
Here is a version of "pizza hut origial pan pizza" that I came across. Don't ask how I got it or else I'd have to kill ya >:D  I don't know if this is anything close to what you pizza hutters are making or using, so I can't vouch for it's authenticity. I haven't tried it.

Pizza Hut Original Pan Pizza                       


                   1 1/3 cups  Warm water (105F)
                      1/4 cup  Non-fat dry milk
                     1/2 teas. Salt
                       4 cups  Flour
                      1 Tbls.  Sugar
                        1 pk.  Dry yeast
                      2 Tbls.  Vegetable oil (for dough)
                        9 Oz.  Vegetable oil (3 oz. per pan)
                               Butter flavored Pam

   Put yeast, sugar, salt, and dry milk in a large (2 qt.) bowl. Add
   water and stir to mix well. Allow to sit for two minutes. Add oil
   and stir again. Add flour and stir until dough forms and flour is
   absorbed. Turn out on to a flat surface and knead for about 10 minutes.

   Divide dough into three balls. In three 9" cake pans, put 3 Oz. of
   oil in each making sure it is spread evenly. Using a rolling pin,
   roll out each dough ball to about a 9" circle. Place in cake pans.
   Spray the outter edge of dough with Pam. Cover with a plate. Place
   in warm area and allow to rise for 1 to 1 1/2 hours.

            Sauce:
                1 8 Ounce Can Tomato Sauce
                1 Teaspoon Dry Oregano
              1/2 Teaspoon Marjoram
              1/2 Teaspoon Dry Basil
              1/2 Teaspoon Garlic salt

   Combine and let sit for 1 hour.

      For Each Nine Inch Pizza:

      1. Preheat oven to 475F
      2. Spoon 1/3 cup sauce on dough and spread to within 1" of edge.
      3. Distribute 1 1/2 Oz. shredded mozzarella cheese on sauce.
      4. Place toppings of your choice in this order:
         Pepperoni or Ham
         Vegetables
         Meats (cooked ground sausage or beef)
      5. Top with 3 Oz. mozzarella cheese
      6. Cook until cheese is bubbling and outer crust is brown.
      7. Cut in six slices.

Im going to test this dough today. Post some pics if it tunrs out good enough!
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Morgan on September 29, 2013, 04:55:31 PM
This was good and my first pizzahut clone, but definitely not last!
Title: Why was my dough still raw on the inside?
Post by: goku on October 15, 2013, 10:30:31 PM
Hello...

I followed the recipe to the T but my dough turned out to be raw on the inside. Does anyone know why?
Title: Re: Why was my dough still raw on the inside?
Post by: Morgan on December 11, 2013, 05:27:34 AM
Hello...

I followed the recipe to the T but my dough turned out to be raw on the inside. Does anyone know why?

I guess you just took it out too early.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: getchai on February 27, 2014, 09:45:52 PM
Wow! Great recipe and comments. I created a custom size using the dough calculator and Pete-zza's (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4607.msg38909.html#msg38909) percentages. The dough sat in the fridge overnight and then in the pan for an hour prior to cooking. I used Jackie Tran's sauce recipe (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4452.msg92245.html#msg92245) which I also let sit overnight. The cheese was 100% mozzarella cheese. It was cooked in a deep dish pan on a preheated stone at 475. I put ~1oz of olive oil at the bottom of the pan. It tasted like pizza hut! There is no kosher pizza hut here in MA so I am extra excited to be able to eat it again.  :drool:
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: dmckean44 on February 27, 2014, 10:16:56 PM
I'm curious, has anyone cloned pizza hut sausage?
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Chicago Bob on February 27, 2014, 10:17:01 PM
Wow! Great recipe and comments. I created a custom size using the dough calculator and Pete-zza's (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4607.msg38909.html#msg38909) percentages. The dough sat in the fridge overnight and then in the pan for an hour prior to cooking. I used Jackie Tran's sauce recipe (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4452.msg92245.html#msg92245) which I also let sit overnight. The cheese was 100% mozzarella cheese. It was cooked in a deep dish pan on a preheated stone at 475. I put ~1oz of olive oil at the bottom of the pan. It tasted like pizza hut! There is no kosher pizza hut here in MA so I am extra excited to be able to eat it again.  :drool:
Good looking pizza...bottom is spot on from where I sit. Might want to try different mozz cheeses....was this one a "low moisture" or "part skim" getchai?   Nice work.  :chef:

Bob
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Chicago Bob on February 27, 2014, 10:21:48 PM
I'm curious, has anyone cloned pizza hut sausage?
Have they come out with something that might be a "fresh" sausage? Otherwise, the old school pork or beef "topping" is a highly processed nugget, pellet, rabbit....you get the idea. Hormel sells sausage "crumbles". They're pretty close.

Bob
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: getchai on February 27, 2014, 10:57:47 PM
Good looking pizza...bottom is spot on from where I sit. Might want to try different mozz cheeses....was this one a "low moisture" or "part skim" getchai?   Nice work.  :chef:

Bob

Thanks Bob! Yea, this cheese is labeled both "low mositure, part skim" - Yea I have been sticking with this one for a while but I should get back to experimenting with the cheese.  ^^^
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Chicago Bob on February 27, 2014, 11:04:55 PM
Thanks Bob! Yea, this cheese is labeled both "low mositure, part skim" - Yea I have been sticking with this one for a while but I should get back to experimenting with the cheese.  ^^^
If you haven't already....might try to give Walmart, Sorrento, Polly-O whole milk 1lb. blocks a roll. Fairly inexpensive and give good results for what you are working there. You're doing good man...please keep the pics coming!  :chef:

Bob
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Morgan on May 02, 2014, 08:10:11 AM
Help me out guys! How much dough should i use for 13" pie ? What is the right thickness for pizzahut clone ?
Its been to long from my last pizzahut clone :pizza:
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on May 02, 2014, 04:28:37 PM
Morgan,

You might want to use the methodology set forth in Reply 140 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=213.msg84184#msg84184 (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=213.msg84184#msg84184) . You should use the thickness factor set forth in the last sentence of Reply 140.

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Morgan on May 03, 2014, 02:23:50 AM
Morgan,

You might want to use the methodology set forth in Reply 140 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=213.msg84184#msg84184 (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=213.msg84184#msg84184) . You should use the thickness factor set forth in the last line of Reply 140.

Peter

Thanks Pete! I tought i used enough dough, but boy was i wrong again. I used 500gr dough for 13" and it should be 900gr according to the calculator using 0.242 thickness factor, well next time.

This is from yesterday, 500gr dough/13", it was good, but i wanted thicker crust.

Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Morgan on May 03, 2014, 02:28:39 AM
I think i got something wrong with the calculator, it cant be 900gr for 13" pie since you have allready converted to bakers prosent and it was 634gr/14" pie. I guess i wasnt so off with the 500gr/13", using thickness factor 0.142 dough should be 534gr.

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4607.msg38909.html#msg38909 (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4607.msg38909.html#msg38909)
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on May 03, 2014, 11:02:47 AM
Morgan,

You can double-check my numbers, but using the thickness factor 0.14291 for a 13" pizza, this is what I get using the expanded dough calculating tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/expanded_calculator.html (http://www.pizzamaking.com/expanded_calculator.html):

Flour (100%):
Water (55.555%):
ADY (1.18518%):
Salt (0.875%):
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (4.27199%):
Sugar (1.875%):
Dry Non-Fat Milk (2.35155%):
Total (166.11372%):
323.73 g  |  11.42 oz | 0.71 lbs
179.85 g  |  6.34 oz | 0.4 lbs
3.84 g | 0.14 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.02 tsp | 0.34 tbsp
2.83 g | 0.1 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.51 tsp | 0.17 tbsp
13.83 g | 0.49 oz | 0.03 lbs | 3.05 tsp | 1.02 tbsp
6.07 g | 0.21 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.52 tsp | 0.51 tbsp
7.61 g | 0.27 oz | 0.02 lbs | 5.3 tsp | 1.77 tbsp
537.76 g | 18.97 oz | 1.19 lbs | TF = 0.14291
Note: Dough is for a 13" pizza; thickness factor = 0.14291; no bowl residue compensation

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Morgan on May 03, 2014, 11:39:22 AM
Morgan,

You can double-check my numbers, but using the thickness factor 0.14291 for a 13" pizza, this is what I get using the expanded dough calculating tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/expanded_calculator.html (http://www.pizzamaking.com/expanded_calculator.html):

Flour (100%):
Water (55.555%):
ADY (1.18518%):
Salt (0.875%):
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (4.27199%):
Sugar (1.875%):
Dry Non-Fat Milk (2.35155%):
Total (166.11372%):
323.73 g  |  11.42 oz | 0.71 lbs
179.85 g  |  6.34 oz | 0.4 lbs
3.84 g | 0.14 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.02 tsp | 0.34 tbsp
2.83 g | 0.1 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.51 tsp | 0.17 tbsp
13.83 g | 0.49 oz | 0.03 lbs | 3.05 tsp | 1.02 tbsp
6.07 g | 0.21 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.52 tsp | 0.51 tbsp
7.61 g | 0.27 oz | 0.02 lbs | 5.3 tsp | 1.77 tbsp
537.76 g | 18.97 oz | 1.19 lbs | TF = 0.14291
Note: Dough is for a 13" pizza; thickness factor = 0.14291; no bowl residue compensation

Peter

This is right, i got the same total. I used thickness factor 0.242 at first, is the 0.142 right for pizzahut panpizza. I dont remember where i took that 0.242 ??? Just finished the other half, was even better than yesterday. I used 500gr/13" so it was very close to a 0.142.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on May 03, 2014, 01:44:54 PM
Morgan,

You can see how I arrived at the lower thickness factor value at Reply 6 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=4607.msg38909#msg38909 (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=4607.msg38909#msg38909) .

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Morgan on May 03, 2014, 02:13:06 PM
Morgan,

You can see how I arrived at the lower thickness factor value at Reply 6 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=4607.msg38909#msg38909 (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=4607.msg38909#msg38909) .

Peter

Thank you Pete! I have read this whole topic, but i just cant remember everything.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Morgan on May 04, 2014, 04:27:44 AM
Same dough, but coldfermented 24h. Pepperoni, salami and some paprika on top.

Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Chicago Bob on May 04, 2014, 01:47:32 PM
That second pic is a very nice photo.  :chef:

CB
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Morgan on May 04, 2014, 01:51:53 PM
Thanks Bob :) I hope that the pie also looks at least somewhat good even if it isn't perfect :chef:
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: wahoo88 on May 04, 2014, 03:25:13 PM
Morgan, is that paprika the pepper they grind the spice from?  In the US, I've only heard of paprika as referring to the spice, not the fresh pepper itself. Interesting.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Morgan on May 04, 2014, 03:34:15 PM
Morgan, is that paprika the pepper they grind the spice from?  In the US, I've only heard of paprika as referring to the spice, not the fresh pepper itself. Interesting.

Yes its fresh paprika. Didnt know that in the US fresh paprika is called pepper, you allways learn something in here.
Here fresh paprika is paprika and dried is just paprika powder.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Jakew81 on July 13, 2014, 01:17:51 PM
Thanks to everyone posting here I have made my first successful pan pizzas!  I have been lurking on here for a couple of weeks and the discussion here has made the difference between a recipe and a good recipe!
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Chicago Bob on July 13, 2014, 04:05:59 PM
Thanks to everyone posting here I have made my first successful pan pizzas!  I have been lurking on here for a couple of weeks and the discussion here has made the difference between a recipe and a good recipe!
they look great jake!   :chef:
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Morgan on July 14, 2014, 05:56:40 PM
Definitely looking fatilicius.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Jakew81 on August 10, 2014, 08:46:59 PM
Bob and Morgan
Thanks for the encouragement.  As this was the first pizza recipe on the forum I had any real success with, and with my new found understanding of the expanded dough calculator and bakers percents, I have chosen this pizza recipe to test my understanding of the dough calculator.  Based on Peter's formulation found here http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=4607.msg38909#msg38909 (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=4607.msg38909#msg38909) , I used the calculator to find out the thickness factor for a 14" pie scaled down to 22 ounces.  It is 0.142857 TF.  Knowing that I found out that the numbers for a 13x9 pan are about the same as 12.2 round pan in total area and dough ball formulation.  Bob confirmed for me last night that the weight in ounces divided by the area in square inches equals thickness factor, and with thickness factor set, I can figure out total area in square inches of all the different sized dough balls I want to make, and make dough for several sized pies at once.  Tonight I made a 14" in a cast iron on a preheated stone. This works if the dough is not refrigerated in the pan and the stone is at one above the lowest rack in my oven.  At the middle rack in aluminum cake pans, I also made a 13x9", 12", and  9" pizza's,  and a 6" "Hershey's chocolate dunkers", all from one massive dough ball made is my bread machine.  I cut and weighed to specific weights based on calculations made with the expanded dough calculator.  I have come a long way in a couple of months.  I shared with the neighbors and they "want the recipe".  Having made this a few times, in different ways,  I have found the refrigeration of this dough is really not necessary, if the dough is allowed to rise in the pans for about an hour or so.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Chicago Bob on August 10, 2014, 09:02:09 PM
You are doing really good Jake and your pizzas sure do show it.  :chef:

Tell me, did you put oil in those pans before placing in your dough?
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Jakew81 on August 10, 2014, 09:07:43 PM
Bob
Thank you.  I did oil the pans but, not nearly as much as I have in the past.  I feel they needed more oil than I have put in this time, as they were not nearly as crispy and pizza hut-y as I have made in the past.  Other than that, the crumb was spot on.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Chicago Bob on August 10, 2014, 09:17:54 PM
Bob
Thank you.  I did oil the pans but, not nearly as much as I have in the past.  I feel they needed more oil than I have put in this time, as they were not nearly as crispy and pizza hut-y as I have made in the past.  Other than that, the crumb was spot on.
That`s what I observed.

Here`s a guy that uses 6oz. of pan and rim oil....I know I`ve seen others using like around 3oz`s and more.   http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=28134.msg284226#msg284226 (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=28134.msg284226#msg284226)
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Jakew81 on August 10, 2014, 09:20:58 PM
Thanks Bob,
Agreed much more oil next time and I think it will be perfect!
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Slayter on January 24, 2015, 08:17:34 PM
Thank you, thank you , thank you!!!!!

I love the pan pizzas from PH and this crust turned out awesome, to my tastes anyway. I did use Pete-zza's PJ sauce because we also made one of his. This crust rocks and I look forward to many a pizza night in the future.

Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Chicago Bob on January 24, 2015, 08:20:16 PM


   Tasty looking pizza slayter...congrats!   :chef:
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Slayter on January 24, 2015, 08:56:34 PM
Thanks, Bob!

Only the third pizza I've ever made. Made two last week, had to put the baking stone through a self-clean in the oven thanks to my goof-ups, came here through Google looking for tips on getting the skin off the peel, and next thing I know . . . BAM! I've made two more pizzas, with radically different crusts (PH pan & PJ style) and both turned out well. The wifey looooooves this PH pan style crust. Many thanks to all the masterminds behind this forum.

