A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Author Topic: Does Longer Fermentation Bring Out the Taste of Salt?  (Read 461 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Puzzolento

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 517
  • Location: The South
Does Longer Fermentation Bring Out the Taste of Salt?
« on: February 07, 2022, 02:47:21 PM »
I am used to making NY-style pizzas quickly, like going from flour and water to finished pie in 2 hours. I have been fooling with longer fermentation based on advice from forum members.

The other day, I bought a wad of grocery store dough, which was refrigerated and pretty old, and while the texture was okay, and it blew up really well, it seemed too salty, and it had a weird aftertaste. I made dough from my own recipe and left it in the fridge for 3 days (somewhere below 40 degrees), and I found it tasted salty, too. I didn't change the salt amount, though. I measure pretty carefully and follow my recipe. I used 1 tsp. salt to 180 g KABF.

The pizza wasn't noticeably better than a fast-rise pie, except the air holes may have been slightly bigger. I didn't like the salty taste.

The obvious question: does long fermentation bring out the taste of salt? I have a new dough ball in the fridge, and I halved the salt. It's due to go in the oven tomorrow.
The man's job is to make decisions. The woman's job is to criticize them.

Sicilian pizza is Godzilla. Thin pizza is Japan.

Online scott r

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 5340
  • Age: 51
  • Location: Boston
  • I Love Pizzafreaks!
Re: Does Longer Fermentation Bring Out the Taste of Salt?
« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2022, 03:15:58 PM »
To me there is no correlation between fermentation time and saltiness.  However, there is a huge difference in flavor to me of a 3 hour dough vs a 3 day dough.   Its hard to describe the flavor difference, but to me the saltiness stays the same.

Online Pizza_Not_War

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 2991
  • Location: Portland OR
Re: Does Longer Fermentation Bring Out the Taste of Salt?
« Reply #2 on: February 08, 2022, 01:25:39 AM »
I'm not a scientist but I know that fermentation eats sugar and the less sugar you have the more noticeable the salt should be. I rate you a super taster for noticing that. The fermentation process creates loads of chemical compounds which will also change your taste buds and perception. Maybe a science person can explain it better.

It's probably why I like longer fermentation.

Offline Rolls

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 1722
  • Location: Hogtown
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Does Longer Fermentation Bring Out the Taste of Salt?
« Reply #3 on: February 08, 2022, 07:34:13 AM »
I agree with the two posts above.  I think the differences in taste you are perceiving are the flavour compounds developed through fermentation rather than an increase in actual "saltiness".  I don't like doughs that have been fermented for more than 3 days in the fridge because they develop a "metallic" taste to my palate, but I wouldn't really describe this as "saltiness".


Rolls
Parmigiano-Reggiano doesn't come in a green box!   - Chef Jean-Pierre

Offline texmex

  • Supporting Member
  • *
  • Posts: 3378
  • Location: Aquí no más
  • I stole my avatar from the British Museum website
Re: Does Longer Fermentation Bring Out the Taste of Salt?
« Reply #4 on: February 08, 2022, 08:24:11 AM »
180g flour to 1 tsp salt (5.69g more or less) is about 3.2% salt.  Most NY style recipes I have seen use 2% salt. 
Risa sin camisa, sinvergüenza.

A D V E R T I S E M E N T


Online Pete-zza

  • Lifetime Member
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 30990
  • Location: Texas
  • Always learning
Re: Does Longer Fermentation Bring Out the Taste of Salt?
« Reply #5 on: February 08, 2022, 10:29:24 AM »
I am used to making NY-style pizzas quickly, like going from flour and water to finished pie in 2 hours. I have been fooling with longer fermentation based on advice from forum members.

The other day, I bought a wad of grocery store dough, which was refrigerated and pretty old, and while the texture was okay, and it blew up really well, it seemed too salty, and it had a weird aftertaste. I made dough from my own recipe and left it in the fridge for 3 days (somewhere below 40 degrees), and I found it tasted salty, too. I didn't change the salt amount, though. I measure pretty carefully and follow my recipe. I used 1 tsp. salt to 180 g KABF.

The pizza wasn't noticeably better than a fast-rise pie, except the air holes may have been slightly bigger. I didn't like the salty taste.

The obvious question: does long fermentation bring out the taste of salt? I have a new dough ball in the fridge, and I halved the salt. It's due to go in the oven tomorrow.
Puzzolento,

Several years ago, I conducted some experiments to see if the amount of salt in a dough would affect the sweetness of the finished crust. I concluded that I did, and reported on the tests I conducted in the post at Reply 777 at:

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=3940.msg161018#msg161018

So, I suppose that if there were some form of sugar in the dough, either added and/or as a result of fermentation, and the sugars depleted over the course of fermentation, the crust may taste saltier.

Peter

Offline Puzzolento

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 517
  • Location: The South
Re: Does Longer Fermentation Bring Out the Taste of Salt?
« Reply #6 on: February 08, 2022, 02:21:12 PM »
I am much more demanding of my own cooking than I am when I go to restaurants, so I suppose it is true that I am unusually sensitive about ingredient changes. Perhaps I am picking nits, but when you get used to experimenting with tiny changes, I guess that's what happens.

I cut the salt by half, and now the crust does not taste too salty.
The man's job is to make decisions. The woman's job is to criticize them.

Sicilian pizza is Godzilla. Thin pizza is Japan.

Offline Tarm

  • Registered User
  • Posts: 2
  • Location: Virginia
  • I Love Pizza!
Re: Does Longer Fermentation Bring Out the Taste of Salt?
« Reply #7 on: February 12, 2022, 06:51:44 AM »
IMO you can effect the amount of simple sugars in fermented dough by adjusting the time and temp of dough during fermentationand proofing.  The colder you go the less activity you have from bacteria and yeast but the enzymes are still active breakingbdown starch into simpler sugars.  This causes a build up of sugars.  Increase the temps causes yeast and bacteria to become more active increasing the breakdown of simple sugars into CO2, lactic and acetic acids.   If one were to take dough CF 36-42F for a few days and only do a brief room temp proof and into the oven I would expect the dough to be sweeter versus a dough without a long CF and longer and or higher room temp or warmer proof i.e. 65-90F.   The latter could possibly taste salter depending on a person's sense of taste as well as ph sour tartness levels of the final dough with the salt again depending on how the fermentation and proof are handled..

I have noticed this with sourdough breads I have made adjusting the bulk, CF, proof time andc temps. Have not spent much time looking into this with my  pizza doughs.   I do believe the science supports this.

A D V E R T I S E M E N T