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Author Topic: Where would you suggest starting as a beginner ? Interested in NY style and Deep  (Read 361 times)

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Offline Na

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Where would you suggest starting as a beginner ? Interested in NY style and Deep.

These are the styles I have chosen as I only have a domestic/home oven.

The variations and subtle changes one can make feel overwhelming to read through so I thought I'd refine things and focus on 1 or 2 styles to start with.

Any tips or advice are most welcome.

TIA

Offline billg

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Go through the forum and read through the various threads.  There are countless ways to go about making pizza at home.  The best advice is to practice, practice, practice.

Offline 02ebz06

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This would be a good starting point for NY style pizza   -->   https://www.pizzamaking.com/lehmann-nystyle.php
Once you get that down, you can tweak it to your tastes.
Can't help you with Deep Dish as I don't make them.

FYI - Instant Dry Yeast (IDY) is the easiest to to use.
Bruce here... My cooking toys --> FGM 800-B Pizza Oven, Pellet Grill, Pellet Smoker, Propane Griddle, Propane Grill

Offline RHawthorne

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Where would you suggest starting as a beginner ? Interested in NY style and Deep.

These are the styles I have chosen as I only have a domestic/home oven.

The variations and subtle changes one can make feel overwhelming to read through so I thought I'd refine things and focus on 1 or 2 styles to start with.

Any tips or advice are most welcome.

TIA
Looks to me like you've pretty much already identified where you need to start. You know what styles of pizza you want to make, and you've come to the best forum that exists for information on how to do it. Beyond that, I would say that before you start diving into recipes, you should start to get an understanding of baker's percentages and the processes that make pizza making work. Getting an understanding of what makes different recipes produce different results will give you a major head start, believe me. Stop using pizza dough recipes that call for cups and teaspoons, and start measuring your ingredients and paying close attention to proportions in a recipe. Every different pizza style has it's own range of parameters, and some have a bit more than others.
 NY style is a good one to start with because the dough is generally made with a lower hydration level than others, thus it's easier to handle, and a bit more forgiving on minor inconsistencies in ingredients from one batch to another. When you start getting into dough recipes with higher hydration levels, things can get a lot trickier. Your home oven is also well suited for NY style pizza. I don't mean to make it sound simpler than it is. It's definitely a challenge to make really great NY style pizza, but it's doable. I'd say some of our most knowledgeable and helpful forum members are all about this style, and it's also the style that's got the most coverage in general here, so you're in a really good place. This is probably the best place to start before you even dive into the forum: https://www.pizzamaking.com/dough-tools.html
 After you've got a good understanding of the fundamentals (hydration, salt, flour types, fermentation regimens), get yourself a scale that can measure in the tenths of grams if you don't have one already, grab some good quality flour (either AP flour or bread flour, or both), then find a recipe here that's easy to start with- preferably from a thread with a long history. Here's a thread started by a guy who makes great looking NY style pizzas: https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=71289.0 He posts tons of pics of his pizzas to give an idea of what kind of product he's getting with his recipes, and he regularly gives the numbers, so that you can scale your own dough batches according to the proportions of ingredients he uses, if you want to go up or down on batch size. Start at the beginning and see how the process played out for him. I'm sure he'd be happy to answer some questions. And here's another one that's been going for quite a while: https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=51924.0 He's been posting about his NY style pizza perfection journey for years, with a ton of detail about his recipes and processes. And he's on the forum pretty much every day if you want to ask him some questions.
 That's the best advice I can give right now. If you'd rather start with deep dish style, just follow the same advice for that. There's not as much information on the forum for that style, but there's plenty. Have at it, and good luck.
« Last Edit: April 18, 2022, 12:28:24 AM by RHawthorne »
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