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  • #41 by Cheazy E on 05 Aug 2022
  • Dropped the malt to 1%. Pizza stays super light, flavorful, and crispy at 48 hour CT and the crust features some nice blistering. Baked at 585 F on 1/4” steel. 6 minutes.

    Made two 15” pizzas. 420 grams of dough, per pizza. One pizza is half Grande East Coast blend and half fresh mozzarella topped with basil post bake. One pizza made with Mooliss mozzarella (they are sending free samples on request) topped with dried oregano and light seasoning.

    The vegan pizza was pretty…different. Oddly enough the consistency was super close to Provel cheese used on St. Louis style pizza (Imo’s, Cecil Whittaker’s). If you cut it with real mozz, it could be a pretty interesting substitute for folks looking to clone.

    Good vegan option, I think, for those looking. :)
  • #42 by Cheazy E on 06 Aug 2022
  • On the subject of diastatic malt, I haven’t found any drawback to using pure barley malt (210 degrees Lintner). Even at what would be considered very high usage, it performs well, and does not have significant detrimental impact to dough consistently or handling. The dough it produces features complex flavors, browns wonderfully, and delivers an exceptional crumb and crispness.

    It does appear to create a softer dough for room temperature fermentations beyond 24-hours, but for cold fermentation, no change to dough consistency is evident. (I have far less experience with long RT fermentation, so pinch of salt with my notes here - it may be pizza “placebo effect” at work).

    I’ve also looked at major brands that use the “low” label, and it appears most, if not all of them, are achieving the lower Lintner rating, not through a unique grain or milling process. Instead, they are adding fillers, typically wheat flour and dextrose to cut the malted barley.

    For me, this means, pure barley malt is the better option, and to achieve the same results in a recipe that calls for low diastatic malt, you’ll simply use less of the pure ingredient.

    When digging in a bit deeper on the Breadtopia malt, I also found that they don’t produce it. They are buying in bulk from Briess - a company that’s been producing specialty malts for about 150 years - and then repackaging for home bakers.

    Given that most recipes call for very small amounts of diastatic malt, this is a pretty pedantic exercise, but given that many of us are intentionally hand selecting every other ingredient to achieve specific results, I thought it was an interesting experiment to run a few times.

    Cheers!

  • #43 by TXCraig1 on 06 Aug 2022
  • I’ve also looked at major brands that use the “low” label, and it appears most, if not all of them, are achieving the lower Lintner rating, not through a unique grain or milling process. Instead, they are adding fillers, typically wheat flour...

    I know. Don't you just hate that wheat flour in your pizza dough   :-D
  • #44 by Cheazy E on 06 Aug 2022
  • I know. Don't you just hate that wheat flour in your pizza dough   :-D

    I’m working on flourless pizza next!

    Definitely deep in the weeds, but does seem strange to me to pay a premium for flour and sugar when you could be buying a much higher quality ingredient for less money.

    Why not just buy barley malt with no filler? To your point, you already have wheat flour and don’t need the sugar (and presumably have that on hand if you want to include it).
  • #45 by TXCraig1 on 06 Aug 2022
  • I like 0.2% of 20 degree. The amount of additional ingredients in negligible. and the difference in cost wouldn't even amount to pennies. Given that, I like the easier to measure option.

    The highest I've tried is 2% of 20 degree and it made the dough significantly sticky in RT fermentations beyond 6 hours or so.
  • #46 by Cheazy E on 06 Aug 2022
  • I like 0.2% of 20 degree. The amount of additional ingredients in negligible. and the difference in cost wouldn't even amount to pennies. Given that, I like the easier to measure option.

    The highest I've tried is 2% of 20 degree and it made the dough significantly sticky in RT fermentations beyond 6 hours or so.

    Nice. To each their own!
  • #47 by Cheazy E on 06 Aug 2022
  • Same dough as yesterday with an additional 18-hours in the fridge for 90-hours of cold temperature fermentation at 35 degrees Fahrenheit following a 6-hour bulk at 72.

    60% hydration. 3% salt. 2% oil. 1% diastatic malt. .6 grams Caputo Lievito yeast.

    Baked at 585 degrees on 1/4” steel preheated to 615. Cook time was five minutes total, with the first two under the broiler.

    Flour blend is KA Sir Lancelot (88%), Cairnspring Mills organic T85 bread flour (6%), and Caputo Semola Rimacinata (5%).

    Cheese is Grande East Coast Blend. Tomatoes are very finely milled and salted Alta Cucina, with a very small amount of Calabrian oregano and extra virgin olive oil.

    Nothing on this pizza post bake. Plain as they come. Strange shot of a mostly eaten slice in there because I’m odd and I though it was a nice shot of the thin crisp crust and small blistering this dough delivers.

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