Oh, and the PJ crust slide right off the peel onto the stone like I'd done it all my life.  :D
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on January 24, 2015, 09:00:15 PM
Slater,

It looks like you aced it, especially for a newbie. Can you tell us which specific recipe you used?

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Slayter on January 24, 2015, 09:18:31 PM
Slater,

It looks like you aced it, especially for a newbie. Can you tell us which specific recipe you used?

Peter

 :-[ :-[ Thanks, Peter!

I used the recipe from post #1 (http://www.pizzamaking.com/panpizza.php). I do not have a stand mixer, although I keep hinting at the wife for one.  :P So, I used my trusty danish dough hook to combine the ingredients and then hand kneaded it for ten minutes. With this particular dough that is some serious work!  :o  I poured 4oz of vegetable oil (soybean) into a 15" pan. Rolled out the dough to about 14", put it in the pan, covered with a cutting board, let it sit out for about 2 hours, and stuck it in the fridge for almost 24 hours.

The cheese was a blend of whole milk mozzarella (6oz.) and and low-moisture mozzarella (3oz.) as listed in your PJ clone thread. The sauce was similar to your PJ clone sauce, but I used Cento brand crushed tomatoes instead of the GV brand. I did not need to drain any moisture from them so I adjusted the ingredients per the percentages listed for your sauce. Let it marinate in the fridge for almost 24 hours. I would have preferred a less sweet sauce on this particular pie, but the wife loved it so that's what we'll use.  ;D I also placed the pepperonis between paper towels to get some of the grease out. Another tip from  your PJ clone thread.

I allowed the baking stone to heat up @ 500F on the bottom rack of a convection oven for an hour before pulling the dough from the fridge, dressing it with help from the kids,  and placing it on the stone. Cooked for 14 minutes and viola!    :pizza:

Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on January 24, 2015, 09:33:42 PM
Slayter,

Sometime you might want to take a look at the modified PH recipe as set forth at Reply 6 at:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4607.msg38909.html#msg38909

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Slayter on January 24, 2015, 09:45:10 PM
Peter,

That's awesome! I thought it was a little thick, even though I was using a 15" pan instead of a 14". I will definitely scale it back next time.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on January 25, 2015, 12:34:24 PM
Slayter,

This is supposed to be a good clone of the PH sauce:

Reply 7 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=4452.msg92245#msg92245 (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=4452.msg92245#msg92245)

You might also note some of the posts that follow to put cloning of pizza sauces into perspective.

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: wise1 on January 29, 2015, 11:13:40 PM
I bought several pizza hut pans at a rummage for $1 a piece a couple years ago. Including 2 large pan, and 3 personal mini pans. I made a crust like that and found out that you're actually frying the crust. The oil or whatever is what gives it that great taste as it soaks in. The recipe I used put it in the fridge also. I bet a little melted but might make it taste good also.. I think their round pans also gives it the heat it needs to cook the crust around the edges.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: mbrulato on January 30, 2015, 07:29:08 AM
Glad to see this thread has been resurrected.  This recipe in post #1, was the very first recipe I used when joining the forum back in August 2013.  Just yesterday, I was thinking of making this again for my little girl who loves this pizza style.

The recipe is spot on but the only thing I remember not liking was the taste of the vegetable oil in the bottom of the pan.  I'm ok with the amount of oil in order to achieve that "fried" texture, but feel like taste is lacking here.

If you had to choose an alternative oil for the bottom, which would it be? EVOO? Avocado? Or Corn oil?
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: jsaras on January 30, 2015, 10:07:04 AM
Avocado isn't big on flavor. It's analogous to unsalted butter.  Peanut oil can have a lightly nutty flavor, and it's generally believed NOT to be an allergen.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: mbrulato on January 30, 2015, 12:06:08 PM
Avocado isn't big on flavor. It's analogous to unsalted butter.  Peanut oil can have a lightly nutty flavor, and it's generally believed NOT to be an allergen.

Oh, I forgot about peanut oil.  No allergens in my house.  Do you think peanut oil would taste better than corn oil, Jonas?
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: MrH on January 30, 2015, 09:10:11 PM
Thank you, thank you , thank you!!!!!

I love the pan pizzas from PH and this crust turned out awesome, to my tastes anyway. I did use Pete-zza's PJ sauce because we also made one of his. This crust rocks and I look forward to many a pizza night in the future.

Your cheese even looks like theirs. On looks alone I'd believe it was the real deal.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: wise1 on February 05, 2015, 11:31:31 PM
Sorry, I meant to say butter in my previous post.. I think a butter flavoring oil like they use in popcorn would taste good when it's put in the bottom of the pan.. There is a pdf file floating around on the internet somewhere that has some of pizza hut's clone recipes.. Used to think just the crust was important in a pizza but am changing my mind to think other things are just as important. Like the type of sauce and toppings. But mostly the crust and the sauce..
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: The Lord Of The Pizza on March 20, 2015, 02:42:52 PM
Definitely have to try this!

What type of cheese would you guys recommend for duplicating an old school Pizza Hut Pan Pizza?

Also, any specific pan I should acquire? 
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: The Lord Of The Pizza on March 20, 2015, 02:46:06 PM
Also, should this be cold fermented at a minimum of 24 hours? 
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Brewman on March 28, 2015, 09:58:06 PM
Cooked the Pizza Hut pan clone in post 1. This pie came out great and tasted just like PH pan pizza. The crust was too thick and the bottom was a bit overdone but this pie tasted great. Only let the dough rise 2 hours and used KA AP flour. Wil cook this again next weekend scaling the dough down for a 13 inch pan, let rise overnight and move the stone up one rack. Also, I used canola instead of vegetable oil. Does the oil type make a difference?
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on March 29, 2015, 08:54:04 AM
Brewman,

Which recipe did you use?

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Brewman on March 29, 2015, 11:13:01 AM
Used xPHmgr's recipe from post 1 in this thread.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on March 29, 2015, 12:16:45 PM
Used xPHmgr's recipe from post 1 in this thread.
Brewman,

You might take a look at the scaled down version at Reply 6 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4607.msg38909.html#msg38909 (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4607.msg38909.html#msg38909). You might be able to further scale it down your pan size, using the thickness factor 0.14291 in the expanded dough calculating tool at http://www.pizzamaking.com/expanded-calculator.html (http://www.pizzamaking.com/expanded-calculator.html).

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: pythonic on July 23, 2015, 07:44:24 PM
Made this tonight.  Everything was spot on Pizza Hut however the vegetable oil I used (Kroger) gave the bottom a bad taste.  Other than that I thought I was eating the original Pizza Hut pan pizza from the 80s.  I altered Peter's recipe below and I believe it did the trick.  I used all trumps high gluten flour with 57% hydration and 6% oil.  I did a 6hr room temp rise followed by a 60 minute proof in my oiled pan.  Pizza was baked at 450F on a 500F preheated stone for 15 mins then the pan was moved under the broiler for 2-3 mins to finish off the top.  It was magical.  You must try it.

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4607.msg38909.html#msg38909
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on July 23, 2015, 07:52:02 PM
Nate,

Thanks for writing up your attempt at a PH clone pizza. That way I can reference your posts when other members inquire about that particular style of pizza.

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: MrH on August 11, 2015, 09:24:40 PM
Thank you, thank you , thank you!!!!!

I love the pan pizzas from PH and this crust turned out awesome, to my tastes anyway. I did use Pete-zza's PJ sauce because we also made one of his. This crust rocks and I look forward to many a pizza night in the future.

Oops just noticed I already commented on this, I really need to try it out.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Wormtail on September 01, 2015, 08:21:22 PM
This recipe sounds so good.... do you think I could bake it in a cast iron skillet? I was thinking 450-475 degrees for around 15-17 minutes.

Mike
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Wormtail on September 03, 2015, 08:58:17 PM
I just made my 1st PH pan pizza clone and it was amazing.... and delicious!!! Baked in a cast iron skillet at 450 degrees for 15 minutes.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: PizzaManic on September 28, 2015, 03:57:14 AM
Hi Pizza Lovers  ;D

This week I'm attending a function and I know there's some die hard Pizza Hut fans there as well. I was thinking of making a rectangular Pizza Hut Style and want to use the formula set out by Pete here http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=4607.msg38909#msg38909

I want to clarify a few things before I continue.

1) I will be using a mix of Bread Flour & Cake Flour - any precautions I should take?
2) I want to substitute the dry milk powder for full cream milk liquid - should I boil the milk first?
3) I will be using IDY instead of ADY - shall I keep it at 1.18%
4) I plan on making the Pizza tomorrow in a bulk dough in the fridge then roll it out to pan on Thursday - it will be left again in the fridge up until Saturday - do I need to lessen the yeast or make any changes to allow the dough to pull through the week?

Thanks and always look forward to the feedback of this great community
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on September 28, 2015, 11:58:58 AM
Hi Pizza Lovers  ;D

This week I'm attending a function and I know there's some die hard Pizza Hut fans there as well. I was thinking of making a rectangular Pizza Hut Style and want to use the formula set out by Pete here http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=4607.msg38909#msg38909

I want to clarify a few things before I continue.

1) I will be using a mix of Bread Flour & Cake Flour - any precautions I should take?
2) I want to substitute the dry milk powder for full cream milk liquid - should I boil the milk first?
3) I will be using IDY instead of ADY - shall I keep it at 1.18%
4) I plan on making the Pizza tomorrow in a bulk dough in the fridge then roll it out to pan on Thursday - it will be left again in the fridge up until Saturday - do I need to lessen the yeast or make any changes to allow the dough to pull through the week?
Mo,

What you propose represents a major reconstruction of the PH pan pizza clone without any guarantee that you will achieve the desired results. Maybe you will see what I am getting at by reading my comments to your specific questions.

1) I will be using a mix of Bread Flour & Cake Flour - any precautions I should take?

Any blend of bread flour and cake flour that you decide to use is likely to lower the absorption characteristics of the blend and require lowering the hydration value of the recipe. To get a sense of how much reduction is needed, you should use the Mixed-Mass Percentage Calculator at http://foodsim.toastguard.com/ (http://foodsim.toastguard.com/). Once you determine the protein content of the blend, you should lower the hydration value of the recipe accordingly. In the U.S., most bread flours have a rated absorption value of around 62%, so your final number will be lower than that depending on how much cake flour is used in the blend, and also the particular brand. In the U.S., a typical cake flour has a protein content of around 8% (http://www.generalmillscf.com/services/productpdf.ashx?pid=57181000 (http://www.generalmillscf.com/services/productpdf.ashx?pid=57181000)).

2) I want to substitute the dry milk powder for full cream milk liquid - should I boil the milk first?

Yes, should bring the milk to a boil and let it cool down before using. However, there are a couple of other matters that you will have to address. First, you will have to determine how much milk you need to be equivalent to the amount of dry milk powder called for in the PH clone recipe. Then, you will have to subtract the water content of the milk from the formula hydration. In the U.S. whole milk is about 88.1% water (http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/dairy-and-egg-products/69/2 (http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/dairy-and-egg-products/69/2)). It is the remaining 11.9% that you will be playing with.

3) I will be using IDY instead of ADY - shall I keep it at 1.18% and 4) I plan on making the Pizza tomorrow in a bulk dough in the fridge then roll it out to pan on Thursday - it will be left again in the fridge up until Saturday - do I need to lessen the yeast or make any changes to allow the dough to pull through the week?

If using IDY instead of ADY, you would want to use 0.885% IDY, or about 25% less than the ADY called for in the recipe. However, it is very doubtful that the dough will last five days in the refrigerator using that amount of IDY. You might use member Craig's yeast chart at Reply 188 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,26831.msg349349.html#msg349349 (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,26831.msg349349.html#msg349349), as well as your refrigerator temperature at which the dough is to be fermented, to see if you can come up with an amount of IDY to use for a five-day cold fermentation.

There is also another matter to consider. If you use an amount of dough as called for in the recipe but use a pan size with a different area than the round pan called for in the recipe, the finished characteristics will be different. To keep the finished characteristics the same, you will want to use the thickness factor for the PH clone, calculate the amount of dough for your pan size, and use the expanded dough calculating tool to recalculate the amounts of ingredients to use. But for purposes of the tool, you will need to go through the exercise discussed above, and calculate the baker's percents for all of the ingredients to be used in the tool.

Good luck.

Peter



Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: PizzaManic on September 29, 2015, 03:33:00 AM
Hi Pete-zza

Thanks for your always valued feedback.

Before I continue, I caught a small error on your last post. In your response to number 1, towards the end of your sentence, you mentioned "In the U.S., a typical bread flour has a protein content of around 8%" - I think you meant Cake Flour. Just thought it should be corrected in case someone misunderstands the response.

In response to your last post, I will number them in the same manner as I asked them.

1) My Cake Flour is 11.8% protein and bread flour is 13.1%. The absorption rate isn't listed. Will I need to reduce the hydration or leave it as is. What is the protein content of the flour that PH uses?

2) I think I'll skip the dry milk altogether. I cant believe there's no Non-Fat Dry milk available here in SA. They only have Full Cream Dry Milk Powder.

3&4) Not to mess with the original recipe too much, I will keep with the original yeast of 0.885% for IDY. How long should I Cold Ferment for?

5) I've added your last comment regarding the pan size as num 5  ;D . Can you provide the TF so I can work out the formula for my rectangular pan?

Thanks
Mo
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on September 29, 2015, 10:06:37 AM
Mo,

Thank you very much for catching my error. I have corrected the post.

Here are my additional comments based on your reply:

1) My Cake Flour is 11.8% protein and bread flour is 13.1%. The absorption rate isn't listed. Will I need to reduce the hydration or leave it as is. What is the protein content of the flour that PH uses?

I have never seen a cake flour in the U.S. with a protein content of around 11.8% so I will have to take your word for it for purposes of coming up with a blend with a protein content that is typical of a bread flour, which is the flour that is called for in the recipe you plan to use. I do not know what kind of flour PH actually used to make the pan pizza in question but if you look at the documents that I cited in Reply 3 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=39446.msg394631#msg394631 (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=39446.msg394631#msg394631), the only description of the PH flour is that it is bleached and malted (barley malt). That could mean anything from all-purpose flour to high-gluten flour. In the U.S., cake flours are almost always bleached but they usually are not malted, so I would rule out cake flour. I would tend to rule out a high-gluten flour as being too strong a flour for a pan pizza. That pretty much leaves us with bread flour. And in the U.S. bread flours have a typical protein content of about 12.7%. So, if we use that number as the target protein content in the Mixed Mass Percentage Calculator at http://foodsim.toastguard.com/ (http://foodsim.toastguard.com/), along with the 11.8% and 13.1% numbers you provided, a 70/30 blend of the bread flour and cake flour you have on hand will yield a protein content for the blend of 12.7%.

With respect to the possibility of needing to change the formula hydration, a typical bread flour has a rated absorption value of around 62%. That is a value that was once given to me for bread flour by a major U.S. flour retailer. Most millers do not publicize that information but will usually provide it upon request. The 62% hydration number is greater than the hydration value in the recipe you plan to use. However, if we add in the roughly 4.27% for the oil, which also has a "wetting" effect on the flour, we get 55.6 + 4.27 = 59.9%. That is still below 62% so you may want to increase the hydration by 62-59.9 = 2.1%.

