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Author Topic: Lloydpan sicilian pan: Good for baking breads?  (Read 511 times)

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Offline Santo

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Lloydpan sicilian pan: Good for baking breads?
« on: May 25, 2021, 02:41:16 PM »
I just purchased a lloydpan sicilian 14x14 and i am really enjoying it for my pizzas. Would it be a good sheet pan to use for hoagie rolls or other rolls at around 375 F?  Focaccia?

Thanks!

Offline Gags

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Re: Lloydpan sicilian pan: Good for baking breads?
« Reply #1 on: June 01, 2021, 10:17:37 PM »
Hi Santo,

It's good for focaccia for sure, but for hoagie rolls (or Italian bread) I would use a stone.

Being a native Bronxite, now in California, I still need Italian bread!!  Here are loaves I do on the stones...

"I'd trade it all for just a little bit more"

Offline Santo

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  • Location: New York, NY
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Re: Lloydpan sicilian pan: Good for baking breads?
« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2021, 10:34:08 PM »
Hi Santo,

It's good for focaccia for sure, but for hoagie rolls (or Italian bread) I would use a stone.

Being a native Bronxite, now in California, I still need Italian bread!!  Here are loaves I do on the stones...

Hey pleased to meet you and that looks great! You shaped them amazingly and they rose really well. What is your secret? Lol.

I made a few loaves for the first time over the weekend using a king arthur italian sub rolls recipe. I looked for a really long time for a recipe i had confidence in for that new york style italian bread! This was the one i had decided to go with. They had a nice texture but they didn't really rise enough for my liking.  i think yours look amazing. Can you please share that recipe and workflow?

Here's mine. Made some italian heroes on memorial day weekend.

« Last Edit: June 02, 2021, 11:12:38 AM by Santo »

Offline Gags

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Re: Lloydpan sicilian pan: Good for baking breads?
« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2021, 05:45:40 PM »
Apologies for the delayed response!  That sangweech looks great!  Here's the NY Italian Bread recipe.  This is the closest I've been able to get to the stuff I grew up on in the Bronx.  I've been tinkering with the bread flour to semolina flour ratio and I'm probably now about 80% semolina / 20% bread flour.  Also, make sure you use good dark toasted sesame seeds.  Good luck!!

Recipe
Biga (a preferment made 1-3 days ahead)

Makes about 510g
189g unbleached bread flour
130g Caputo semolina flour
teaspoon instant yeast
213g water, at room temperature

Stir together the flour and yeast in a 4-quart bowl (or in the bowl of an electric mixer). Add water, stirring until everything comes together and makes a coarse ball (or mix on low speed for 1 minute with the paddle attachment). Adjust the flour or water, according to need, so that the dough is neither too sticky nor too stiff. (It is better to err on the sticky side, as you can adjust easier during kneading. It is harder to add water once the dough firms up.
Sprinkle some flour on the counter and transfer the dough to the counter. Knead for 4 to 6 minutes (or mix on medium speed with the dough hook for 4 minutes), or until the dough is soft and pliable, tacky but not sticky. The internal temperature should be 77 to 81F.
Lightly oil a bowl and transfer the dough to the bowl, rolling it around to coat it with oil. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and ferment at room temperature for 2 to 4 hours, or until it nearly doubles in size.
Remove the dough from the bowl, knead it lightly to degas, and return it to the bowl, covering the bowl with plastic wrap. Place the bowl in the refrigerator overnight. You can keep this in the refrigerator for up to 3 days, or freeze it in an airtight plastic bag for up to 3 months.

Italian Bread
Makes two 1-pound loaves
510g biga (see above)
189g cups unbleached bread flour
130g Caputo semolina flour
11 g salt
1 tablespoon sugar
1 teaspoon instant yeast
1 teaspoon diastatic barley malt powder (optional)
198g water, lukewarm (90 to 100F)
Egg white wash
Sesame seeds, toasted
Semolina flour or cornmeal for dusting the peel

Remove the biga from the refrigerator 1 hour before making the dough. Cut it into about 10 small pieces with a pastry scraper or serrated knife. Cover with a towel or plastic wrap and let sit for 1 hour to take off the chill.

Stir together the flour, salt, sugar, yeast, and malt powder in a 4-quart bowl (or in the bowl of an electric mixer). Add the biga pieces, olive oil, and 3/4 cup water and stir together (or mix on low speed with the paddle attachment) until a ball forms, adjusting the water or flour according to need. The dough should be slightly sticky and soft, but not batterlike or very sticky. If the dough feels tough and stiff, add more water to soften (it is better to have the dough too soft than too stiff at this point).
Sprinkle flour on the counter, transfer the dough to the counter, and begin kneading (or mixing on medium speed with the dough hook). Knead (or mix) for about 10 minutes, adding flour as needed, until the dough is tacky, but not sticky, and supple. The dough should register 77 to 81 degrees F. Lightly oil a large bowl and transfer the dough to the bowl, rolling it to coat it with the oil. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap.

Ferment at room temperature for approximately 2 hours, or until the dough doubles in size.
Gently divide the dough into 2 equal pieces of about 18 ounces each. Carefully form the pieces into batards, instructions below, degassing the dough as little as possible. Lightly dust with a sprinkle of flour, cover with a towel or plastic wrap, and let rest for 5 minutes. Then complete the shaping, extending the loaves to about 12 inches in length. Line a sheet pan with baking parchment and dust with semolina flour or cornmeal. Place the loaves on the pan and lightly mist with spray oil. Cover loosely with plastic wrap.

Proof at room temperature for about 1 hour, or until the loaves have grown to about 1.5 times their original size.

Preheat the oven to 500F, having an empty heavy duty sheet pan or cast-iron fying pan on the top shelf or oven floor. Gently brush with egg white wash and sprinkle with toasted sesame seeds. Score the breads with 2 parallel, diagonal slashes or 1 long slash.

For loaves, generously dust a peel or the back of a sheet pan with semolina flour or cornmeal and very gently transfer the loaves to the peel or pan. Transfer the dough to the baking stone (or bake on the sheet pan).  Protect the oven door glass with a towel so it doesnt break if water splashes.  Pour 1 cup hot water into the steam pan (Be sure to do this away from your face to protect yourself from the steam), remove towel and close the door. After 30 seconds, spray the walls of the oven (on the side farthest from the bulb) with water the close the door.  Repeat once more after another 30 seconds. After the final spray, lower the oven setting to 400F* and bake until done, rotating 180 degrees, if necessary, for even baking. It should take about 20 minutes for loaves. The loaves should be golden brown and register at least 200F at the center.

Transfer the loaves to a cooling rack, turn off the oven, put the bread back in the oven to cool gradually for an hour with the oven door propped open.

Here's a more recent pic - you can see the difference in the sesame seed color.


« Last Edit: June 19, 2021, 05:49:35 PM by Gags »
"I'd trade it all for just a little bit more"

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