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Author Topic: Help! Chuck E Cheese copycat recipe  (Read 334 times)

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Offline nightdasher

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Help! Chuck E Cheese copycat recipe
« on: May 28, 2021, 07:12:28 PM »
I would like to develop a copycat recipe of Chuck E Cheese's pizza. I have no experience with formulating dough. I have made lots of batches of dough from premix as a part of my job but that's as far as my experience goes. Can anyone help me with this? I would definitely love to learn more about the science of dough.

Offline Detmsp

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Re: Help! Chuck E Cheese copycat recipe
« Reply #1 on: May 28, 2021, 07:35:28 PM »
Sorry, I'm not the one to help.... but I'm curious about why Chuck E Cheese? Is there pizza good? I don't think I've had it since I was maybe 10 years old!

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Help! Chuck E Cheese copycat recipe
« Reply #2 on: May 28, 2021, 08:14:59 PM »
I would like to develop a copycat recipe of Chuck E Cheese's pizza. I have no experience with formulating dough. I have made lots of batches of dough from premix as a part of my job but that's as far as my experience goes. Can anyone help me with this? I would definitely love to learn more about the science of dough.
nightdasher,

You did not indicate what Chuck R Cheese pizza you are interested in replicating, but you can see their ingredients statements for several of their pizzas at:

https://www.chuckecheese.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/chuck-e-ingredient-statements.pdf

What sticks out to me is the use of both yeast and chemical leavening agents such as Sodium Acid Pyrophosphate (SAPP) and Monocalcium Phosphate (MCP). Another common chemical leavening agent is sodium aluminum phosphate (SALP). I mention that one because I discussed its use in the CHEMICAL LEAVENING SYSTEMS entry in the forum's Pizza Glossary at:

https://www.pizzamaking.com/glossary.html#index_c

If you read the above entry, you will see how chemical leavening agents work along with yeast. I don't have any idea as to whether Chuck E Cheese makes its doughs at its stores, which would be simple to do, but it is also possible that the doughs are made in commissaries and delivered to the stores.

Unfortunately, it is not possible from the Chuck E Cheese ingredients statements to tell how much of each of the ingredients after the 2% statement are used. Under the FDA rules and regulations, ingredients statements are required to have the ingredients stated in the order of predominance by weight. But those rules and regulations do not apply to the ingredients listed after the less that 2% statement.

As for the calcium phosphate in the Chuck E Cheese ingredients statements, that is typically used in baking powders. So, it is possible that Chuck E Cheese is using a baking powder in addition to the leavening agents mentioned above (SAPP and MCP). Maybe it is a double acting baking powder.

To get more information on some of the ingredients I did not mention, such as dextrose and whey, you can look them up in this document:

https://www.vrg.org/ingredients/index.php#a

Dairy whey is also covered in the forumís Pizza Glossary at:

https://www.pizzamaking.com/glossary.html#index_d

Were I to speculate on the flour used, I would say a bleached all purpose flour. If it were bromated, or if it contained a substitute such as ascorbic acid (Vitamin C), those ingredients would have to be disclosed. They were not.

I also suspect that the semolina flour is used as bench flour when the dough is prepared for baking, or possibly during sheeting if that method is used.

Additional information may also be obtained from the Chuck E Cheese nutrition at:

https://www.chuckecheesejo.com/docs/default-source/nutrition-allergens-documents/calories-march-20186f2a.pdf?sfvrsn=67d52126_2

No doubt, there are also videos that relate to what Chuck E Cheese does in making its doughs and pizzas. It would also help to know the sizes of the pizzas it makes, which I couldnít find in a search I conducted today.

Good luck.

Peter

Offline Trinity

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Re: Help! Chuck E Cheese copycat recipe
« Reply #3 on: May 29, 2021, 05:50:01 AM »
:pizza:
It's an Earth food. They are called Swedish meatballs. It's a strange thing, but every sentient race has its own version of these Swedish meatballs! I suspect it's one of those great universal mysteries which will either never be explained, or which would drive you mad if you ever learned the truth.

