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Author Topic: Help with blooming yeast  (Read 295 times)

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Offline kevcampbell

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Help with blooming yeast
« on: March 27, 2021, 02:27:11 AM »
Hello all it has been many years since I attempted a homemade pizza but I am back and ready to try again and hope to succeed in making something that tastes as good as something from Papa Johns as both me and my wife like the NY style, stonebaked and stuffed crust pizza types, but I will look at mastering each before I move to the next, I will begin with the NY first

For a recipe I have found a Tom Lehmann recipe, and have gone for a slightly modified recipe that Norma made, as it looks the best and does not appear too different from the original recipe but the results look amazing from the photos I have seen

My question, I am at the start right now, I have Allisons active dry yeast which is all I could find in my local stores here in the UK, I boiled some water in the kettle until the water was around 100 degrees and I added the yeast first without sugar, and it started to bloom but in the end it was just cloudy and not frothy like the results were after I followed the pack instructions to make 150ml of water and 3g sugar, I added 3g yeast which I see now was too much, as it was only meant to be 1g yeast for this recipe

But for this recipe I am not sure what I should be doing when it comes to the yeast part, when I dissolved 3g of sugar and the 3g yeast in the water it was frothy after about 10 minutes but I am still not sure if it was right and I just wanted to see if someone could help me with what exactly I should be doing, usually when I follow recipes I expect loads of different steps but I noticed the recipes here must be aimed more at the experts who already know exactly what to do and just need measurements for the ingredients, and some of the ingredients I may not be able to do exactly right too, my scales only measure in 1g and I can measure in oz too but my scales do not provide with me precise measurements that I need I am not sure what I should do about that

Offline wotavidone

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Re: Help with blooming yeast
« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2021, 07:17:12 AM »
Water alone wouldn't have had anything for the yeast to digest, so it wouldn't make CO2, so it wouldn't make froth.
Definitely need to see froth to be confident your yeast has been activated.
If you start with 150 ml water, and 3g each of yeast and sugar, it's pretty simple to mix it up well and split off 50 mL to get your desired 1g of yeast.
Mick

Offline kevcampbell

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Re: Help with blooming yeast
« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2021, 08:37:09 AM »
Water alone wouldn't have had anything for the yeast to digest, so it wouldn't make CO2, so it wouldn't make froth.
Definitely need to see froth to be confident your yeast has been activated.
If you start with 150 ml water, and 3g each of yeast and sugar, it's pretty simple to mix it up well and split off 50 mL to get your desired 1g of yeast.


Thank you for the reply, after reading I had an idea and I measured 50g water instead, with 3g sugar (which the dough recipe calls for) and just 1g of yeast (like the dough recipe calls for) (I used active dried yeast though)

These were the results, a photo of just after I added the yeast, a photo of 10 minutes after and a photo of me stirring it with my finger to just show you how frothy it is, not sure if this is what it should look like, but I will keep experimenting if I need to, I just want to get this right first before I make the dough though, if I have done it right though what should the next step be? Obviously I will do the same again, 50g water, 3g sugar and 1g yeast and wait 10 minutes and after that should I add the rest of the water the recipe calls for and the oil and all the dry ingredients after that and that will be it?

Offline wotavidone

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Re: Help with blooming yeast
« Reply #3 on: March 27, 2021, 04:29:51 PM »
Here in Oz, we get instant dry yeast. It needs no activation, so I'm no expert, I seldom do it unless the yeast is getting old.
But I would, once I got the yeast to the status of your finger test picture, just make the dough.

My work flow from this point would be:
Add about half the flour and any sugars/malts you are using into a bowl and mix well.
Add yeast plus rest of water and mix well.
Add rest of flour, plus any oil and salt, mix it in and knead to a smooth dough ball.
Done.

You would be mixing the yeast and yeast food first with all the water and half the flour, just to give it a head start before adding the ingredients that might inhibit the yeast. Then I'd add the rest of the flour with the salt and oil - giving the oil a chance to soak into the dry flour - and mix it all together.
In the end though, it all gets mixed together, so it possibly wouldn't matter if you just chucked the whole lot in a bowl at the same time and got mixing.
I just like to err on the side of caution where oil is involved. Can't say why, just a seat of the pants feeling that oil coating the yeast can't be a good thing so let's give the yeast every chance to get going first.
« Last Edit: March 27, 2021, 04:33:11 PM by wotavidone »
Mick

Offline wotavidone

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Re: Help with blooming yeast
« Reply #4 on: March 27, 2021, 04:36:35 PM »
Of course, if you have a stand mixer of some sort, it's even simpler.
Put in your water and yeast, and any sugars/malts.
Start mixer on slow.
Sprinkle in half you flour while its running, add the salt.
Slowly add the oil and remaining flour.
Mick

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Offline Hanglow

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Re: Help with blooming yeast
« Reply #5 on: March 28, 2021, 05:18:56 AM »
It looks fine to use in your final picture

I have used that yeast in the past and it smells much more yeasty than the instant yeast I also use, not sure why that is or if there is any difference, other than having to rehydrate it.

Most places should have instant too, (easybake is allinsons name for their instant yeast) I am not aware of any supply issues like there was a year ago

Offline typicalsam

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Re: Help with blooming yeast
« Reply #6 on: April 07, 2021, 05:44:09 PM »
Alternatively use instant dry yeast that doesn't need reactivated first - Allison calls it "easy bake" but it says on the back "use when recipe calls for quick, fast action, instant, or easy blend yeast" and other brands sell similar product in the UK too

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