2) I think I'll skip the dry milk altogether. I cant believe there's no Non-Fat Dry milk available here in SA. They only have Full Cream Dry Milk Powder.

In the U.S., pizza operators who use dry milk powder in their dough formulations tend to use a baker's grade version of that product that disables the whey protein that can affect dough performance. If you have the Full Cream Dry Milk Powder in SA, I would use that in the recipe and not worry about it.

3&4) Not to mess with the original recipe too much, I will keep with the original yeast of 0.885% for IDY. How long should I Cold Ferment for?

The instructions for the recipe you plan to use say to let the dough ferment for about four hours at room temperature or 24 hours overnight. 0.885% IDY should work quite well for the four hour scenario but it is perhaps too high for a 24-hour cold fermentation. You could perhaps cut that amount in half for the latter scenario.

5) I've added your last comment regarding the pan size as num 5  ;D . Can you provide the TF so I can work out the formula for my rectangular pan?

The thickness factor value you want to use is 0.14291.

Peter

Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: PizzaManic on October 05, 2015, 07:59:07 AM
Hello Good People

This past weekend I attempted the PH Style Formula discussed in this thread. At the same time, I decided to make up a batch of the Pan Style Pizza that Pete assisted me with some years ago which can be found here http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=6984.msg225067#msg225067

Pizza Hut Formula - 12" Pan

Flour (100%):
Water (58%):
IDY (0.5%):
Salt (0.875%):
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (4.27199%):
Sugar (1.875%):
Total (165.52199%):
271.19 g  |  9.57 oz | 0.6 lbs
157.29 g  |  5.55 oz | 0.35 lbs
1.36 g | 0.05 oz | 0 lbs | 0.45 tsp | 0.15 tbsp
2.37 g | 0.08 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.43 tsp | 0.14 tbsp
11.59 g | 0.41 oz | 0.03 lbs | 2.55 tsp | 0.85 tbsp
5.08 g | 0.18 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.28 tsp | 0.43 tbsp
448.88 g | 15.83 oz | 0.99 lbs | TF = 0.14


My Pan Pizza Formula - http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=6984.msg225067#msg225067
Flour (100%):
Water (60%):
IDY (0.5%):
Salt (2%):
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (2%):
Sugar (2.65%):
Total (167.15%):
253.11 g  |  8.93 oz | 0.56 lbs
151.87 g  |  5.36 oz | 0.33 lbs
1.27 g | 0.04 oz | 0 lbs | 0.42 tsp | 0.14 tbsp
5.06 g | 0.18 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.91 tsp | 0.3 tbsp
5.06 g | 0.18 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.11 tsp | 0.37 tbsp
6.71 g | 0.24 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.68 tsp | 0.56 tbsp
423.07 g | 14.92 oz | 0.93 lbs | TF = 0.13195

N.B. Both formulas above were made using the same flour combination. 70% Bread flour with a Protein content of 13.1% and 30% Cake Flour with a Protein Content of 11.8%.

Both the dough balls for the above formulas were prepared in an identical manner as mentioned below
1. Salt & Sugar dissolved into tap water.
2. Mix IDY and Flour then gradually add to water mixture till dough pulls together in scraggy looking ball.
3. Oil is then added and the dough further needed with a dough hook for about 4-5 minutes till it looses it's tackiness and can be easily handled.
4. I then ball the dough whilst at the same time hand kneading it for another 30 seconds or so.
5. It was then placed in a plastic packet and not oiled in any way. The dough's remained in the fridge for a total of 42hrs.

Baking - Oven was preheated for 1hr at 230C with the stone on the 2nd rack from the top.

My Pan Style
Pizza was removed from the fridge and rolled out immediately into the pan then left for 1hr and 45 mins to proof. Pizza was a Margarita with chopped tomato. It was placed on the last rack of my oven and my timer was set for 9 Minutes. I then moved it to the top rack with the stone and top broiler on for 2 minutes until cheese began to bubble and brown spots of cheese began appearing. Total Bake time 11mins. Pizza was then removed and placed on a cooling rack.

PH Style
Pizza was removed from the fridge and rolled out immediately into the pan then left for 1hr and 55 mins to proof. Pizza was topped with Steak, Green Peppers, Onion & Red Chilli then finished off with some BBQ sauce. It was placed on the last rack of my oven and my timer was set for 8 Minutes. I then moved it to the top rack with the stone and after a minute I switched on the top broiler for 2 minutes until cheese began to bubble and brown spots of cheese began appearing. I then moved it back to the bottom rack for a minute before it was removed from the oven. Total Bake time 12 mins.


Now comes a little bit of a twist. Both Pizzas were not consumed immediately but were rather taken to a family get together. By now the pizzas were cold so at the house of my host I switched on the broiler of the oven and thought I'd reheat the Margarita first since there were kids around who were very hungry. As I began to remove it out of the pan that we took it in, I reached underneath the pizza and then realized that the middle of the pizza was not done. As I removed my hand, I noticed sticky bits of dough that did not bake - boy was  I irritated  >:( . When the Pizza was removed from the oven at home, It looked completely baked - the underneath had a golden fried look to it but I didn't look as far as towards the middle so I suspect my oven has some hot spots and cold spots.

PH Style Final Bake & Thoughts
I left the margarita pizza as is and went on to heat up the PH Style pizza which was topped with Steak. This Pizza was baked perfectly so i placed it directly on the Oven rack with the oven broiler on only and allowed just the cheese on the top to bubble a bit before I removed it, sliced and served it. All I can say i WOW!. This was one incredible Pizza and far out wins my Pan Style Pizza. The Crumb was extremely light and not dense at all but rather loose in structure. The bottom lost a bit of it's crisp due to it being reheated I guess but none the less is was Divine. Everyone couldn't stop raving how great the pizza turned out and I even got scolded at for only bringing 1 like that  :'( . The comments I recieved were "Very Light" / "Don't need to tug away when biting in to it" / "Moist Inside".

My Pan Pizza Style Final Bake & Thoughts
As for the margaritta, fortunately my host had a Pizza Stone which I preheated for about 25 mins then placed the pizza directly on to it. It was baked at 180C for about 5 mins till I was satisfied that bottom was now definatley baked and then it was served. This Pizza didn't turn out very good - the crumb was very weak and just broke apart when slicing. I should note that the Pizza was still light and crisp though but not as good as the PH style - not even close  ^^^

Future Changes
The only thing I would change on my next attempt with the PH Style Pizza is decrease the Thickness Factor to 1.37 and add the Powedered Milk as I didn't have any to add for this attempt so I skipped it all together. I'd also like to strengthen the crumb just a little bit as I found that it was overly tender and was breaking here and there when slicing or holding a slice in my hand with the tip of the pizza drooping - it felt like it's going to break in half.

Sorry but there's no pictures unfortunately - the Margarita distracted me and by the time I went to grab a shot - all the slices were gone. I have been requested to please make this Pizza again so definately expect pics next time.

Let me know if you have any suggestions on how I could accomplish the changes I'd like to effect on my next attempt

Take Care
Mo
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: PizzaManic on November 13, 2015, 07:55:44 AM
Another attempt at the PH Recipe and it was Lovely.

I used the formula below with a TF of 0.135

Flour (100%):    155.25 g  |  5.48 oz | 0.34 lbs
Water (58%):    90.04 g  |  3.18 oz | 0.2 lbs
IDY (0.5%):    0.78 g | 0.03 oz | 0 lbs | 0.26 tsp | 0.09 tbsp
Salt (0.875%):    1.36 g | 0.05 oz | 0 lbs | 0.24 tsp | 0.08 tbsp
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (4.27199%):    6.63 g | 0.23 oz | 0.01 lbs | 1.46 tsp | 0.49 tbsp
Sugar (1.875%):    2.91 g | 0.1 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.73 tsp | 0.24 tbsp
Total (165.52199%):   256.96 g | 9.06 oz | 0.57 lbs | TF = 0.13635

Method

1. Prepared dough in exact same manor as described in my previous post. Dough was made on Wednesday Night and left in the fridge for 18 hours before it was removed and left at room temp for a further 3 hours.
2. Topped with Chick, Chilli Sauce, Onion, Green Pepper, Red Chilli & Moz/Gouda Mix.
3. Baked on lowest oven rack at 230C without stone for 3 mins then moved to middle rack with stone for 3 mins.
4. Bottom was baked really well and I caught it in time before it burned.

Thoughts
I was really impressed with this attempt - the rim had the perfect Crisp/Crunch factor. The bottom of the pizza was just the right crisp which led to a light and extra airy interior.

Changes in Future
I wont mess too much with the formula as I think I've hit the sweet spot with the Thickness Factor. I used Sunflower Oil in the bottom of the pan and I suspect this isn't leaving a very pleasing taste especially when the pizza is reheated - just had a couple slices now and could get that bad oily taste.
I found the interior just a little too light and airy - I think it can do with a little bit extra bake time at a lesser temperature. Perhaps I'll drop temp to 210 and bake for about 8 mins - 6 of these minutes on the rack above the lowest rack and the last 2 mins on the top most rack with the stone.

Overall, I'm satisfied with this recipe but can us Pizza Freaks ever stop tinkering with what works - we always want to push the limit  :P

Take Care and enjoy the pics
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: oliveview on November 17, 2015, 01:49:10 PM
I'm considering giving this dough recipe (likely the baker's percentage version) a shot this week. However, I'm curious about opinions / experience with the exact steps of the ~24hr cold ferment: I actually don't have the exact 14" pan yet, and I'm hoping to maybe get one tomorrow. But I'd like to create my dough this evening. So, if I simply follow the initial instructions, but simply ball the dough and put it in the fridge, then roll it out and put it in the pan the next day, an hour or two before I cook it, would that work? Or are there important chemical aspects to having the dough rolled, and proofed in the oiled pan for a whole day?

Thanks!
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Stevezilla on November 17, 2015, 06:46:14 PM
I am sure you could ball it and spread it into the pan after the rise, but it would be less like the pizza it is trying to emulate.  There are other pan pizza recipes that follow the workflow you are suggesting.

Keep in mind you can do only four hour ferment with this recipe. That is all I have other done. So you could easily get your pan and make the pizza same day.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: oliveview on November 17, 2015, 07:04:25 PM
I am sure you could ball it and spread it into the pan after the rise, but it would be less like the pizza it is trying to emulate.  There are other pan pizza recipes that follow the workflow you are suggesting.

Keep in mind you can do only four hour ferment with this recipe. That is all I have other done. So you could easily get your pan and make the pizza same day.

Thanks for the input. I think I'll get my pan, then make the dough. For my first attempt, I think I'd like to adhere as close as possible to the original recipe from post #1. Indeed, four-hours is mentioned, but xPHmgr specifically left in the fridge for 24hrs. Knowing just how much of a difference some of the smallest details can sometimes make with dough chemistry, I'll get a baseline before I start tweaking.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: oliveview on November 29, 2015, 09:42:03 PM
Okay. I just gave this dough a whirl. Results were not close to what would have been expected. Easily, the most obvious problem with mine was it simply didn't rise anywhere near enough. The final baked crust was rather dense, and nothing like what a PH pan resembles.

Here are the salient facts:

- I used the revised baker's percentages, for the 14" pan (Chicago Metallic, in my case).
- I adhered as close as I could. I used AP flour, as I wasn't clear whether that was preferred over bread?
- Followed the exact mixing steps, per the very first post in this thread.
- Let the dough proof at room temp, rolled out, in the oiled pan, for about two hours.
- Proceeded to then start a ~24 cold ferment.
- Took pan out and let rest back at room temp for two-hours.
- Dressed and cooked pizza: 500º - pan on pizza stone on middle rack - ~40min pre-heat - 15 minutes total bake

It didn't taste horrible, and was edible enough, but right from the very first day, it was clear that it was not rising anywhere near enough. Where the original recipe here indicates ~1.5 inch high initial proof, before the CF. Mine was literally only about a 1/2 inch, and hadn't even expanded to the edges of the 14" pan.

Little more happened during the 24hr CF, and even with the additional 2-hour room temp rest before cooking, it never rose like it should have.

So...any of your experts have any idea where I might look to figure out how I came off the rails?

Thanks!!!
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: PizzaManic on December 21, 2015, 04:20:12 AM
Hello Pizza Friends

I've been having great success with this formula however I have encountered a small problem which I'm hoping someone can guide me into fixing

I use a Sunflower Oil in both the Dough Formula as well as to grease my pan before placing the rolled out dough into it. The Pizza Bakes up pretty nicely with a golden bottoms that crisps nicely underneath as well as the edges which then leads to a light airy inside with just the right chew. I found one small problem though - the oil I use lends to a slightly bad taste that's almost hard to detect when the Pizza is fresh out the oven however this worsens as the pizza sits and lets not even go to reheating of the pizza the next day because the taste is very noticeable.

I remember reading a little about using shortening in the pan instead of oil which will also lead to an increased crisp on the crust - I can't for life of me find the information.

1. What are your thoughts on this? I have Margarines available here - will this work?

2. What about substituting something like butter or olive oil in the Dough Formula - I know this is not recommended in the pan because both these have low smoke points.

Love to hear if anyone has tried this and how did you like it?

Thanks
MO
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: mbrulato on December 21, 2015, 08:41:12 AM
Mo,

I think I used vegetable (soybean) oil when I tried this formula and it turned out well.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Stevezilla on December 22, 2015, 06:33:48 PM
I also have only used vegetable oil with this particular recipe. For me it is just because that is what pizza hut does, and the recipe is a clone of their product. Other pan recipes I feel more free to play with the oil.  That said, knock yourself out trying something new! If we can't play with this, we can't play with anything.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: MaximRecoil on January 25, 2016, 04:24:26 PM
I've loved Pizza Hut's pan pizza ever since I was a kid in the '80s. If I tried to make one of these, the true measure of success for me would be how the leftover slices tasted cold the next morning, straight out of the refrigerator. Pizza Hut pan pizza, specifically their Super Supreme or Meat Lover's, is the only type of pizza that I like cold for breakfast.

When I was a kid, we often went to Bangor on Friday nights (45 minutes away from my small hometown which only had typical, very average, pizzas made with standard Sysco foodservice ingredients at Mom & Pop's convenience stores which didn't specialize in pizza), and Pizza Hut was one of the places we often ate at while there. My parents always ordered the same thing: Super Supreme pan pizza, which was fine by me because I loved it. And then, there was nothing better than waking up the next morning at about 7 o'clock, grabbing the box of leftover slices from the refrigerator, and watching Saturday morning cartoons. This doesn't work with any other type of pizza, not even with ones that I like just as well or better when eaten hot, at least not for me.   
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: MisterPKM on January 30, 2016, 09:03:22 PM
Hello all,

So I've been really digging pan pizza lately, but am looking to order some pans from Lloyd. I like my cast iron, but really love how clean and easy Lloyd products are. Any recs from their site?
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: lloydrep on February 02, 2016, 12:53:22 PM
There are several choices of LloydPans that could fit your style. Definitely order dark anodized pans with PSTK coating. Dark pans cook hotter and PSTK is easy to maintain.
I hope this helps. Here is a coupon code you and all forum users can use for 10% off at lloydpans.com: PMF10
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: notoriousFOZ on March 13, 2016, 01:25:48 PM
I've been making this recipe regularly using 2 9" square Wilton Ultra Pro bake heavy gauge pans from Target.  Dough ball split into two with a small leftover.  Pics are of a 16.5ish oz dough ball.  Crust is brushed with roasted garlic butter.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: PizzaManic on April 19, 2016, 10:31:17 AM
Hi

I'm attempting this formula once again but I will be changing 2 very important variables.
The first is I would like to substitute Butter for oil. I will be using Salted butter - can I do a straight 1:1 substitution?
Secondly, I will be using margarine instead of oil in the bottom of my pan - any precautions?

