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11
General Pizza Making / Re: G'Day - its been a while :-)
« Last post by Pete-zza on Today at 08:54:21 AM »
Hi All / Petezza

I have been making this pizza dough for about 10yrs now and see no need to change it - I told a few mates about pizzamaking so I thought I would share the recipe - I learnt so much from this site - so a major thank you esp Petezza.  Happy to explain why each ingredient is there - this dough can be used after 5 to 6 hrs.
Cheers
wazzamcg
wazzancg,

It's great to see you back and hope that all is well with you. We now have a few more members from Australia than we had when you were last here.

Peter
12
Off-Topic Foods / Re: Today's Bread
« Last post by [email protected] on Today at 08:30:20 AM »
Gorgeous loaf, Papa T. Bet it tasted even better than it looks.
13
Neapolitan Style / Re: Pizza Canotto with Biga
« Last post by Pete_da_Bayer on Today at 08:28:57 AM »
That is gorgeous. The crumb looks perfect to me! Another item on my to do list, thank you:) Can imagine, that a long, cold maturation of dough balls comes in handy for Pizzerias.
14
Sodface
Those are 10" pizzas.  The sauce is made from Stanislaus 7 11s.  We use cornmeal to slide pizzas off of our peels.  Cheese is low moisture mozzarella

john
15
Dough Clinic / Re: Over-kneaded or under-kneaded?
« Last post by HansB on Today at 07:59:46 AM »
Oil actually does have an indirect effect on hydration. It attenuates the rate at which the water in your dough is released by the heat in the oven. And 3% is a fairly significant amount to use, in my opinion anyway. If you're noticing a significant change in your finished crust, you should consider any and all changes that you've made to your recipe and process, and that definitely would include the addition of oil. It can be a real game changer, either good or bad. Others here have already noted the effect it can have on gluten development depending on when you incorporate it in your dough, but bear in mind that yeast is not the only bacteria that's catalyzing the gluten development in your dough when you're using a sourdough culture. I don't know for sure how oil affects that sort of bacteria, but that's just it- sourdough is always a little bit unpredictable when you're exposing it to any sort of new ingredient or condition. And while I'm hardly an expert on sourdough baking in general, I think it's fairly uncommon for anyone to incorporate much, if any, oil in any kind of dough made using sourdough culture. I could be wrong on that point, but I don't think so.  I'm not saying for sure that the oil had a huge effect, but I think it very well could have.

FYI, yeast is not a bacteria. Using oil along with sourdough is not at all uncommon. I have used up to 5% oil in sourdough formulas with excellent results.
16
Home Ovens / Re: Looking for new wood or wood-gas oven
« Last post by amolapizza on Today at 05:55:44 AM »
I can't comment first hand on the ovens, but know that they are well regarded by my Italian pizza making friends.  I have one friend that ran his really hot for some Da Michele style and he was very happy with the result except that he thought the floor was slightly too conductive at such high temperatures.  This was with wood and over 500C measured on the floor, but the bottom didn't really burn.  He built a brick oven over the summer, not because he was unhappy, but because he wanted more place for more pizzas.

IMO (though I don't have all that much experience), it's hard to tell the difference between a good gas or wood oven.  Gas doesn't have the allure of wood, but on the other hand it's very convenient and clean. FWIW, the Avanzini burners are regarded as some of the best for pizza ovens in Italy.

I think there are some people who have commented on this oven on the forums over the years, there are also some videos on youtube that you can check out.

Best of luck!
17
General Pizza Making / G'Day - its been a while :-)
« Last post by Wazza McG on Today at 05:31:20 AM »
Hi All / Petezza

I have been making this pizza dough for about 10yrs now and see no need to change it - I told a few mates about pizzamaking so I thought I would share the recipe - I learnt so much from this site - so a major thank you esp Petezza.  Happy to explain why each ingredient is there - this dough can be used after 5 to 6 hrs.
Cheers
wazzamcg
18
Off-Topic Foods / Re: Today's Bread
« Last post by Pete_da_Bayer on Today at 02:48:29 AM »
I haven't made anything sourdough since my college days over 40 years ago. I started a new sourdough culture about three weeks ago, wanting to experiment a bit using sourdough for various kinds of pizza.

For the past week, the culture has been extremely active and happy from the daily feeding, so I decided to make a small loaf, about 650 grams, and see how it came out. I used 68% hydration and 20% sourdough starter, which brought the total hydration to near 71%. Just flour, water, salt. Flour was KABF with a bit of VWG to get in the 14% protein range. It came out pretty good for a 40 year absence. The flavor was awesome, crumb was soft and chewy, and Irish butter was the spread of the moment.

The pizzas on my to-do list are going to be fun. All will be made with flour, water, and salt, then some at higher hydration, some lower, some with with or without oil, and some with or without sugar. No yeast, just sourdough culture to make it happen. Looks like I'm going to need to delay that diet thing again. That's like 15 years in a row now, LOL. Perhaps after Christmas.
I am impressed. That bread looks fantastic! Looks like nothing forgotten in 40 years.
19
Dough Clinic / Re: Over-kneaded or under-kneaded?
« Last post by Jackitup on Today at 02:44:46 AM »
Agreed about the dough, but in my experience, with a planetary mixer, if you wait too long to add the oil, the dough will flop around like a beached salmon with the oil just lubricating the bowl. You can't wait too, too long. Spiral mixer?? No issues.

FWIW, the BEST upgrade I've ever made to my pizza is my spiral mixer. I have Tom Lehmann to thank for that.

Love the beached salmon analogy, made me spit on myself!🤣
20
Dough Clinic / Re: Over-kneaded or under-kneaded?
« Last post by amolapizza on Today at 01:21:42 AM »
I'll add my 2 cents.  If you really see the dough tearing when doing slaps and fold, then stop immediately.  I'm talking about the surface tearing and getting wetter, that is a sign that you are overdoing it and will break your dough if you persist.

It's often said that pizza dough needs less gluten development than bread, and you don't need to aim for a window pane test.  The gluten will continue to develop all by itself after the initial mixing.
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