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Author Topic: Adding rice flour in the mix  (Read 337 times)

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Offline Sandurz

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Adding rice flour in the mix
« on: May 24, 2021, 11:29:37 AM »
Hello everyone!

In my favorite pizzeria they have several different doughs on the menu, and one that I liked in the past was 00 mixed with rice flour.
I know adding rice flour is not uncommon here (we like our pizzas thin and with a somewhat crunchy rim) and I am curious to try that myself.

At the time I knew nothing about doughs so when the girl taking our order said that it was "50% 00 flour and 50% red rice flour" I just nodded politely.

Now I suspect this is not even remotely possible, and I'm planning to start with like 15%

My usual recipe is
00/0 F: 100%
W: 57%
O: 2%
S: 3%
ADY: 0,05%-0,13% depending on the fermentation times and temperatures.

I am planning to add 15% rice flour to that treating it as if it was salt or oil, would that be correct?

Offline HansB

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Re: Adding rice flour in the mix
« Reply #1 on: May 24, 2021, 12:04:14 PM »
Pinsa uses rice flour and soy flour. I think you should treat it as flour...
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Offline QwertyJuan

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Re: Adding rice flour in the mix
« Reply #2 on: May 24, 2021, 01:32:15 PM »
I can guarantee Tom has mentioned this before. Maybe Peter can find it. I would tend to think it should be part of the flour as Hans says, BUT it doesn't form gluten(not sure if that matters or not though). Maybe Peter can work his magic and pull up an old post where Tom discussed this.

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Adding rice flour in the mix
« Reply #3 on: May 24, 2021, 04:40:04 PM »
I can guarantee Tom has mentioned this before. Maybe Peter can find it. I would tend to think it should be part of the flour as Hans says, BUT it doesn't form gluten(not sure if that matters or not though). Maybe Peter can work his magic and pull up an old post where Tom discussed this.
QJ,

I did two searches of Tom's posts today, one using only the term rice and the other using only the term soy. That way, it was less likely that I would miss relevant posts but it is possible that Tom responded to posts on the subject of rice flour or soy flour without using those terms in his replies.

As for the rice flour, I did not find any post by Tom where rice flour was part of a total flour blend. He mentioned rice flour in several posts but it was in the context of its use as part of a release agent to be used on peels or something similar.

As for the soy flour, I found several posts in which Tom reference soy flour but he was not a big fan of soy flour in general but he had less of a problem with defatted soy flour. Here are the principal posts on the subject that I found:

Reply 5 at https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=10170.msg539512;topicseen#msg539512

Reply 16 at https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=46961.msg471669;topicseen#msg471669

Reply 10 at https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=60097.msg602691;topicseen#msg602691

Reply 27 at https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=45627.msg442538;topicseen#msg442538

Reply 3 at https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=44941.msg449623;topicseen#msg449623

Several years ago, I made a dough including soy flour in the context of the dough being frozen for later use. However, I used only 5% soy flour. That is a value that I found in an article by one of the yeast producers. The post where I posted my results is at Reply 721 at:

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=576.msg62457;topicseen#msg62457

Peter

Offline HansB

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Re: Adding rice flour in the mix
« Reply #4 on: May 24, 2021, 05:19:49 PM »
This is the recipe I had in mind when I replied above: https://katieparla.com/pinsa-romana-recipe/

She uses 10% rice flour and 6% soy flour. I just received the soy flour, I'll try it soon.

Those amounts are fairly small. I think that I could put 5% sawdust in my dough and no one would notice...
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Offline Rolls

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Re: Adding rice flour in the mix
« Reply #5 on: May 24, 2021, 05:52:05 PM »
I agree that the rice flour should be considered as part of the overall "flour" in the formula, especially since it affects the hydration rate.


Rolls
Parmigiano-Reggiano doesn't come in a green box!   - Chef Jean-Pierre

Offline Sandurz

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Re: Adding rice flour in the mix
« Reply #6 on: May 25, 2021, 05:16:59 PM »
Thanks everybody for chiming in.

I had a vague memory of someone saying here that you should not take into account the rice flour in the hydration ratio for some reason.

I'll add 15% and consider all the flour, we'll see what happens.

I know pinsa has some soy flour in it, and I think also some PTRs do have it in the dough mix.
Might be a try for another time.

Offline Sandurz

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Re: Adding rice flour in the mix
« Reply #7 on: May 30, 2021, 05:59:22 PM »
Well I have to say this went better than I expected.
The dough (85% a mix of 00 Caputo Blu, 0 Caputo Nuvola and 00 Caputo regular as I had some leftovers from various bakes + 15% rice flour, 57% Water, 0,045% Yeast, 3% Salt, 2% Oil) did not handle bad at all, it was definitely crunchier and also very easy to spread.

I aimed at 18ish hours RT(21C) fermentation, mixed the dough saturday 12:00
Sunday 8:00 I realized I might have used too much yeast (the amount suggested was like 0.18 grams, and the precision scale arrived only this evening) and put the dough balls in the fridge (6C).
I kept one out just to see what would happen.
I took the others out of the fridge at 17:00

Of course the one that was outside grew more and was softer but all were easy to stretch (180 grams dough balls stretched to 12-13 inches, no cornicione).


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