Here's my formula below

Flour (100%):
Water (58%):
IDY (0.5%):
Salt (0.875%):
Sugar (1.875%):
Butter/Margarine (4.27%):
Total (165.52%):
Single Ball:
528.25 g  |  18.63 oz | 1.16 lbs
306.39 g  |  10.81 oz | 0.68 lbs
2.64 g | 0.09 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.88 tsp | 0.29 tbsp
4.62 g | 0.16 oz | 0.01 lbs | 0.83 tsp | 0.28 tbsp
9.9 g | 0.35 oz | 0.02 lbs | 2.48 tsp | 0.83 tbsp
22.56 g | 0.8 oz | 0.05 lbs | 4.77 tsp | 1.59 tbsp
874.36 g | 30.84 oz | 1.93 lbs | TF = 0.13635
437.18 g | 15.42 oz | 0.96 lbs

Thanks
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Jackie Tran on April 19, 2016, 10:51:01 AM
You can do a 1:1 substitution using butter instead of oil.   Since you are using salted butter I would drop the salt in the formula.   Just melt the butter first before adding it to the dough.

I don't thin there is any concern for using the Margerine in the bottom.  Why not just use butter instead?
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: The Lord Of The Pizza on May 08, 2016, 01:36:42 AM
Slayter,

Sometime you might want to take a look at the modified PH recipe as set forth at Reply 6 at:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4607.msg38909.html#msg38909

Peter
Pete, are these numbers for the Carnation brand Dry Milk?  Also, how do you go about adding the the Milk Powder in specifically.  I see on that post that you are supposed to scald the Carnation brand to deactivate the whey.  How much water do you add and this goes back into the dough correct?  Do you just follow the water amount on the back of the Carnation package for whatever amount you use?  You are not just adding the powder dry with the flour, correct or are we just adding the powder with the flour?

Also what are the mixing instructions for a stand mixer and then to pan?  Is there a specific amount of oil I need to add to the pans?  Sorry for all the questions I am just trying to get all the info tied in one place for the above recipe.

All the best!
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on May 08, 2016, 10:45:38 AM
Pete, are these numbers for the Carnation brand Dry Milk?  Also, how do you go about adding the the Milk Powder in specifically.  I see on that post that you are supposed to scald the Carnation brand to deactivate the whey.  How much water do you add and this goes back into the dough correct?  Do you just follow the water amount on the back of the Carnation package for whatever amount you use?  You are not just adding the powder dry with the flour, correct or are we just adding the powder with the flour?

Also what are the mixing instructions for a stand mixer and then to pan?  Is there a specific amount of oil I need to add to the pans?  Sorry for all the questions I am just trying to get all the info tied in one place for the above recipe.

All the best!
The Lord of the Pizza,

I do not recall that I actually tried the recipe I posted but I went into some detail about the milk because I suspected that our members, who are mostly home pizza hobbyists, would not have access to the baker's grade of dry milk that I suspected PH used at the time. The numbers I gave were for the Carnation dry milk powder that, as I recall, had to be reconstituted by adding water to it. I suggested that the water used to reconstitute the dry milk powder be hot since I saw no evidence on the carton of the Carnation product that their product was baker's grade. In fact, I think I later had an exchange with Carnation customer service who confirmed that their product was not baker's grade. I mentioned the use of fresh milk already in liquid form, and reheating same, to be sure that the offending whey protein be disabled. When using fresh milk, one should reduce the amount of the formula water by the amount of fresh milk used. For the Carnation product, I would follow the instructions on the package to reconstitute it, using a part of the formula water for this purpose. The only time you would add the dry milk powder directly to the flour or other dry ingredients without reconstitution would be if the dry milk powder is baker's grade.

A lot of the above explanation and advice is out of an excess of caution. Products are constantly being changed and improved and it may well be that one can safely get away with using the standard supermarket grades of dry milk powder without reconstitution and get acceptable results.

As for the rest of your questions about preparation of the dough, you might look at the instructions given at http://www.pizzamaking.com/panpizza.php.

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: The Lord Of The Pizza on May 08, 2016, 01:31:17 PM
The Lord of the Pizza,

I do not recall that I actually tried the recipe I posted but I went into some detail about the milk because I suspected that our members, who are mostly home pizza hobbyists, would not have access to the baker's grade of dry milk that I suspected PH used at the time. The numbers I gave were for the Carnation dry milk powder that, as I recall, had to be reconstituted by adding water to it. I suggested that the water used to reconstitute the dry milk powder be hot since I saw no evidence on the carton of the Carnation product that their product was baker's grade. In fact, I think I later had an exchange with Carnation customer service who confirmed that their product was not baker's grade. I mentioned the use of fresh milk already in liquid form, and reheating same, to be sure that the offending whey protein be disabled. When using fresh milk, one should reduce the amount of the formula water by the amount of fresh milk used. For the Carnation product, I would follow the instructions on the package to reconstitute it, using a part of the formula water for this purpose. The only time you would add the dry milk powder directly to the flour or other dry ingredients without reconstitution would be if the dry milk powder is baker's grade.

A lot of the above explanation and advice is out of an excess of caution. Products are constantly being changed and improved and it may well be that one can safely get away with using the standard supermarket grades of dry milk powder without reconstitution and get acceptable results.

As for the rest of your questions about preparation of the dough, you might look at the instructions given at http://www.pizzamaking.com/panpizza.php.

Peter
Thank you so much for the clarification and helping me getting this sorted out.  I may be a Lord Of The Pizza but you sit on the Pizza Throne.

Also, I found these instructions: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=4067.msg33990#msg33990 at Reply #5

I am making a note of them here so I can find them.  Is this approach more solid than the "original"?
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on May 08, 2016, 01:42:27 PM

Also, I found these instructions: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=4067.msg33990#msg33990 at Reply #5

I am making a note of them here so I can find them.  Is this approach more solid than the "original"?
The Lord of the Pizza,

It's hard to say which approach is the better one. But both posters worked at PH at one time, and were managers, so presumably they knew what they were doing. Yet, it is also true that there are variations in the ways that things are done from one PH store to another. You might just pick one approach and try it out but be willing to try the other approach if the first one doesn't do the trick.

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: The Lord Of The Pizza on May 08, 2016, 02:16:02 PM
The Lord of the Pizza,

It's hard to say which approach is the better one. But both posters worked at PH at one time, and were managers, so presumably they knew what they were doing. Yet, it is also true that there are variations in the ways that things are done from one PH store to another. You might just pick one approach and try it out but be willing to try the other approach if the first one doesn't do the trick.

Peter
Pete,
I also picked through and found this nugget regarding amount of oil to add to the bottom of the pan:  http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=4067.msg328420#msg328420  Reply# 33

Yes, I remember those big jugs when I worked at Pizza Hut, but I seem to remember somewhere on the pump it said 1 pump = 1.5 oz.  So a large was 4.5 oz and med was 3 oz (small was 1 pump).  When I was there (late 80's/early 90's), we weighed everything out, and all the topping weights worked out such that a large equaled a medium + a small.  Same for pepperoni, something like 10 for a small, 20 for a medium, and 30 for a large.  Later, at least the cheese was switched to different colored cups such that large got a blue cup, medium was a (smaller) white cup.  Saved time versus weighing out (although, after a while you got pretty good at hitting it when weighing).  This thread does bring back a lot of memories  :)

and of course there is another post on that thread with double that amount.
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=4067.msg33990#msg33990  Reply#5



Here are the WEIGHTS of the various sizes:
Large Pan (14")  22 oz.
Medium Pan (12")  16 oz.  (Same weight for Breadsticks as well...will discuss later)

Portion your dough, keeping both the large wad of dough and your newly formed dough balls covered (this prevents it from becoming dry and crusty...not very appealing to the eye.

After portioning, cover your dough balls, and have a glass of wine...or a smoke...or call your mom (let them rest for about 10 minutes.)

Oil your required pans.  Pizza Hut uses 9 oz of vegetable oil for large and 6 oz for medium.



 I am inclined to first try the lesser amount of oil used in Reply # 33. 

And for posterity sake I will list the percentages of the most recent baker`s percentage formulation as laid out by Pete some time ago:

Flour (100%):
Water (55.555%):
ADY (1.18518%):
Salt (0.875%):
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (4.27199%):
Sugar (1.875%):
Dry Non-Fat Milk (2.35155%):
Total (166.11372%):
thickness factor = 0.14291; no bowl residue compensation

And here is the sauce that seems to be a near match made by Jackie Tran and found at reply #25 at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=4452.msg412244#msg412244
Listed as follows:
Wanted to update the Pizza Hut Sauce Recipe here.   

1 (6 oz) can of tomato paste.  This will make enough sauce for a 13x10 square pan pizza with sauce to spare.
2/3 cup - 3/4 cup water.  Dilute sauce to desired consistency.
1 tsp oregano
1/2 tsp dry basil
1/2 tsp majoram
1/4 tsp garlic powder
1 tsp sugar.  You can add a bit more after you make the sauce if desired
1/2 tsp MSG (optional)
1/2 tsp salt (adjust to taste)

Mix all the spices in water and then mix your paste in.  You have to warm or cook the sauce for just a minute or two.  Add more water in small increments to desired consistency.  The sauce is best made the night before and allow to sit in the fridge overnight.

As for topping amounts: http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=4067.msg33991#msg33991  Reply #6


Back to the Cheese and the amounts used. (and, the one criticism of the amateur's pizza that I had.)

All amounts here are approximated, since we portion with cups reflecting the size of the intended pie, not a numeric measurement.
Using a dry measure cup.
Medium (total):  2 cups (3 cups if a cheese pizza)
Large (total):  3 cups (4.5 cups if a cheese pizza)

If you are making a pepperoni and cheese or a ham and cheese pizza, put all of the cheese on top of the sauce, with the slices of meat being the last thing applied.  If you add anything to it, like sausage or olives or onions...etc.) put half of the cheese down, then the ingredients, the top it with the other half of the cheese.  You'll find that it looks more appetizing and that the ingredients stay where they belong when you cut it.  :)


Anything else, just ask!

I think that about covers everything as I am trying to condense all relevant information to date in one post in the hopes of helping myself and other find Pizza Hut perfection.

Here are also two threads I will reference just for note and reading on Pizza Hut Pan style:
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=28134.msg284226#msg284226
http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=4067.0


Note on sizes: Large Pan (14")  22 oz.
Medium Pan (12")  16 oz.
Personal pan, small (6")


Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: RogerC on July 12, 2016, 07:53:21 AM
Made another Pizza Hut clone this weekend.  My Mom is a pizza junkie and wanted "pizza supreme" for her birthday.
Sausage, Canadian bacon, pepperoni, mushroom, green, pepper onion, and black olives.  It was a great pie thanks again to this great recipe
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on July 12, 2016, 10:43:24 AM
RogerC,

You did a nice job. Can you tell us specifically which recipe you used?

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: RogerC on July 12, 2016, 12:15:56 PM
RogerC,

You did a nice job. Can you tell us specifically which recipe you used?

Peter

Peter,

Thanks for the kind words, success is credit to the pizza gurus on this site

I would be glad to tell you the recipe(s).

When I fist stumbled on this thread I was droolin'  :drool: over the pie in post #187 by xsosx here http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=213.175 (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=213.175).  For the dough I used your scaled down formula here in reply #6 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4607.msg38909.html#msg38909 (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4607.msg38909.html#msg38909) and finally for the sauce I used Jackie Tran's recipe (minus the MSG) in reply #7 here http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4452.msg92245.html#msg92245 (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4452.msg92245.html#msg92245).

I closely follow those three posts and they produce a flawless PH pan clone IMO.  I have even converted them to recipe card on my tablet for easy reference while cooking. 
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: The Lord Of The Pizza on July 12, 2016, 03:32:26 PM
Peter,

Thanks for the kind words, success is credit to the pizza gurus on this site

I would be glad to tell you the recipe(s).

When I fist stumbled on this thread I was droolin'  :drool: over the pie in post #187 by xsosx here http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=213.175 (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=213.175).  For the dough I used your scaled down formula here in reply #6 http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4607.msg38909.html#msg38909 (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4607.msg38909.html#msg38909) and finally for the sauce I used Jackie Tran's recipe (minus the MSG) in reply #7 here http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4452.msg92245.html#msg92245 (http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4452.msg92245.html#msg92245).

I closely follow those three posts and they produce a flawless PH pan clone IMO.  I have even converted them to recipe card on my tablet for easy reference while cooking.
What size pan and how much oil did you use in the pan?  Looks great!  This is on my list to try and have a plan of attack- See above. :)
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: RogerC on July 12, 2016, 07:41:33 PM
What size pan and how much oil did you use in the pan?  Looks great!  This is on my list to try and have a plan of attack- See above. :)

I used a 14 inch cake pan and 1/2 cup or 4 Oz oil.  You really should try it, its great pizza.

-rog
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: The Lord Of The Pizza on August 28, 2016, 10:06:50 PM
I found this while searching for the correct amount of oil Pizza Hut uses in the pans

https://www.zauba.com/import-oil-pump-plastic/hs-code-39241090-hs-code.html

Seems to be a place where the oil pumps are ordered.  I think it says 22 grams per pump.

Sound right?
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: The Lord Of The Pizza on August 28, 2016, 10:30:25 PM
Doing a little more digging, I found this:

A place where Pizza Hut (at least some or someones Pizza Hut) orders all their kitchenware and supplies from:

https://apps.ufpc.com/equipmentsales/PDF/Catalogs/PH_SMC_Catalog.pdf
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Peetie on September 05, 2016, 02:25:58 PM
I did a quick version. I'm too impatient to wait for dough to properly develop. I also like to experiment.

Dry:
1 cup bread flour
1 cup AP flour
salt

Wet:
1 packet ADY yeast
3/4 c water
1 tsp brown sugar
1Tblsp EVOO

Proofed yeast. Mixed wet to dry, kneaded with my KitchenAid w/paddle. Covered bowl. Took an hour to rise. Heavily oiled 14" dia steel pan with 3/4" lip (like Pizza Hut used to use) Probably 3 to 4 Tblsp oil. I used corn oil. Better fllavor than canola. Rolled out dough with a rolling pin to 14" dia. and put in pan. Let rise in the pan, covered with a towel for about an hour. Assembled using some Amatriciana sauce I had left over, oregano, Polly-0 whole milk mozza, and Margherita pepperoni. 500 degrees til done. the whole process was less than 2 1/2 hours and came out great. Nice brown crusty bottom, but soft interior and the top didn't get overly brown. I hate crusty brown mozza. Anyway, just my take.

Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: csnack on October 03, 2016, 10:00:24 PM
What temp should the dough be after its done kneading and is ready to sit covered on the counter for that hour before the 24 hours in the fridge? Sorry if I missed this info if it was posted in the thread back there somewhere.. but, I'm planning to make this this weekend and I'll be using Petezaa's scaled version.. AND I'll be using my 14-cup Cuisinart food processor to make the dough. I'll follow the original directions to room rise in the pan for an hour followed by 24 hours in the fridge (at 39f in my case) followed by 2 hours back on the counter to come back to room temp before baking. Since I'll be using the food processor is why I was wondering what the ideal temp of dough should be after kneading. I don't think temp of water was mentioned, but would the rule of thumb to use ice water with the food processor apply to this dough too? One more thing please.. would there be any benefit to letting it stay in the fridge for 72 hours like NY, maybe with a reduced yeast amount to accommodate that long of a cold ferment?
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on October 03, 2016, 10:35:43 PM
csnack,

I believe the instructions for the PH clone pizza you plan to make are set forth at:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/panpizza.php

However, another member who worked for PH discussed how the PH pan pizzas were made while he worked for them, including finished dough temperature, in the thread at:

http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=4067.msg33930#msg33930

It looks like you have a couple of ways to proceed. I also think that you could reduce the amount of yeast and let the dough cold ferment for a few days. However, that may produce a finished product that deviates from the classic PH pan pizza. But that shouldn't deter you at some point from trying a multi-day version.

Peter

Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: csnack on October 04, 2016, 05:11:12 AM
you rock pete thanks brother
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Peetie on October 05, 2016, 12:19:00 PM
See reply 359 for my "quick version" recipe. This time I used Italian sausage, Margherita pepperoni, and black olives, Polly-o whole milk mozza, and a quick sauce with lotsa minced garlic sauteed in evoo, Tuttarossa crushed toms and Herbes De Provence. This time I will try to post pics. Wish me luck. Pics are my 14" well seasoned steel pan with 1 1/2" lip, second rise in pan, dressed,and  bottom crust.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: csnack on October 05, 2016, 11:45:40 PM
See reply 359 for my "quick version" recipe. This time I used Italian sausage, Margherita pepperoni, and black olives, Polly-o whole milk mozza, and a quick sauce with lotsa minced garlic sauteed in evoo, Tuttarossa crushed toms and Herbes De Provence. This time I will try to post pics. Wish me luck. Pics are my 14" well seasoned steel pan with 1 1/2" lip, second rise in pan, dressed,and  bottom crust.
Ever made a sourdough version of this? That's what I really want.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: bifi85 on November 22, 2017, 03:02:56 PM
My pan pizza didn't really brown at the bottom. I used a 480°F hot oven put a pizza stone in the middle and heated all up for 1h. I took the cold big iron pan 0,4 inch (1 cm) with the pan pizza inside 2h before out of the fridge, to get room temperature. I put the iron pan on the pizza stone and after 10 min I had to take out the pizza, because it got very brown on top. I let the pizza 5 min in the pan, before I removed it. The problem was that the bottom was only very very light crisp. I needed more heat in the bottom, what should I do?
I could heat the pan on cooktop before I put it into the oven, but this is "waste". Do you have any idea what I can do to get a more crisp and more cooked bottom? Additional I used a bit too much oil for my taste, but it was the original "medium size" measurement.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: csnack on November 23, 2017, 12:31:38 AM
My pan pizza didn't really brown at the bottom. I used a 480°F hot oven put a pizza stone in the middle and heated all up for 1h. I took the cold big iron pan 0,4 inch (1 cm) with the pan pizza inside 2h before out of the fridge, to get room temperature. I put the iron pan on the pizza stone and after 10 min I had to take out the pizza, because it got very brown on top. I let the pizza 5 min in the pan, before I removed it. The problem was that the bottom was only very very light crisp. I needed more heat in the bottom, what should I do?
  • Don't use pizza stone under the pan (alternative grid)
  • Use a thinner pan?
I could heat the pan on cooktop before I put it into the oven, but this is "waste". Do you have any idea what I can do to get a more crisp and more cooked bottom? Additional I used a bit too much oil for my taste, but it was the original "medium size" measurement.
Next course of action would be to try a longer bake time at a lower temp - say 450° for 14-16 or so minutes w/ 180 spin in between. And possibly a lower oven rack if necessary. You find out if it's necessary by baking pizzas and dialing it in. But 480° for 10 minutes is generally too hot and not a long enough bake time for a 14" PH clone.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: csnack on November 23, 2017, 12:36:25 AM
Next course of action would be to try a longer bake time at a lower temp - say 450° for 14-16 or so minutes w/ 180 spin in between. And possibly a lower oven rack if necessary. You find out if it's necessary by baking pizzas and dialing it in. But 480° for 10 minutes is generally too hot and not a long enough bake time for a 14" PH clone.
A 14"x2" 14 guage aluminum dark anodized pan that has been well seasoned, and used in conjunction with the stone, works great for this style.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: lloydrep on November 27, 2017, 01:24:22 PM
LloydPans 14x2 inch nesting pans are coated with Pre-Seasoned Tuff-Kote and need no seasoning, are metal utensil safe and the pan of choice by many of the large pizza brands. Check them out here: https://www.lloydpans.com/standard-pans/pizza-tools/deep-dish-pans/deep-dish-nesting (https://www.lloydpans.com/standard-pans/pizza-tools/deep-dish-pans/deep-dish-nesting)
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: HarryHaller73 on December 28, 2017, 01:05:49 AM
Pizza Hut's pizza is infinitely better lately.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Peetie on April 19, 2018, 01:06:19 PM
I believe the powdered milk just kicks up the calcium content. I use the same recipe, but my quantities for as single pie is 3/4 cup warm water with a tsp brown sugar, and a tsp IDY and 1 Tbsp evoo to proof yeast. First rise in bowl, second in black iron 14" pan. My vegetable oil of choice is corn oil. Somehow, that flavor reminds me of a Pizza Hut pan pizza taste.  After the second rise, I put on toppings and right into the oven, no stone, no 4 hour refrigeration. Don't have the patience! Comes out great everytime. I've tried 100% bread flour, 100% AP flour and a 50/50 mix. I just think the 100% bread flour has better flavor and texture.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: MadMatt on May 04, 2018, 08:09:03 PM
I've made so many Papa Johns clones and although I said I'd try to perfect it I'm totally sick of that so I'm  moving onto other styles  I want thinner NY style pizza and then a nice thick slab of greasy  pan pizza that was always a favourite of mine. 


I'm not sure how it will work in my oven. Basically my ovens heating element is not at the bottom, but the back.   I could never do a Papa Johns style on a screen because there was not enough bottom heat and the top cooked fast.

So I use a 3/8" steel that does a great job browning the bottom.  If I just use a pan and put that in the oven I don't think it will get enough bottom heat but maybe putting the pan on the steel would work? especially with a good quality anodised aluminium pan those things transfer heat so fast I have a bread pan made out of it.







Looking at these recipes isn't the salt way on the low side?  I recall Pizza Hut being very greasy and salty.



How much oil are people putting for a 14" and I mean in the pan not the actual dough?

Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Peetie on May 05, 2018, 08:52:16 AM
You are right about the salt. I forgot to mention that I added about a teaspoon of salt to my flour. As far as the corn oil, I use a couple of tablespoons to the pan. More than that makes it too greasy for me. A little evoo sprinkled over the top helps!
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: MadMatt on May 09, 2018, 04:07:11 PM


Whats the deal with having it rise at room temp, then putting in the fridge? the instructions say roll to about 3/4" thick  then you let it rise to nearly 1 1/2" (isn't that the height of their pans?)   then you're putting in the fridge for 4 to 24 hours surely with all the yeast in the recipe  and that its risen so much already its going to end up like a mushroom?

I must be misreading this because it's all confusing to me.


I always figured you just put the dough in the pan and cook once its risen a little. The more you let it rise like a loaf, the thicker and more bread like it will be.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: MadMatt on May 09, 2018, 06:20:15 PM
Had this pop up in recommended videos today couldn't see if it had been posted before. 

1988 pizza hut training video 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7HpCJov3Uj0


Really counting the pepperoni... 4:25

 ::)


I'm interested in that fairy dust at 6:24   

Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on May 09, 2018, 06:33:49 PM
MadMatt,

The video you cited was referenced a while back at Reply 537 at https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=35831.msg514063;topicseen#msg514063.

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: SonVolt on May 29, 2018, 10:47:08 AM
My pan pizza didn't really brown at the bottom. I used a 480°F hot oven put a pizza stone in the middle and heated all up for 1h. I took the cold big iron pan 0,4 inch (1 cm) with the pan pizza inside 2h before out of the fridge, to get room temperature. I put the iron pan on the pizza stone and after 10 min I had to take out the pizza, because it got very brown on top. I let the pizza 5 min in the pan, before I removed it. The problem was that the bottom was only very very light crisp. I needed more heat in the bottom, what should I do?
  • Don't use pizza stone under the pan (alternative grid)
  • Use a thinner pan?
I could heat the pan on cooktop before I put it into the oven, but this is "waste". Do you have any idea what I can do to get a more crisp and more cooked bottom? Additional I used a bit too much oil for my taste, but it was the original "medium size" measurement.



Use a Baking Steel, not a stone and lower the oven temp to around 425F-450F. Steel will radiate much more heat up through the pizza pan and browning the bottom. 
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: SonVolt on May 29, 2018, 10:52:51 AM
Oh, and don't be shy with the oil in the pan... it's almost obnoxiously excessive for true classic Pizza Hut style.

Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Hans O. Lowe on July 06, 2018, 12:06:27 PM
Had this pop up in recommended videos today couldn't see if it had been posted before. 

1988 pizza hut training video 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7HpCJov3Uj0


Really counting the pepperoni... 4:25

 ::)


I'm interested in that fairy dust at 6:24  

I found this recipe for "Fairy Dust" I haven't tried it yet, but sounds like it should be good...

http://www.huskerboard.com/index.php?/topic/53578-breadstick-seasoning/
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: LeonP on July 31, 2018, 12:00:59 AM
Edit: Disregard, found the info I was looking for. Going to try one of these this weekend in my 14" pan :D
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: LeonP on August 02, 2018, 01:04:21 PM
3 questions maybe someone who has run this recipe before can help me out with:

1) In the initial rise/ferment at room temp, how long would you say you expect for the dough to rise and fill out the pan before refrigeration?
2) How long before baking should I remove my pan from the fridge? Should the dough be going into the oven cold and topped?
3) When the OP says stretch out to 12", this is assume a 14" pan and it will fill out during the rising/fermenting period, correct?

Thanks a lot!
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: LeonP on August 04, 2018, 01:44:03 PM
Alright, I made the recipe and it turned out well I feel!

For the dough I used Pete-zza's revised formula here: https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4607.msg38909.html#msg38909
Bread flour for flour and vegetable (which I checked ingredients to find was Soybean) oil for oil.

For the sauce I used Jackie Tran's recipe here: https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=4452.msg412244#msg412244

 I don't know the 80s PH Pans as a point of reference, but it is delicious all the same. Baked for around 15 minutes at 470f in a pan, on a baking stone (oven had been preheated for 55 minutes) 1 rack higher than the middle of my oven. Initial room temperature ferment was about 2-2.5 hours - I wasn't sure how long to expect, so I periodically checked in on it until it had risen enough to fill out the pan. It then cold fermented for roughly 16 hours (7 30-ish PM Friday until 11 30am Saturday). I let the dough and sauce then rest at room temperature for an hour while the oven was preheating.

Had issues rolling it out into a circle (I wonder if it should be fully degassed?) so the surface was pretty uneven, but the fermenting helped that a lot it seems (still there's lots of dips and peaks in the dough surface, so something to work on for next time for sure). I was really stressed about getting it into a circle for pan-fermentation, was this necessary? Would it have filled out evenly as long as it was just in a vaguely oval/circle ship with a consistent thickness?

I think I used too much oil, so I will rein that in next time, I had to let the pizza rest on a big bundle of paper towels for a few minutes when pulling it out due to me worrying about having the oil envelop the entire bottom of the pan which I think would have happened when the dough expanded over time anyway. The sausage tasted a bit off, but that was just due to my choice in type/brand I think, so I'll have to look into what kinds of sausage are good for pizza toppings.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: MadMatt on August 04, 2018, 05:27:23 PM

^ Nice looking pizza how much oil did you use that's an important part in getting that crispy oily crust PH are known for



Is there any reason to let the dough rise twice?

In bread making it's supposed to give a finer gluten structure and smaller crumb according to a google search.


I've made plenty of one rise bread rolls and to be honest I don't notice much difference.



Just seems lot easier to  knead the dough, plop it in and let it rise once. 





I like doing my RT pizza and doing two rises seems a pain. I guess as I usually do  8 hour RT pizza's   I could find out how long 4 hours need and double it?
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: LeonP on August 04, 2018, 07:44:36 PM
I used around ... 4.4 ounces or so. I did 4, it didn't spread enough to cover my pan so I poured a bit more in and then dabbed some up with paper towels so I can't give a definitive figure  :-\

Only reason I did the 2nd RT portion was b/c I'm used to all of my doughs and sauces being baked not-cold and so it felt right to do it that way (possible mistake on my part?), I didn't personally think of this as a rise/proofing but more of a thawing out.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Sebastianvettel on September 04, 2018, 07:34:37 PM
Thanks for the recipes and information sharing in this thread.  It has been of great help for my dough and especially the preparation/shaping/fermentation of the dough. I am not completely sure if I got the right Flour because it is different in every country and I used the german Type 405 Flour which is roughly equal to the American All Purpose I'd imagine. The brand I use has increased protein count coming in at 12.8g per 100g. It was the highest I could find and sadly local stores don't have any flour that would be equal to the american bread flour and importing flour from the United States is too expensive.

Regardless of the flour difference I am somewhat happy about how the dough turns out, but I am not quite happy with the sauce and crust flavor. Lets start with the crust. I am not sure how to describe the Pizza Hut Pan Pizza crust flavor, I only had Pizza Hut once in the last 10 years and it probably differs a lot based on region. I imagine it tastes slightly different in the US/EU because they have to rely on regional products so my expectation of what a Pizza Hut pizza should taste like it is not the same as it is for other people.

I am pretty certain Pizza Hut uses oil on their crust to get that shiny look and have the crust be soft and easy to bite. I tried some garlic oil but it was not as flavorful as I hoped it would be. I think the Pizza Hut flavor might be somewhat more buttery? Correct me if I am mistaken, but if I had to guess I'd say they use garlic butter oil/spray on the crust. Not sure if you could substitute that with actual garlic butter which is heated so it becomes easy to spread on the crust and then baked. I might try that the next time or simply olive oil/soybean oil/sunflower oil. Any of those are still for me to be tested.

