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Author Topic: Beef Fallow  (Read 1473 times)

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Offline Vic44139

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Beef Fallow
« on: May 18, 2018, 10:33:41 PM »
Has anyone tried using melted beef fallow instead of olive or other oils in their dough? Thx

Offline QwertyJuan

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Re: Beef Fallow
« Reply #1 on: May 18, 2018, 10:58:40 PM »
Has anyone tried using melted beef fallow instead of olive or other oils in their dough? Thx

I assume you mean "tallow"??  ???

I've used both Tenderflake brand lard(pork fat) and Crisco brand shortening to see how they affected my dough. The lard definitely made my dough less crispy and more chewy. I "think" it may have given it a slightly better taste but it may have just been a placebo.  ??? I imagine that beef tallow would be very similar. I'm sure Tom may have a better answer for you though. :D

Offline foreplease

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Re: Beef Fallow
« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2018, 12:37:43 PM »
For me, keep the dough formula as-is and give me a bit of tallow as a topping.  ;D
-Tony

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Beef Fallow
« Reply #3 on: May 19, 2018, 10:29:21 PM »
The only difference between Crisco, lard and beef tallow is the flavor imparted by each. NOTE: Essentially all lard sold outside of a specialty food shop will be deodorized lard, this means all of the flavors associated with lard have been removed by a distillation process which renders the lard essentially flavorless as compared to that which you get in Mexico or a specialty food shop selling non-steam distilled lard. Beef tallow imparts its own unique flavor as long as it hasn't been steam distilled. Crisco, made from vegetable oils is designed to have a neutral flavor (that's another way of saying it's flavorless). By the way, tallow, because of its high melting point (about 135F) needs to be melted and slowly added or it will crystallize as it contacts the cooler dough/ingredients thus forming lumps of hard tallow that cannot be mixed out of the dough.
Tom Lehmann/The dough Doctor

Offline Vic44139

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Re: Beef Fallow
« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2018, 09:28:07 PM »
Yes, I meant Tallow. I couldn't figure out how to fix it once I posted. LOL!

Thanx for the responses. I was given some beef tallow and the first thing I did was make some french fries! So freaking good!!!!
I was kicking around the idea of adding it to some dough. I think I'll try it this weekend. I'll let you know how it goes.

Thanks!

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Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Beef Fallow
« Reply #5 on: May 23, 2018, 09:35:54 PM »
Remember how GOOD McDonalds French fries USED to taste? That's because they WERE fried in beef tallow, but now since tallow is not consumer friendly they are frying their French fries is a different fat (I believe it used to be a blend containing a good portion of palm but I don't know what they use today).
I find it amusing how good people find the food to taste when they make it like it used to be made back in the good old days when food was good...yes, it has changed.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Beef Fallow
« Reply #6 on: May 23, 2018, 10:00:42 PM »
Remember how GOOD McDonalds French fries USED to taste?

Great story behind the transition of McDonalds away from tallow:

https://player.fm/series/revisionist-history-2301148/mcdonalds-broke-my-heart

Offline petef

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Re: Beef Fallow
« Reply #7 on: May 25, 2018, 04:22:50 PM »
Great story behind the transition of McDonalds away from tallow:

https://player.fm/series/revisionist-history-2301148/mcdonalds-broke-my-heart

Thanks Bill, that was quite interesting. I never knew that one man was responsible for having McDonalds Fries recipe changed for the worse.

I think there needs to be a sequel to that story as the views on consuming fats are changing. I'm referring to beef products from 100% grass fed organic beef which can actually be heart healthy.

Just today, I was shopping online for organic 100% grass fed beef and upon reading the ingredients/nutritional label it stated a few grams of Trans Fats. But we are told that Trans Fats are the most harmful to our health!  Right?  Well, upon further research I discovered that there are 2 kinds of Trans Fats; 1.) Man made, and 2.) Naturally occurring.  The naturally occurring Trans Fats are supposedly heart healthy.

Here's the source of that info..
https://chriskresser.com/can-some-trans-fats-be-healthy/

Long story short, it might very well be that fried fats of all kinds are not heart healthy, but the tallow from 100% grass fed organic beef might be the most healthy kind to use. It's also quite possible that all of these changes over the years has actually made McDonald's fries less healthy and without a doubt, worse tasting.

--pete--


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