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Author Topic: Dough not rising in a 24-hours cold fermentation  (Read 880 times)

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Offline romanhit

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Dough not rising in a 24-hours cold fermentation
« on: March 19, 2021, 07:32:57 AM »
Hi guys,

I tried a 24-hours cold fermentation for the first time, and I followed this great video on YouTube -

The issue I'm facing is that the dough didn't rise during the cold fermentation (or rise very slightly) and when I removed it from the fridge the dough size was almost the same as when I put it in the fridge.

Here are the ingredients and methods I used to make the dough:

- 743 grams of Caputo Nuvola flour (Tipo 0 flour)
- 483 ml of cold water (65% hydration)
- 22.3 grams of sea salt
- 0.75 grams of active dry yeast

Making the dough -
- I mixed the cold water with the salt until the salt is fully dissolved.
- I added about 10% of the flour and mixed it until the flour dissolved in the water.
- I added the dry active yeast (I made sure they were active) to the bowl and mixed it to activate the yeast.
- Then I added the remaining flour to the bowl and kneaded the dough in the bowl until I got a consistent texture.
- Then I removed the dough from the bowl and kneaded it on a lightly floured surface for 7-10 minutes.
- I put the dough in an air-tight container and let it sit for two hours at room temperature.
- After that, I move the container with the dough to the fridge for 24 hours.

As I said, the dough almost didn't rise and therefore I didn't get that airy crust that I was looking for (other than that the pizza came out crispy and tasted good).

Any ideas on what am I doing wrong?

Thanks,
Roman



Online Rolls

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Re: Dough not rising in a 24-hours cold fermentation
« Reply #1 on: March 19, 2021, 08:13:49 AM »
Roman,

You mention that you are using cold water to mix your dough and that is most likely causing your problems.  The temperature of the dough at its core at the end of mixing should be about 24-26C.  The dough temperature is largely determined by the temperature of the water, so you need to adjust that.  Also, you should suspend your yeast in a small quantity of water (eg. 20g taken from the recipe water) that has a temperature of about 35C. Targeting these temperatures should set the stage for proper fermentation of your dough.


Rolls
Parmigiano-Reggiano doesn't come in a green box!   - Chef Jean-Pierre

Offline romanhit

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Re: Dough not rising in a 24-hours cold fermentation
« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2021, 09:29:13 AM »
Roman,

You mention that you are using cold water to mix your dough and that is most likely causing your problems.  The temperature of the dough at its core at the end of mixing should be about 24-26C.  The dough temperature is largely determined by the temperature of the water, so you need to adjust that.  Also, you should suspend your yeast in a small quantity of water (eg. 20g taken from the recipe water) that has a temperature of about 35C. Targeting these temperatures should set the stage for proper fermentation of your dough.


Rolls

Thanks for your reply!
The reason I used cold water is that I followed the YouTube video I mentioned and he said to use cold water.
Do you reckon that the water temperature is the reason for the dough not rising? I'm asking because I then put the dough in the fridge for 24 hours and then the temperature of the dough is also low.

Offline mkevenson

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Re: Dough not rising in a 24-hours cold fermentation
« Reply #3 on: March 19, 2021, 10:44:35 AM »
Roman, when I take my dough balls out of the fridge after fermenting for any amount of time there is little rise. After letting the dough sit at room temp for 3-4 hrs the resulting crust is airy and light. I suspect you are not letting your cold dough sit at room temp long enough before opening the dough to form your crust. Please describe your process AFTER you take the dough out of the fridge. Please include how you make your dough balls and how you open you dough. Finally, what temp are you cooking you pizza at? Are you using a pre heated stone or steel? All these thing CAN influence the final result. Hope this is not too basic, can't hurt to review your entire process. The video is good but leaves out a few crucial details that may be beneficial.


Happy Pizza Making!


Mark


P.S . My calculations show that you are using 0.1% ADY. I would suggest trying 0.2 % ADY. I have watched that video many times before your post.I like his enthusiasm.
« Last Edit: March 19, 2021, 11:04:48 AM by mkevenson »
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Online Rolls

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Re: Dough not rising in a 24-hours cold fermentation
« Reply #4 on: March 19, 2021, 11:21:38 AM »
Thanks for your reply!
The reason I used cold water is that I followed the YouTube video I mentioned and he said to use cold water.
Do you reckon that the water temperature is the reason for the dough not rising? I'm asking because I then put the dough in the fridge for 24 hours and then the temperature of the dough is also low.