Secondly the sauce. I think getting the sauce right must be the hardest part of copying Pizza Chains. It seems that many pizza chains are using tomato paste (mixed with water) to get a base for the sauce + any combination of salt, sugar, oregano, basil, garlic powder, onion powder maybe even black pepper and celery salt depending on the pizza chain.
Whenever I try to make pizza sauce based on tomato paste I feel like it is too bitter even when I add sugar to it. I would love to know what tomato paste Pizza Hut is actually using in the US, because here most stores carry 3-times concentrated tomato paste which tastes extremely bitter. I would assume it is roughly the same. The stuff I buy has a dark red color. Even when mixed with water it is still much darker than normal tomato sauce you would make from fresh tomatoes or canned peeled tomato.

I am going to be experimenting a bit with it the next weeks/months and try to get closer to that Pizza Hut flavor I remember I got from that small pan Pizza back some 10-20 years ago. Sadly that Pizza Hut closed in my city leaving my city with 0 Pizza Hut stores so I could only get it when I travel.

Cheese is another thing to think about. Are they just using plain shredded mozzarella or do they add parmesan/provolone etc. to it aswell? Maybe they are spraying garlic butter oil aswell on the cheese. I might be going to Pizza Hut next week and I will make sure to try to find out the distinct flavors of cheese, sauce and crust and try to remember it when I try to reverse engineer it at home.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: PentiumIIPizza on March 25, 2019, 03:01:51 AM
Everyone seems to be using vegetable oil (soybean oil) in both dough and pan for this recipe, unfortunately soybean oil is not available in my country. I'm able to buy the following oils:

Corn oil
Sunflower oil
Rapeseed oil, refined (canola oil)


Can I use any of these instead?
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: PentiumIIPizza on March 28, 2019, 03:58:37 AM
At the store I found a product that was 74% canola oil and 23% butter. That sounded good to me as it would be great if the crust gets a buttery taste. Now I will see in a few days if it was a bad choice.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: IEatPizzaByThePie on March 30, 2019, 08:39:27 PM
If you cannot source vegetable (soybean) oil, the next best choice would be canola oil. It has similar cooking properties and a neutral flavor. Corn oil would be my second pick. It is popular among the Chicago crowd.

Shortening is another vegetable oil option, however, I tend not to use it much as it can produce an overly soft crust.

Olive oil is another good choice, but it will impart some flavor in the end result. Extra virgin olive oil, too, although it will contribute a very noticeable flavor and tends to brown the crust aggressively.

I hope that helps.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: MadMatt on March 31, 2019, 05:05:18 PM
Everyone seems to be using vegetable oil (soybean oil) in both dough and pan for this recipe, unfortunately soybean oil is not available in my country. I'm able to buy the following oils:

Corn oil
Sunflower oil
Rapeseed oil, refined (canola oil)


Can I use any of these instead?


Use rapeseed oil it should just be cheap regular cooking oil its what they use in our Pizza Hut pan pizza as well as others like Dominos.

Here in the UK the two common cheap cooking oil is vegetable oil   (rapeseed ingredient on the back of the label)        and sunflower oil

Rapeseed and canola oil is same thing as far as I can tell at least here in the UK.

Of course you can buy higher grade rapeseed oil I just use the cheap stuff I doubt theres anything quality about what they use in fast food joints.

Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: PentiumIIPizza on April 10, 2019, 03:50:16 AM
The information I have found regarding pizza and canola oil is somewhat contradictory. Some say it's completely neutral in flavor and others say that it has a weird taste they can't stand, and should not be used in pizza. Could it be that they used cold-pressed canola instead of refined?

Another thing is smoke point of the oils. Could that be a problem?

Canola, refined = 204°C (400°F)
Corn, refined = 232°C (450°F)

Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: julius_sanders on April 24, 2019, 06:33:28 PM
I have a question: you let it rise in the pan, then did the cold ferment? Or did I understand something wrong?
Thank you :)


Alright, I made the recipe and it turned out well I feel!

For the dough I used Pete-zza's revised formula here: https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4607.msg38909.html#msg38909
Bread flour for flour and vegetable (which I checked ingredients to find was Soybean) oil for oil.

For the sauce I used Jackie Tran's recipe here: https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=4452.msg412244#msg412244

 I don't know the 80s PH Pans as a point of reference, but it is delicious all the same. Baked for around 15 minutes at 470f in a pan, on a baking stone (oven had been preheated for 55 minutes) 1 rack higher than the middle of my oven. Initial room temperature ferment was about 2-2.5 hours - I wasn't sure how long to expect, so I periodically checked in on it until it had risen enough to fill out the pan. It then cold fermented for roughly 16 hours (7 30-ish PM Friday until 11 30am Saturday). I let the dough and sauce then rest at room temperature for an hour while the oven was preheating.

Had issues rolling it out into a circle (I wonder if it should be fully degassed?) so the surface was pretty uneven, but the fermenting helped that a lot it seems (still there's lots of dips and peaks in the dough surface, so something to work on for next time for sure). I was really stressed about getting it into a circle for pan-fermentation, was this necessary? Would it have filled out evenly as long as it was just in a vaguely oval/circle ship with a consistent thickness?

I think I used too much oil, so I will rein that in next time, I had to let the pizza rest on a big bundle of paper towels for a few minutes when pulling it out due to me worrying about having the oil envelop the entire bottom of the pan which I think would have happened when the dough expanded over time anyway. The sausage tasted a bit off, but that was just due to my choice in type/brand I think, so I'll have to look into what kinds of sausage are good for pizza toppings.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: julius_sanders on April 24, 2019, 06:37:49 PM
Which brand of flour did you found with such a high protein content?

If you are searching something stronger, I recommend you to order the caputo manitoba, which is still a little bit expensive but it is a high quality flour, and with his really high protein content of 14,5 % you can mix it with other flours :)

https://www.gustini.de/caputo-farina-tipo-0-manitoba.html?gclid=Cj0KCQjwkoDmBRCcARIsAG3xzl94nXjpus0gGMkHvPlbcL1pDNrAajOFpI3z_WcCi6V5ewFYGr2250IaApEfEALw_wcB

Thanks for the recipes and information sharing in this thread.  It has been of great help for my dough and especially the preparation/shaping/fermentation of the dough. I am not completely sure if I got the right Flour because it is different in every country and I used the german Type 405 Flour which is roughly equal to the American All Purpose I'd imagine. The brand I use has increased protein count coming in at 12.8g per 100g. It was the highest I could find and sadly local stores don't have any flour that would be equal to the american bread flour and importing flour from the United States is too expensive.

Regardless of the flour difference I am somewhat happy about how the dough turns out, but I am not quite happy with the sauce and crust flavor. Lets start with the crust. I am not sure how to describe the Pizza Hut Pan Pizza crust flavor, I only had Pizza Hut once in the last 10 years and it probably differs a lot based on region. I imagine it tastes slightly different in the US/EU because they have to rely on regional products so my expectation of what a Pizza Hut pizza should taste like it is not the same as it is for other people.

I am pretty certain Pizza Hut uses oil on their crust to get that shiny look and have the crust be soft and easy to bite. I tried some garlic oil but it was not as flavorful as I hoped it would be. I think the Pizza Hut flavor might be somewhat more buttery? Correct me if I am mistaken, but if I had to guess I'd say they use garlic butter oil/spray on the crust. Not sure if you could substitute that with actual garlic butter which is heated so it becomes easy to spread on the crust and then baked. I might try that the next time or simply olive oil/soybean oil/sunflower oil. Any of those are still for me to be tested.

Secondly the sauce. I think getting the sauce right must be the hardest part of copying Pizza Chains. It seems that many pizza chains are using tomato paste (mixed with water) to get a base for the sauce + any combination of salt, sugar, oregano, basil, garlic powder, onion powder maybe even black pepper and celery salt depending on the pizza chain.
Whenever I try to make pizza sauce based on tomato paste I feel like it is too bitter even when I add sugar to it. I would love to know what tomato paste Pizza Hut is actually using in the US, because here most stores carry 3-times concentrated tomato paste which tastes extremely bitter. I would assume it is roughly the same. The stuff I buy has a dark red color. Even when mixed with water it is still much darker than normal tomato sauce you would make from fresh tomatoes or canned peeled tomato.

I am going to be experimenting a bit with it the next weeks/months and try to get closer to that Pizza Hut flavor I remember I got from that small pan Pizza back some 10-20 years ago. Sadly that Pizza Hut closed in my city leaving my city with 0 Pizza Hut stores so I could only get it when I travel.

Cheese is another thing to think about. Are they just using plain shredded mozzarella or do they add parmesan/provolone etc. to it aswell? Maybe they are spraying garlic butter oil aswell on the cheese. I might be going to Pizza Hut next week and I will make sure to try to find out the distinct flavors of cheese, sauce and crust and try to remember it when I try to reverse engineer it at home.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: MadMatt on April 27, 2019, 04:48:28 AM
Making my first attempt tonight  though I weighed dough ball and it was 21.5oz instead of 22oz  it was actually 22oz before kneading  how do you lose .5 oz  from kneading by hand.   :-\


I had troubling rolling it out and the dough ended up flopping over itself so didn't quite get a perfect circle or thickness but lets hope it fills out in the pan ok. 



[edit] well this is gonna be a disaster  despite putting it in a warmer place than should need for the rise I don't think its spread out much, not hit the sides. I probably should have measured what size it was before putting it in there  probably  should have got it to 12.


Loads of oil found its way to the top.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: MadMatt on April 27, 2019, 01:09:48 PM
Well just got done eating it and


Tastes like fried bread with sauce and cheese on it tbh        my father enjoyed it but I didn't like it


Too much oil  its been a few years since I had pizza hut here in the uk but I'm sure it wasn't quite that oily.      1/2 cup for 14" right?     


The pizza was about 1 inch thick after baking   actually it didn't seem much thicker than the petezza papa johns recipe (about 20oz  vs 22oz from my memory)      but a bit lighter as it had more air from proofing in it and softer due to the huge amounts of oil soaked in the dough.


I question if its worth putting oil in the dough itself    all the oil in the bottom gets soaked up anyway.     



I only took a few pics


Bottom came out nicely


I baked about 190c in a fan oven on steel, which I preheated hotter     for 14-15 minutes.
I made all kinds of mistakes like rolling it out uneven,  I didn't roll it out nearly big enough so it never actually hit the sides without me stretching it a bit in the pan which in turn pushed the dough down on the oil making oil cover the top of the dough.


Pizza topping was blend of mozzarella and cheddar

spanish chorizo slices.. gone totally off them, need to find a good peppeorni in the UK (give me some suggestions)








I took some pics of the crumb but can't make out anything from all the red sauce and orangey grease  :-D
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: MadMatt on June 10, 2019, 06:10:40 PM
Anyone in the US tried the new improved pan pizza? I've seen various reviews of people hating it. I'm addicted to those youtube channels of people eating especially pizza. :D

Don't you hate when they improve things and make it worse.  ::)
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Jakew81 on June 10, 2019, 08:37:12 PM
Today I found myself at the Vet Clinic with my dog, in a strip mall, next door to a Pizza Hut.  Fancy signage about "back to the original pan pizza" or some such nonsense and "$7.99 if you order online". Suddenly I had decided what was going to be dinner.  I expected to be disappointed, but was hopeful that just maybe I would be transported back to the 1980's.  I did just treat my wife to the New Kids On The Block mixtape tour last night after all, and have been reminiscing on our youth all day.  I was not disappointed about being disappointed.  Toppings were the same as I remember from the last time I had a pizza hut pizza years ago. The crust however was seriously lacking in flavor.  Very little flavor at all.  Very very soft, no crunch, very little oil.  Didn't even taste any oil.  Isn't that the point?  The shape of the rim makes me think that a dough press was used to push the dough in to the pan. Decent airy structure but no crunch or chew.   It appears that the dough did proof in the pan, but the part that I found the most strange is that the pan the crust seems to have proofed in had ridges to delineate slices.  Every slice had a line on the bottom.  One it was ultimately not cut along.  Not great, but not terrible.  Also not worth a penny more than $7.99.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Carmine Abramo on June 13, 2019, 10:11:20 PM
Very very soft, no crunch, very little oil.  Didn't even taste any oil.  Isn't that the point?  The shape of the rim makes me think that a dough press was used to push the dough in to the pan. Decent airy structure but no crunch or chew.

It would be difficult to get any delivery or carryout pizza to retain crunch inside a pizza box for 15-30 min especially in the pan pizza genre.  That said I've tried the new formula.  It's an improvement over the doughy, dense crust they sold for nearly 2 decades.  I forget what the original of the 70's and 80's tasted like but this new pizza does remind me of a Jet's crust when eaten right out of the pan at a restaurant or reheated back there is noticeable crispy undercrust and a soft airy chew like an East coast sicilian pizza and as such, easier to eat than before.  The sauce is fresher and tangier than the past and the pizza is considerably less greasy most likely because of the move to a part skim mozzarella.  Also there is less oil and butter in the pan.  All in all, an improvement but probably won't last.

I'm also aware of inconsistency between PH chains, I visited a sit down restaurant so other people's pizza experiences may differ.

 





Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Jakew81 on June 14, 2019, 02:56:58 PM
It would be difficult to get any delivery or carryout pizza to retain crunch inside a pizza box for 15-30 min especially in the pan pizza genre. 


This pizza was in the box 5-7 minutes tops.  I was there when it came out and live just a couple blocks away.  This pizza was never crispy.  I haven't seen a sit down pizza hut in years.  Not an option near me as far as I know, however I wouldn't seek it out if it were.  I will say that I agree it is better than what they had before and after my initial review it did grow on me a little more. Made for pretty good cold leftovers the next day.  Yes the sauce is pretty flavorful and it's not the grease bomb Pizza Hut had been serving before. I would probably get it again now that I'm revisiting the experience. 
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Carmine Abramo on June 14, 2019, 04:25:26 PM
Video of a sit down pizza hut for anyone who's interested. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HggezEMhufY
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Carmine Abramo on June 14, 2019, 04:38:08 PM


This pizza was in the box 5-7 minutes tops.  I was there when it came out and live just a couple blocks away.  This pizza was never crispy.  I haven't seen a sit down pizza hut in years.  Not an option near me as far as I know, however I wouldn't seek it out if it were.  I will say that I agree it is better than what they had before and after my initial review it did grow on me a little more. Made for pretty good cold leftovers the next day.  Yes the sauce is pretty flavorful and it's not the grease bomb Pizza Hut had been serving before. I would probably get it again now that I'm revisiting the experience.

I see the odd slice perforation that you explained.  PH's vary widely between stores in terms of consistency, we all know that.  You could also ask for a more well done bake for a crispier crust as I believe light brown is the standard protocol and all that steam tends to soften the pizza considerably.  I took half my pie from the sit down restaurant home and it reheated really well later in the evening in the toaster oven and got a nice recrunch.   Agree about cold the next day, was pretty good for breakfast.  I'm not a big chain pizza fan, but will re order it and part of me has a soft spot for PH, was a big part of my childhood when it was great.  Their wings are pretty good as well, they're deep fried to order as opposed to baked and held in heat lamps which the other chains do.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Essen1 on June 14, 2019, 09:29:10 PM
Video of a sit down pizza hut for anyone who's interested. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HggezEMhufY

Quote
It’s definitely a hit!