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Help! Chuck E Cheese copycat recipe
« Reply #4 on: May 29, 2021, 12:59:57 PM »
Trin,

Thank you for the YouTube video. I had wondered where the soybean oil was used in the dough. I thought that it might have been encapsulated to prevent spoilage and included in the bag of flour used to make the pizzas. But it looks like the soybean oil is spread on the rims of baked pizzas.

It was also interesting to see that a dough docker is used with at least one of the pizza doughs used by Chuck E Cheese.

Peter

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Online Pete-zza

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Re: Help! Chuck E Cheese copycat recipe
« Reply #5 on: May 29, 2021, 01:23:39 PM »
Following up on Trin's post, I decided to look for another YouTube video featuring Chuck E Cheese and how their pizzas are made. I found one and have shown it below. The part of the video that covers the pizza making starts at about 2:50. That video confirms that the skins for at least one of their pizzas are sheeted. I suspect that the semolina flour may be involved somewhere in the sheeting step, to facilitate the sheeting without the dough sticking to the equipment. I still don't know why soy flour is used even though it is not novel with Chuck E Cheese.

Seeing the bag of flour in the video with all of the ingredients listed (and said to be proprietary right on the bag), I wondered whether I could find a photo of the bag itself with all of the proprietary information shown. Somehow I got lucky with my search and found a photo, which is also shown below even though it doesn't tell us anything new other than the weight of the ingredients in the bag. It also tells us that the semolina is not part of the dough itself.

We also now know that the doughs are made in the stores, that the water used to make the dough is 80F (presumably to get the desired finished dough temperature), that the ratio of water to premix is 50/50 (if I heard that correctly), the cold fermentation window (one day), and the bake temperature (around 500-550F, in an air impingement oven). And as best I can tell, Chuck E Cheese is using a double acting baking powder, but without the cornstarch. It would be like the Calumet and Fleischmann's double acting baking powders as shown at:

https://www.kraftheinz-foodservice.com/product/10043000845810/Calumet-Double-Action-Baking-Powder-6-ct-Casepack-5-lb-Canisters

and at:

https://cdn.thomasnet.com/ccp/10020857/79305.pdf

And here are the video and the photo of the bag.




Offline Pizza Shark

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Re: Help! Chuck E Cheese copycat recipe
« Reply #6 on: June 01, 2021, 07:38:37 PM »
I would like to develop a copycat recipe of Chuck E Cheese's pizza. I have no experience with formulating dough. I have made lots of batches of dough from premix as a part of my job but that's as far as my experience goes. Can anyone help me with this? I would definitely love to learn more about the science of dough.

You got to be joking.  There's a reason CEC is about bankrupt today and almost every franchisee who bought into that mess is outta business.  In the entire restaurant industry (and even narrowing it down to the pizza segment) the absolute worst place to end up employed was a CEC... Little kids running, vomiting on the floor everywhere during their supercharged pizza parties courtesy of PEPSI or COKE.  What a mess.  Buy a cheap self rising pie out of the freezer section of your grocery store and you'll get pretty close in my opinion although others here may differ.
       

Offline jsaras

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Re: Help! Chuck E Cheese copycat recipe
« Reply #7 on: June 02, 2021, 12:23:05 AM »
I couldnít get past the smell of diapers in that place
Things have never been more like today than they are right now.

Offline nightdasher

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Re: Help! Chuck E Cheese copycat recipe
« Reply #8 on: June 02, 2021, 11:54:50 PM »
You got to be joking.  There's a reason CEC is about bankrupt today and almost every franchisee who bought into that mess is outta business.  In the entire restaurant industry (and even narrowing it down to the pizza segment) the absolute worst place to end up employed was a CEC... Little kids running, vomiting on the floor everywhere during their supercharged pizza parties courtesy of PEPSI or COKE.  What a mess.  Buy a cheap self rising pie out of the freezer section of your grocery store and you'll get pretty close in my opinion although others here may differ.
     

Lol a bit harsh there. I quite enjoy Chuck E Cheese. I think their pizza is some of the best I've personally had from a chain. I think most people haven't been to CEC since they were kids or since they took their own kids. I order it delivered quite often. I was actually offered a management position at my local store, but I decided to stay at my current pizza place, even though the pay isn't as good.

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