If I had to guess, I would say the cold water is the most likely reason, although other factors, as outlined by mkevenson, could be involved.  Even though the dough is going into the fridge, it is important for the dough to begin its journey at the correct internal temperature (approx. 24-26C) in order to kick start the fermentation process.  This temperature zone is suitable for the yeast's metabolic activity and it will take some time, even at refrigerator temperatures, for the dough temperature to cool down.  Activating the yeast at the proper temperature is also important.


Rolls
Parmigiano-Reggiano doesn't come in a green box!   - Chef Jean-Pierre

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Offline romanhit

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Re: Dough not rising in a 24-hours cold fermentation
« Reply #5 on: March 19, 2021, 05:35:37 PM »
Roman, when I take my dough balls out of the fridge after fermenting for any amount of time there is little rise. After letting the dough sit at room temp for 3-4 hrs the resulting crust is airy and light. I suspect you are not letting your cold dough sit at room temp long enough before opening the dough to form your crust. Please describe your process AFTER you take the dough out of the fridge. Please include how you make your dough balls and how you open you dough. Finally, what temp are you cooking you pizza at? Are you using a pre heated stone or steel? All these thing CAN influence the final result. Hope this is not too basic, can't hurt to review your entire process. The video is good but leaves out a few crucial details that may be beneficial.


Happy Pizza Making!


Mark


P.S . My calculations show that you are using 0.1% ADY. I would suggest trying 0.2 % ADY. I have watched that video many times before your post.I like his enthusiasm.

Hi Mark,
Thanks for your reply.
So this was my process after removing the dough from the fridge:
I took out the dough and cut it to portions (230 grams) and rounded them into dough balls by folding the sides inwards 4 times and pinching the ends.
I then put them on a tray, cover them with a thin layer of olive oil and cover them with plastic wrap.
I let the dough balls sit in room temperature for 4 hours.
After that I open them into pies buy first pressing from the center to the sides and then stretching without touching the sides.
Regarding the oven, I use a pre-heated oven (with a baking steel) that was pre heated for one hour and the temperate of the baking steel before I start baking is around 290 Celsius.
Thanks,
Roman

Offline nickyr

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Re: Dough not rising in a 24-hours cold fermentation
« Reply #6 on: March 19, 2021, 06:41:45 PM »
As Rolls said, I think you need to activate your yeast in a little warm water. You can use colder water for the rest of the stuff.

If you use instant dry yeast, you donít have to worry about activating at all.

Offline Pizza_Not_War

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Re: Dough not rising in a 24-hours cold fermentation
« Reply #7 on: March 19, 2021, 09:03:39 PM »
As an experiment, let your dough sit in the fridge longer. Try it at 48 hours, 72 hours, etc. See what happens.

FYI - I've recently been using cold water, cold flour, a scant amount of yeast and a small amount of sourdough starter. I then cold ferment for 3-7 days. Takes about 2-3 days before I see any real evidence of  activity. It provides lots of dough flavor doing it this way.

As others have said, you need warmer water to get the yeast going if you are doing shorter ferments.

Offline mkevenson

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Re: Dough not rising in a 24-hours cold fermentation
« Reply #8 on: March 20, 2021, 10:11:01 AM »
Roman, it sounds like your process is spot on. You have been given some great recommendations from other members. Perhaps the pizza gods were not smiling on you for the recent bake you describe. Let us know how the next bake turns out and send pics!
Happy Pizza Making!



Mark
"Gettin' better all the time" Beatles

Offline HAMnEGGr

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Re: Dough not rising in a 24-hours cold fermentation
« Reply #9 on: March 22, 2021, 10:17:18 PM »
It's not supposed to rise during cold fermentation.  Only slightly...

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Offline Sandurz

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Re: Dough not rising in a 24-hours cold fermentation
« Reply #10 on: April 14, 2021, 11:47:53 AM »
The first thing I'd look into is the amount of yeast.
It really seems a little low.

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