Let’s change that quote to “It’s definitely garbage.”
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Carmine Abramo on June 15, 2019, 09:04:49 AM
Let’s change that quote to “It’s definitely garbage.”

With that attitude you just might hit your kickstarter goal!
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Chicago Bob on June 15, 2019, 09:49:28 PM
I'm gonna try one of these new retro pizzas.......as soon as they do the nice price $5.99 large.   :o
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Carmine Abramo on June 16, 2019, 11:00:20 PM
I'm gonna try one of these new retro pizzas.......as soon as they do the nice price $5.99 large.   :o

They're pretty good. 
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Carmine Abramo on June 16, 2019, 11:05:58 PM
They're pretty good.

In fact I'd bet if you blindfolded the top posters here on pizzamaking and made them a fresh pie right out of that pan at a sitdown and said it was made by a renowned pizzamaker they would be like, "AWESOME!!!!!!"

Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: MadMatt on July 05, 2019, 12:24:56 PM
Thought this might interest people..  a pizza hut that makes dough instore in New Zealand

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f9Slq2ck7xQ

1:30


Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: CarryOn on July 05, 2019, 12:57:51 PM
We have a sit-down PH about 20 minutes from us and we ate there recently.

Pizza was about like we remembered, but the experience was horrible. We walked in, Friday early evening, about 5:30PM, and no one was there. All the tables had the chairs up, and we thought maybe they weren't doing sit-down anymore, and just open for carry out.

We waited by the "Please Wait To Be Seated" for quite a while, until I noticed a girl in the way out front part cleaning. I asked if they were open and she said they were and to "just sit anywhere."

We did, and then, all through ordering and getting served and eating and paying, one mistake after another. Our appetizers arrived after our pizza. They charged us wrong. They refilled iced tea with pop. It was kind of hilariously bad, because we started guessing what they'd screw up next.

And the whole time, half the lights were turned off, vacuum cleaner was sitting in the middle of the floor, mop bucket sat out, chairs still up. Not very appealing at all.

We had a carry out PH closer, but Dominoes opened their own sit-down place just up the street, and now that PH is closed.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: loowaters on August 26, 2019, 10:09:58 AM
Had this pop up in recommended videos today couldn't see if it had been posted before. 

1988 pizza hut training video 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7HpCJov3Uj0


Really counting the pepperoni... 4:25

 ::)


I'm interested in that fairy dust at 6:24   

There's got to be a pan pizza instructional vid out there somewhere.  Get on it boys.

Loo
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: scott r on August 26, 2019, 01:18:14 PM
https://www.restaurantsupply.com/winco-aphs-7-6-75-22-pin-aluminum-non-stick-pizza-heat-sink?keyword=&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIsL6RqoSh5AIVxwOGCh0VDQxYEAQYAiABEgJYGfD_BwE
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Chicago Bob on August 26, 2019, 07:57:20 PM
https://www.restaurantsupply.com/winco-aphs-7-6-75-22-pin-aluminum-non-stick-pizza-heat-sink?keyword=&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIsL6RqoSh5AIVxwOGCh0VDQxYEAQYAiABEgJYGfD_BwE
what the hell gadget is that now Scott? 🤠
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: MadMatt on August 27, 2019, 01:45:30 PM
It looks like a very expensive pizza saver (the plastic white thing in the pizza box)

Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on August 27, 2019, 04:10:00 PM
what the hell gadget is that now Scott? 🤠
CB,

Maybe Scott will respond to your post but the link he posted explains the purpose of the heat sink, to wit:

Pizza heat sinks, like this, are designed to be placed in the center of the pizza as it bakes. They ensure even heat distribution, making for a faster, more consistent bake, without burnt edges or uncooked centers. This 22 pin pizza heat sink feature a non-stick coating to eliminate the threat of toppings sticking to it during baking or removal. With this pizza heat sink you can be sure your pizzas will come out of the oven quicker than those that not utilizing a heat sink.

For a visual explanation, see the photos at:

https://www.webstaurantstore.com/6-5-8-22-pin-aluminum-non-stick-pizza-heat-sink/407APHS7.html

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: scott r on August 27, 2019, 07:58:56 PM
its the secret to Priazzo... never knew about this until I watched that training video.  Priazzo is long gone but these are still made.   Very cool.   
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Chicago Bob on August 27, 2019, 08:00:06 PM
CB,

Maybe Scott will respond to your post but the link he posted explains the purpose of the heat sink, to wit:

Pizza heat sinks, like this, are designed to be placed in the center of the pizza as it bakes. They ensure even heat distribution, making for a faster, more consistent bake, without burnt edges or uncooked centers. This 22 pin pizza heat sink feature a non-stick coating to eliminate the threat of toppings sticking to it during baking or removal. With this pizza heat sink you can be sure your pizzas will come out of the oven quicker than those that not utilizing a heat sink.

For a visual explanation, see the photos at:

https://www.webstaurantstore.com/6-5-8-22-pin-aluminum-non-stick-pizza-heat-sink/407APHS7.html

Peter

   Do you think it works Peter?

 Sounds like a cure for weaker home oven that some folks struggle with getting the center part of the pie to cook more completely...
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on August 27, 2019, 08:30:44 PM
   Do you think it works Peter?

 Sounds like a cure for weaker home oven that some folks struggle with getting the center part of the pie to cook more completely...
Bob,

I wrote about the use of heat sinks a few times over the years but it was mainly with respect to the Pizza Hut Priazzo pizza that Scott mentioned that I became aware of the fact that Pizza Hut used the heat sinks for that type of pizza. See, for example, Reply 34 at:

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=1632.msg55257#msg55257

The links in the above post do not work anymore but the heat sinks that PH used look to be identical to the one referenced in Scott's post and in the webstaurantstore.com website that I referenced in my last post. You will also note that I had my doubts about home pizza makers springing for heat sinks to use in a home setting. When I did a search today for heat sinks, I found better than a half dozen places that sell them, at prices ranging from around $20 to over $40, all for the identical APHS-7 heat sink made by Winco. I suppose a home pizza maker would have to want to make pan pizzas often to warrant springing for a heat sink. Offhand, I can only recall one member who had a heat sink, and we briefly discussed that at:

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=6954.msg59724#msg59724

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Chicago Bob on August 27, 2019, 08:34:18 PM
Thank you. 🧐
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: hotsawce on November 28, 2019, 10:43:41 PM
A lot of the pan pizzas in this thread look excellent - light, fuffy, and crispy.

I made a batch at 55% water and 4% oil, baking at 500 on the lower center rack for about 17 minutes (seemed long...) My pizza was more like cooked angel food cake than the light, fluffy pizza hut pan pizza. Any tips? I was thinking of baking at 550 instead.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: scott r on November 28, 2019, 10:56:28 PM
Heat sink=fantasic. pizza freaks=forever... happy thanksgiving all!!
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: pizza_newbie on December 28, 2019, 01:05:09 PM
How would I make this using a food processor? https://www.pizzamaking.com/panpizza.php
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: pizza_newbie on January 01, 2020, 12:00:55 PM
Following the Pizza Hut recipe on the site, I let the dough proof overnight and currently it’s risen to about 1.25” in my 14” pan.  In the recipe it says to let it rise to 1.5” but even at 1.25” it already seems really high to me.  My concern is that when this bakes won’t it rise even further? I feel like that will be way too high... Pizza Hut pan pizzas aren’t thaaat high are they?
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: IEatPizzaByThePie on January 02, 2020, 12:14:55 PM
Following the Pizza Hut recipe on the site, I let the dough proof overnight and currently it’s risen to about 1.25” in my 14” pan.  In the recipe it says to let it rise to 1.5” but even at 1.25” it already seems really high to me.  My concern is that when this bakes won’t it rise even further? I feel like that will be way too high... Pizza Hut pan pizzas aren’t thaaat high are they?

That doesn't look over-proofed to me. You also must remember that your dough will be weighed down by the sauce/cheese/toppings during the bake.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: MadMatt on January 02, 2020, 12:38:19 PM
I never use the instructions because they made no sense to me

My dough is well proofed and never reached anywhere near that height


Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: pizza_newbie on January 08, 2020, 08:31:41 AM
That doesn't look over-proofed to me. You also must remember that your dough will be weighed down by the sauce/cheese/toppings during the bake.

Unfortunately it was still too thick even after putting on all the toppings during the bake.  I measured the final height and it was close to 1.5” - much thicker than Pizza Hut.  The toppings didn’t do much to weigh it down.  My whole family felt the same that the pizza was too thick and way too dense.  It didn’t have any nice air pockets inside.  Dunno what I did wrong.  I’ve attached pictures to show.

Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: pizza_newbie on January 08, 2020, 08:33:35 AM
I never use the instructions because they made no sense to me

My dough is well proofed and never reached anywhere near that height

What recipe did you follow?
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: HansB on January 08, 2020, 08:36:10 AM
It didn’t have any nice air pockets inside.  Dunno what I did wrong. 

Yours is an easy fix. Just use a lower dough ball weight/quantity.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: pizza_newbie on January 08, 2020, 10:04:21 AM
Your is an easy fix. Just use a lower dough ball weight/quantity.

Ya I’d probably split it evenly into two dough balls. But what about the lack of air bubbles?
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: scott r on January 08, 2020, 10:32:46 AM
My whole family felt the same that the pizza was too thick and way too dense.  It didn’t have any nice air pockets inside.  Dunno what I did wrong.

this is either under or over proofing or it could possibly be over mixing. In another post of yours I noticed that you might be using a food processor to mix.  If so, make sure to take the temperature of your dough and dont let it go above 75 degrees. Still though, under/over proofing is the most common problem I see when learning to make pizza. 

I think the problem with your dough ball being too large could be that you should be using a scale and that the recipe on the first page of this thread doesnt use a scale.  Baking needs very precise measurements and without a scale your results will be different every time you make the recipe.  Dont give up, be precise, experiment and take notes. Good luck!
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: MadMatt on January 08, 2020, 11:33:45 AM
What recipe did you follow?

I only make room temp doughs     and use the Baker's yeast quantity prediction model  as a guide   though use slightly more with the pan proofed pizza than I do with my regular doughs https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=26831.0

Knead dough,   shape it in ball. Give it a few mins rest and I already begin to roll it out to size.

It takes awhile to stretch it to size as the doughs just been kneaded and isn't fermented at all so I just give it a bit of a rest then come back and stretch it so more.


I use the dough calculator with thickness factor of around 0.15




I saw a Pizza Hut new zealand video and they seemed to do what I do, except use one of those machines to shape dough quickly they then put shaped dough in the pan with oil and let it rise chilled.


Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: pizza_newbie on January 09, 2020, 01:04:00 PM
this is either under or over proofing or it could possibly be over mixing. In another post of yours I noticed that you might be using a food processor to mix.  If so, make sure to take the temperature of your dough and dont let it go above 75 degrees. Still though, under/over proofing is the most common problem I see when learning to make pizza. 

I think the problem with your dough ball being too large could be that you should be using a scale and that the recipe on the first page of this thread doesnt use a scale.  Baking needs very precise measurements and without a scale your results will be different every time you make the recipe.  Dont give up, be precise, experiment and take notes. Good luck!

I know the temperature of the dough was at least 95 degrees when I measured it.  This happened because when I tried kneading everything in the food processor it was way too much dough for the food processor to handle.  The whole machine started shaking violently and jumping around the table.  I own a good quality breville 16 cup food processor.  So I had to split the dough into three parts and knead them separately part by part.  Each time the dough was quite sticky so I had to add more flour and turn on the machine again.  I probably left it running for too long.

As for measuring the ingredients using a scale, I did that.  I didn’t look at the recipe on the first page of this thread though.  I instead used this one https://www.pizzamaking.com/panpizza.php which I think is the same as the one on the first page of this thread but also lists how many grams to use for each ingredient, which I weighed using my scale.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pizzalord69420 on January 27, 2020, 04:54:33 PM
Made this recipe a few times now.  I LOVE IT.  Although I dont love pizza hut pan pizza because of the greasiness.  What I love about it is you can control how much oil you use.  I always leave it overnight or it's less desirable results.  And this one in particular was way too much dough because I used a smaller pan.  I honestly smoosh the dough down to a quarter of an inch and that is more than enough. 
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Lazaro on March 30, 2020, 04:28:55 PM
This is  my pan pizza and was very.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: pizza_newbie on April 01, 2020, 02:03:41 PM
Made this recipe a few times now.  I LOVE IT.  Although I dont love pizza hut pan pizza because of the greasiness.  What I love about it is you can control how much oil you use.  I always leave it overnight or it's less desirable results.  And this one in particular was way too much dough because I used a smaller pan.  I honestly smoosh the dough down to a quarter of an inch and that is more than enough.

Wow those air pockets are impressive.  Did you use a food processor to knead the dough?  I did and it didn’t turn out well.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: soulpatch on April 05, 2020, 04:47:43 PM
Want to duplicate the pizza hut crust, but with everything going on making a run to the grocery store isn't quite as simple as it used to be.  Has anybody substituted Diastatic powder in place of the powdered milk?  I know the milk breaks down the acids and is used to help brown the crust.  But wouldn't the dry malt do most of the same? 
SP
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: pizza_newbie on April 05, 2020, 10:56:20 PM
Made this recipe a few times now.  I LOVE IT.  Although I dont love pizza hut pan pizza because of the greasiness.  What I love about it is you can control how much oil you use.  I always leave it overnight or it's less desirable results.  And this one in particular was way too much dough because I used a smaller pan.  I honestly smoosh the dough down to a quarter of an inch and that is more than enough.

Also,  did you find that there was too much dough?  I followed the recipe exactly and used all the dough and consequently, my pizza turned out too thick if you see my pics.  Did you use entire dough from the recipe to make a single pizza?  If not, how much dough did you end up using?
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Chicago Bob on April 06, 2020, 11:08:46 PM
Want to duplicate the pizza hut crust, but with everything going on making a run to the grocery store isn't quite as simple as it used to be.  Has anybody substituted Diastatic powder in place of the powdered milk?  I know the milk breaks down the acids and is used to help brown the crust.  But wouldn't the dry malt do most of the same? 
SP

  Jus add a lil more sugar dude.... Don't sweat the small stuff.   ;)

It is so small.....🙈🍸
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: ViperZ on May 03, 2020, 06:34:18 PM
We tried this recipe and have to say it worked like a charm!  It was very similar to the Pizza Hut crust.  I made it in my wood fired Nono Pepe oven, and used the pizza tin to sheild the top as it cooked.  It took about 15 mins at 600F.  Thanks for all the tips, All!
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: wvmatt on May 04, 2020, 01:10:57 PM
Here is my 2nd attempt at the Pizza Hut pan pizza from this weekend.

Thank you everyone for all of the valuable recipes and information!

