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Author Topic: Rice Bran Oil  (Read 244 times)

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Offline FoodSim

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Rice Bran Oil
« on: February 26, 2022, 02:46:23 AM »
I have mentioned multiple times in the past that I prefer using rice bran oil.

For full disclosure on my part, I use rice bran oil as my standard oil

1) It has a very high smoke point (490 F)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rice_bran_oil
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smoke_point

2) It has a neutral flavor to begin with, and less polymerization during heating (off-flavor production) occurs for the same reason as the high smoke point

3) It's extremely healthy.
http://whatscookingamerica.net/Information/RiceBranOil.htm
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/05/050512110703.htm
http://www.raysahelian.com/ricebranoil.html

Something that I neglected to test years ago was bilipid interfaces. At least if I did, I didn't report on it.

What I mean by bilipid interface is an oil of one type in the dough, and an oil of another type either on the dough's surface, or in the case of a pan pizza, on the pan's surface.

This may seem like an unnecessary trial, as one could argue for using a single oil in all cases, especially if it's a high-quality, high smoke point oil such as rice bran. There are two factors that can drive the choice to use different oils.

Flavor

Many, including myself, are accustomed to, and even enjoy the flavor of, dough made with extra virgin olive oil. However, its Achilles' heel is its lower smoke point 350-410°F and rate of polymerization. In fact, this is the weakness of almost any oil that has a positive flavor.

Cost/Availability

I would advocate for using rice bran oil anytime an oil with a neutral flavor is desired. However, it's costly. More so now with supply chain issues from rice-growing regions. This was actually the impetus for testing it as a stratum only, rather than as an ingredient also. (I recently had to wait 16 days for 67.6 fl oz to be delivered at a total cost of $17.99.)

It wasn't obvious how much the oil in the "volume" would diffuse through the oil on the surface and alter its baking characteristics. The two "volume" oils used in the investigation were soybean (vegetable) and extra virgin olive oil, while rice bran oil was used to coat the balls during proofing. In the case of pan pizzas, additional rice bran oil was used on the pan.

The attached images were taken of today's American (14", perforated disk) and Detroit (10"×10", pan) styles, made with extra virgin olive oil in the dough and each baked at 550°F for 6 minutes. They show the browning was consistent between the two. Importantly, the browning was also consistent with the exclusive use of rice bran oil in previous bakes. Extra virgin olive oil used alone would have polymerized more, producing a tougher, more acrid crust surface.

Using this approach, one can save money on rice bran oil, retain the flavor of a unique oil in the dough, and bake at higher temperatures.

Edit: Changed language in the cost parenthetical.
« Last Edit: February 26, 2022, 12:38:27 PM by FoodSim »
The yeast flies south in November.

Online Pete-zza

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Re: Rice Bran Oil
« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2022, 10:32:21 AM »
Christian,

I have been using rice bran oil ever since you first wrote about it, many years ago, and for the reasons you mentioned. Ever since, I have been ordering the Tophé Rice Bran Oil from Honest Foods, at:

https://www.honestfoods.com/riceoil.html.

I usually buy two half gallons, to save a few bucks, and I usually look to save a bit more by using RetailMeNot Honest Foods coupons at:

https://www.retailmenot.com/s/honest%2520foods?

I don't recall offhand what I paid in shipping costs.

Peter

Offline FoodSim

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Re: Rice Bran Oil
« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2022, 01:13:20 PM »
Peter,

I appreciate the information. The biggest gripe I had was with the delay. I was ordering from Amazon, as I have in the past for rice bran oil, and all the acceptable brands were shipping in a timeframe of around a month.

Tophé is the first brand I seek out, and two (2) 64 fl oz containers is what I have typically purchased, but the delay combined with the $0.3123/fl oz made it unacceptable. The estimated shipment delay has since been expunged, but the price is still high. Alternatively, the total cost to have the aforementioned delivered from the source you provided is $0.3175/fl oz.

The brand I went with because I could get it sooner, and because it contains only rice bran oil (no additives) like Tophé, was Gamma One. I'm not a fan of the container's sturdiness, but the oil is of good quality and I transfer it to a dispensing bottle anyway. As a bonus, the cost was only $0.2661/fl oz. For some, that might be a primary reason to get it.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01HHXJ8I2/?tag=pmak-20

If I ever happen to have both on hand simultaneously, I will compare the two in thermal conduction and smoke tests.
The yeast flies south in November.

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