Pizza Making Forum

Reference, Questions and Help => Dough Clinic => Topic started by: Lisa on March 31, 2021, 11:37:27 AM

Title: Yeast questions
Post by: Lisa on March 31, 2021, 11:37:27 AM
Afternoon everyone.

Is it better to err on the side of caution regarding how much yeast you add to your dough and add too little rather than too much? I am amazed how little yeast is added to the mix on pizza dough recipes sometimes only calling for the merest pinch. How would you be able to see if the yeast was alive at such small amounts?

I only have scales that measure to the nearest gram. Would putting a gram of yeast in 100ml of tepid water with some sugar and waiting ten minutes till the yeast blooms then using only a part of this water say 10ml in the flour be a good way to ensure I have 0.1 of a gram yeast?

Also I am confused by the idea that salt can kill the yeast. How late can salt be added to the mix so as not to harm the yeast? The quantity of salt tends to be far more than the quantity of yeast so what prevents it over-powering and killing the yeast especially when you mix them together in the water.
Title: Re: Yeast questions
Post by: foreplease on March 31, 2021, 11:54:27 AM
Yes, almost. Use 1 gram yeast in 99 ml/g of water and no sugar for now unless you offset its weight by using less water. For the 1 g in 99 g water, 10 g of that solution should have approx 0.1 g of yeast. You can get a second scale on Amazon for approx $14-$15 in USA that will weigh small amounts to nearest 100th of a gram.


Yes, best to err in using too little than too muc. Really, it is a dance involving amount of yeast, final dough temp, fermentation time and temp, usually room temp for hours or refrigerato for 24 hrs up to a few days. This surprised me initially, too. Now I can make as many as 28 pizzas from one envelope of IDY. Good luck.
Title: Re: Yeast questions
Post by: ARenko on March 31, 2021, 02:28:35 PM
Afternoon everyone.

Is it better to err on the side of caution regarding how much yeast you add to your dough and add too little rather than too much? I am amazed how little yeast is added to the mix on pizza dough recipes sometimes only calling for the merest pinch. How would you be able to see if the yeast was alive at such small amounts?

I only have scales that measure to the nearest gram. Would putting a gram of yeast in 100ml of tepid water with some sugar and waiting ten minutes till the yeast blooms then using only a part of this water say 10ml in the flour be a good way to ensure I have 0.1 of a gram yeast?

Also I am confused by the idea that salt can kill the yeast. How late can salt be added to the mix so as not to harm the yeast? The quantity of salt tends to be far more than the quantity of yeast so what prevents it over-powering and killing the yeast especially when you mix them together in the water.
How can you tell if yeast is alive in large amounts? 

You should invest in a scale that measures to .01 grams. 

I often dissolve yeast in water, then salt in water right after.  I've never had an issue, although salt can kill yeast.  I've seen many Neapolitan pizzaiolo's do the same.  In a Q&A video Enzo Coccia answered this "question" (it was more a guy telling him he's an idiot for putting yeast and salt together so quickly), and he said yeah, it's true, but the time is so short it's not an issue.
Title: Re: Yeast questions
Post by: Lisa on March 31, 2021, 02:50:53 PM
How can you tell if yeast is alive in large amounts? 

You should invest in a scale that measures to .01 grams. 

I often dissolve yeast in water, then salt in water right after.  I've never had an issue, although salt can kill yeast.  I've seen many Neapolitan pizzaiolo's do the same.  In a Q&A video Enzo Coccia answered this "question" (it was more a guy telling him he's an idiot for putting yeast and salt together so quickly), and he said yeah, it's true, but the time is so short it's not an issue.

I think you can tell yeast is live by adding it to warm water with a little sugar and wait ten minutes or so. It will begin to show a very light foam on the surface if it is alive. I think this would be much easier to observe with more yeast than less.
Title: Re: Yeast questions
Post by: loch on March 31, 2021, 04:08:32 PM
The salt is not actually killing the yeast but it does absorb water and can keep the yeast from getting enough water to activate it.  This is only something to worry about with very low hydration doughs and something that won't be a problem with most recipes.

Dave
 
Title: Re: Yeast questions
Post by: Lisa on April 01, 2021, 11:13:32 AM
Why are so many yeast products sold in seven gram sachets? The recipes and methods I see on here would baulk at the idea of using anywhere near that amount of yeast yet for some reason seven gram sachets seem to abound. I have a pot of about 125g of yeast that I can use as much or as little as I choose and that makes sense just as I would use a salt/pepper shaker but I also have a box of yeast containing 8 x 7g sachets. The sachet format tends to suggest that is the correct amount to use.
Title: Re: Yeast questions
Post by: loch on April 01, 2021, 11:28:53 AM
I the US it would be .25 of an ounce or aprox. 2 1/4 teaspoons, which is often found in home cook books as a standard. Telling the home baker to use one packet of yeast makes things easier.

Dave
Title: Re: Yeast questions
Post by: 02ebz06 on April 01, 2021, 11:32:37 AM
Probably from a marketing aspect as well.
Why sell you 1g, when they can sell you 7g...
Title: Re: Yeast questions
Post by: megan45 on April 01, 2021, 11:38:55 AM
Why are so many yeast products sold in seven gram sachets? The recipes and methods I see on here would baulk at the idea of using anywhere near that amount of yeast yet for some reason seven gram sachets seem to abound. I have a pot of about 125g of yeast that I can use as much or as little as I choose and that makes sense just as I would use a salt/pepper shaker but I also have a box of yeast containing 8 x 7g sachets. The sachet format tends to suggest that is the correct amount to use.

Yeast sachets are intended for use in same day, quick-rise (sub-4 hour, and often as low as 1-2 hour) fermentation. They substitute a large quantity of yeast multiplying slowly over a short period of time for a small quantity of yeast multiplying rapidly over a long period of time.

Look at it this way: if you start with 1000 yeast cells and it takes one hour for a yeast cell to double, it'll take 4 hours to reach 16000 cells, whereas it'll only take a little over an hour if you start with 7000 yeast cells.
Title: Re: Yeast questions
Post by: Pete-zza on April 01, 2021, 12:12:51 PM
If one goes to the websites of the yeast producers, like Fleischmann's or Red Star (a unit of lesaffre), just about all of the recipes for pizza dough are for same day use, and even after a few hours, as megan45 said. So the amounts of yeast will be on the high side.

Peter