I have tried scaling the size back a little ... this is in a 14" pan.  I did substitute the powdered milk with diastatic malt both times, and let it cold ferment overnight, then proof in the pan for a few hours.  This one also had some Hormel bold cupping pepperoni my mother-in-law found at the grocery store ... it was also very good!  I may scale the size back just a little more for the next one, still pretty thick!!!
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: nlavon on May 10, 2020, 02:15:34 PM
I plan on making the Pizza Hut Pan Pizza as discussed here (the recipe by "xPHmgr" calling for 22.5 oz of flour). I plan to scale it down to a 10-inch pan and did the Baker's Percentage calculations, so I'm set to go as far as scaling ingredients are concerned. But one thing in the directions has me a little puzzled.

After the dough has been in the refrigerator for 4-24 hours, the directions say: "WHEN READY TO MAKE: Preheat oven to 500 °F for about 30-45 minutes. Remove dough from the refrigerator and add sauce, cheese, and toppings. Bake at 500 °F on a pizza stone for 14 minutes."

Reading that literally, it says to take the dough out of the refrigerator and put it straight on the baking stone. Almost everything I have read here about using refrigerated dough calls for the dough to return to room temperature before baking. Is that a given in this situation? Or is the dough in the pan really just popped into the oven straight from the refrigerator?

Thanks!
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Ian J on June 23, 2020, 12:48:28 PM
Can someone please post a link to the latest & greatest Pizza Hut pan pizza recipe.

I tried the one on the front page a long while ago but there was far too much dough, if that's the recipe of choice though I'm fine scaling it.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: matermark on June 23, 2020, 01:56:48 PM
I wonder if the 22/23 ounce flour should be finished ball weight... or just scale down to 23oz? It should not be as thick as some posted here. I can't access bakers % now that I'm typing something but I'd assume a large pan pizza should be in the 22 to 26 oz range. That should still give a pizza about an inch thick after letting it rise to fill the pan... or as close as possible to the edge...
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: cpitchford on September 28, 2020, 07:06:18 AM
I'm struggling to find baker's non-fat dry milk here in UK so I've been thinking of what I might be able to do instead.

I thought about using fresh skimmed/non-fat milk and heat treating by boiling, but I'm worried about the adjustments to the water in the recipe.

I'm wondering if taking some of the water in the recipe, mixing it with regular non-fat dry milk, could then be boiled to create the same heat-treated milk result with less worry about the water quantities:

I think my process would be:

1) Take dry milk powder
2) Take some water from recipe
4) weigh mixture
3) boil for some time
5) re-weigh mixture
6) add more water that was removed by boiling up to the original weight

I guess bottom line, is boiled reconstituted regular non-fat dry milk the same as bakers non-fat dry milk (mixed with water)?
 
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: HansB on September 28, 2020, 07:50:56 AM
FWIW, I use regular,(not heat-treated) dry milk powder in my Shokupan bread and buns, it works fine.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: matermark on September 28, 2020, 10:52:13 AM
I'm struggling to find baker's non-fat dry milk here in UK so I've been thinking of what I might be able to do instead.

I thought about using fresh skimmed/non-fat milk and heat treating by boiling, but I'm worried about the adjustments to the water in the recipe.

I'm wondering if taking some of the water in the recipe, mixing it with regular non-fat dry milk, could then be boiled to create the same heat-treated milk result with less worry about the water quantities:

I think my process would be:

1) Take dry milk powder
2) Take some water from recipe
4) weigh mixture
3) boil for some time
5) re-weigh mixture
6) add more water that was removed by boiling up to the original weight

I guess bottom line, is boiled reconstituted regular non-fat dry milk the same as bakers non-fat dry milk (mixed with water)?

Just use the non-fat dry milk powder that you have without any boiling or any extra steps...
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: MadMatt on September 28, 2020, 02:32:03 PM
I can't say I could tell a huge difference from the dough with or without the milk powder    as its cooked in a load of oil you tend to taste that more
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Ian on January 10, 2021, 11:40:00 AM
Hi folks, so I'm suddenly nostalgic for PH Pan but, holy cow, I'm so confused with which recipe and approach is considered the current favourite! Is there anything resembling consensus as to the best dough formula and whether the proof should be room or fridge temp? Thanks
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Ian on January 17, 2021, 11:50:32 AM
Hi folks, so I'm suddenly nostalgic for PH Pan but, holy cow, I'm so confused with which recipe and approach is considered the current favourite! Is there anything resembling consensus as to the best dough formula and whether the proof should be room or fridge temp? Thanks

Yeah, never mind. I shifted my attention to DSP. thanks
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: matermark on January 17, 2021, 04:52:10 PM
DSP???
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on January 17, 2021, 05:38:59 PM
DSP???
matermark,

I assume you are wondering what DSP means  ;D. If so, you may want to check out the thread at:

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=20056.msg196875#msg196875

Peter
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: matermark on January 18, 2021, 04:29:33 AM
I can't believe I drew a blank! I must be working too hard! I have been making Detroit style nearly weekly for the last couple months! Thanks! :chef: :-[
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Booty156 on February 13, 2021, 03:38:10 PM
Hey guys,

Made this pizza tonight, was insane!

I used Pete-ZZa's quantities, mixed with xPHMgr's directions.

For the dough I used Pete-ZZa's revised formula here: https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,4607.msg38909.html#msg38909

For the sauce I used Jackie Tran's recipe here: https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=4452.msg412244#msg412244

About 6-7 hours rest at room temp (15-16c) until pizza doubled and fit into pan. About 17hrs in the fridge from that

I believe that my oven isn't true to temp. Cooked at 210c with fan for 14mins. Actual temp was prolly around 230c-240c.

The Crust was crispy and the about 2 inches of the outer area of the base was crispy. The rest was just cooked (not soggy!) but not crispy. I cooked on a small 9 ish inches pizza stone. Oven was preheated for about an hour before. Dough came up to RT in this time.

What is my issue? Could it be the oven temp, or the small stone? Would I benefit from a pizza steel?

Thanks
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: matermark on February 13, 2021, 04:08:47 PM
 :chef:Just a couple/few questions:

How many inches diameter is the pan?
Did you spread the oil around the pan just before you put the dough ball in it?
How many ounces (oz) or Tablespoons (Tbs) of oil did you use for that size pan?
Which oven rack did you bake it on, top? center? bottom? or the oven floor?

Sorry, my brain still doesn't think in metric units yet!
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Booty156 on February 13, 2021, 05:01:28 PM
14
Spread like half a cup of oil around on bottom. Covered the whole pan and sides
Oven has only 4 racks. Cooked on top centre. 2nd from top
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: matermark on February 13, 2021, 10:21:26 PM
I would try a steel or a stone at least the size of your biggest pan you'll ever use. And set the oven to at least 230C. Buy a thermometer that hangs off a rack and put it on the 2nd rack from the bottom. Shoot for 475F.

Try moving it to the 2nd rack from the bottom. Use a spatula and check the bottom before removing and if still not done to your liking move the pan to the bottom rack, or even the oven floor if a gas oven, to finish it off...

Hope this helps.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Booty156 on February 14, 2021, 12:06:37 AM
I would try a steel or a stone at least the size of your biggest pan you'll ever use. And set the oven to at least 230C. Buy a thermometer that hangs off a rack and put it on the 2nd rack from the bottom. Shoot for 475F.

Try moving it to the 2nd rack from the bottom. Use a spatula and check the bottom before removing and if still not done to your liking move the pan to the bottom rack, or even the oven floor if a gas oven, to finish it off...

Hope this helps.


Thank you I will try that. Just ordered an oven thermometer.

With the oil, do I need that amount on the pan. There was an awful lot. And a lot left over after cooking. Some was soaked up with paper when spreading.

Recipe said " 1/2 cup (4 ounces) of vegetable oil to a 14" pan style pizza pan" For the original quantity
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Booty156 on February 17, 2021, 10:42:26 PM
I would try a steel or a stone at least the size of your biggest pan you'll ever use. And set the oven to at least 230C. Buy a thermometer that hangs off a rack and put it on the 2nd rack from the bottom. Shoot for 475F.

Try moving it to the 2nd rack from the bottom. Use a spatula and check the bottom before removing and if still not done to your liking move the pan to the bottom rack, or even the oven floor if a gas oven, to finish it off...

Hope this helps.

Got a thermometer the other day. From cooking at 160c and 200c the oven runs true to temp. At least at those temps. Just made some dough. Will try to aim for around 475f tomorrow.

Also made a 9 inch version in my cast iron pan. Will see if the size of the stone was the issue
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Holmes1612 on February 22, 2021, 04:40:26 AM
Hi,

Have perused this site for weeks but can't find a definitive answer, but I am complete boobies.

Can I use caputo 00 "pizzeria" flour for deep pan??

Thanks in advance.
Holmes1612
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Holmes1612 on February 22, 2021, 04:42:14 AM
Typical. My first post and my autocorrect changes noobie to boobies!! 🤣🤣
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: matermark on February 22, 2021, 11:21:25 AM
Hi,

Have perused this site for weeks but can't find a definitive answer, but I am complete boobies.

Can I use caputo 00 "pizzeria" flour for deep pan??

Thanks in advance.
Holmes1612
Sorry, I never have used Caputo 00 mostly because I read it's best for wood-fired pizza baking over 750F (sorry, I don't do Celsius either.) 
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: matermark on February 22, 2021, 11:22:56 AM
Typical. My first post and my autocorrect changes noobie to boobies!! 🤣🤣
I prefer boobies to noobies ANYDAY, so I forgive you!
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: hollandercooper on February 22, 2021, 12:57:52 PM
Tried this out, and it turned out good! The sauce tasted JUST like Pizza Hut, but overall it felt... slightly too good? I guess? Not greasy enough?
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: CDoggyDog on February 22, 2021, 06:40:22 PM
Heres a catalogue that has the ingredients for pizza huts menu circa 2010 https://www.yumpu.com/en/document/read/3442069/pizza-hut-ingredient-listing-pizza-hut-canada

Has anyone made a recipe accounting for the odd ingredients? Few ingredients like the DATEM, ascorbic acid, and monoglycerides change the structure and texture of the dough. other ingredients help raise the dough and affect the taste. Also, I've heard PH uses brown sugar, has anyone tried that and noticed a difference?
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Holmes1612 on March 13, 2021, 08:58:43 AM
Hi,

based on pete's reduced dough formulas, for a 10" pizza would it be: 22oz/14 = 1.57 x 10 = 15.7/ or basically 16oz? If so does this look correct?

Flour(100%)   277.2
Water(55.55%)   153.9           
Active Dry Yeast (1.18%)   3.27
Diamond Crystal Kosher Salt (0.87%)   2.41
Baker's Non-Fat Dry Milk (2.35%)   6.51
Sugar (1.87%)   5.18
Vegetable (Soybean) Oil (4.27%)   11.84
Total (166.09%)   460.4       

Thanks in advance.
Tony.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pete-zza on March 13, 2021, 02:58:11 PM
Tony,

I assume you are referring to the dough formulation that I set forth for a 14" pizza at Reply 6 at:

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=4607.msg38909#msg38909

If the above is correct, the thickness factor for the dough in Reply 6 is 22 oz./(3.14159 x 7 x 7) = 0.14291. Applying that thickness factor to a 10" pizza gives us a dough weight of 3.14159 x 5 x 5 x 0.14291 = 11.22 ounces. Another way to calculate the dough ball weight for a 10" pizza is [(5 x 5)/(7 x 7)] x 22 = 11.22. You will note that for a 14" dough, the dough ball weight would be 16 ounces, as noted in Reply 12 at:

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=4607.msg62351#msg62351

If my premise is wrong, please let me know.

Peter



Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pavoni on April 23, 2021, 08:08:20 AM
I recently acquired an authentic (UK) 10" PH "Pan" pizza pan circa late '90s. Noticed there are two concentric rings within the inner wall of the pan, I believe I once read somewhere that the lower one was to indicate the intial dough level with the upper ring indicating correct rise after proofing? I've measured these with a vernier caliper for reference, apologies for mixing imperial and metric ;):

Outer pan diameter: 11"
Inner pan diameter: 10"
Wall height: 37mm
Lower ring from base: 20mm
Distance between rings: 6mm
Upper ring from base: 26mm
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: Pavoni on April 23, 2021, 09:06:18 AM
Plugged the data from Pete-zza's updated recipe from reply #6 and the 10" thickness factor 0.14291 from reply #462 into https://pizza-dough-calculator.herokuapp.com/calculator (could only work with whole numbers on the web version so used the mobile version which permitted additional decimals).

Taking my measurements from the 10" PH pan from reply #463, converted to metric (round, deep dish, 2.6cm rise, sloped sides: bottom dia: 25.4cm, top dia: 27.9cm, depth: 3.7cm).

Gave me the following:

Flour: 100% - 272.6g
Hydration: 55.5% - 151.3g
Yeast: 1.18% (ADY) - 3.2g
Salt: 0.875% - 2.3g
Dry milk: 2.35% - 6.4g
Oil: 4.27% - 11.6g
Sugar: 1.875% - 5.1g

Total: (166%/TF 0.43) - 452.75g

Will attempt later. Many thanks to xPHmgr all those years ago and Pete-zza for their input!
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: karenburton1305 on June 28, 2021, 09:35:58 AM
All of the photos on here look like the real deal!!! I've never managed to make pizza dough from scratch at home - I usually use a wrap as the base!

Anyone got an idea of how to do the pizza hut pan pizza with cheese in the crust? Like this one (https://www.pizzahut.co.uk/restaurants/food/pizza/hot-n-spicy-chicken2/) - I'm worried about overstuffing the cheese and ruining my oven ahahaha!  :chef:
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: matermark on June 28, 2021, 11:29:12 AM
I use string cheese mozzarella. Just wrap the dough around it. You can also cut your own "strings" off a piece of mozzarella.

Hope this helps.
Title: Re: Pizza Hut Pan Pizza
Post by: OzPizza on October 02, 2021, 01:44:43 AM
I stepped away from my usual NY Style pizzas the other day to make some pan pizzas for a chance. It's been quite awhile since I last did them. Using the recommended recipe I must say I was really impressed with the results. Makes you reflect somewhat on how Pizza Hut around the globe seems to screw up the taste of this fundamentally basic recipe these days. I remember it being this tasty as kid. With that said they weren't here in Aus whenever I came back and ate as the cheese they used back in the 80's in Aus always tasted disgustingly wrong and sour to me compared to the US version I also ate quite a lot of back then (when I wasn't chowing down on far better local pizzas in the northern suburbs outside NYC ;D). I also went to the effort of making sure I sourced some proper baker's nonfat milk powder, something that isn't off the shelf available locally, despite Bob's Red Mill's products being fairly well supported here generally speaking. For sauce I followed Jackie Tran's recipe with the exception of not being able to source dried Marjoram anywhere for some reason. I used a combo of the imported Fior di latta I use with my NY Style and a locally available shredded Mozz, tried at different ratios from 20%-50% all with good results. The examples here are one of the uncooked pies and one of the best ones once I'd dialed in temps correctly in my Rollergrill oven which tends to cook a little more intensely despite measuring bang on 500F with laser thermometer. I've got it in mind start using my Weber digital ambient temp probe which I've used with BBQ smokers and cooking for years and would recommend that as per sites like Meathead Goldwyn's do over any mechanical oven shelf thermometer say.