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Author Topic: Par Bake Dough  (Read 9810 times)

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Offline Park.Pizza

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Re: Par Bake Dough
« Reply #20 on: March 29, 2006, 09:51:32 AM »
Hi Pete,

Yes, it is a Lehmann NY style type pizza. I think I borrowed it from Pizzagirls post's a while back.  As for  flour, I haven't tried Sir Lancelot yet. But from previous posts and a few pizza books that I've read, I've come up with my own formula. But after your last post of Lehmann recommending no more that about 20-25%. I may be doing something incorrect. My flour formula is simply:

5lbs Bread Flour (Pillsbury or Gold Medal)
1lbs Semolina

I dump it into my 6qt KictchenAid, stir it slowly for a few minutes. And then I store it in a big Tupperware container. When I make my dough I use the recipe listed and the crust seems to turn out well. I toss my dough, throw them on the screens, give the a 3-4 minute shot in the oven, then dress them with sauce and toppings. Being tough to chew hasn't been an issue. I don't know, maybe we have strong jaws here in Milwaukee. My goal has been to get the perfect cracker crust.

What's your thoughts?

Tim :D
« Last Edit: March 29, 2006, 09:54:11 AM by Park.Pizza »
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Offline Aaron

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Re: Par Bake Dough
« Reply #21 on: March 29, 2006, 10:05:20 AM »
Park Pizza you can be proud of those for sure,nice job.
Aaron

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Par Bake Dough
« Reply #22 on: March 29, 2006, 10:43:10 AM »
Tim,

My view is that if it ain't broke, don't fix it. Your ratio of semolina to bread flour seems fine.

What you might experiment with sometime is to try a 16", or even an 18" if it will fit in the oven you have to work with. It's more for show than anything else, especially the 18" because of its impressively large size. Of course, you will find that it is harder to toss and spin a 16" or 18" size.

Peter

Offline Park.Pizza

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Re: Par Bake Dough
« Reply #23 on: March 29, 2006, 11:11:20 AM »
Pete,

16" - 18" Holy Cow! 

I'm limited to my stone tile size. I'm using 6" X 6" x 1/2" tiles. Total size 18" x 12" x 1/2".  I'll just have to rotate it little more to get the benefits from the stone.

Ref.  http://fantes.com/pizza.htm#tiles
« Last Edit: March 29, 2006, 11:18:08 AM by Park.Pizza »
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Par Bake Dough
« Reply #24 on: March 29, 2006, 12:48:53 PM »
Tim,

When I make the 16" and 18" sizes, I use a combination of pizza screen and stone. I put the pizza on the screen on an upper rack position where it bakes for several minutes (usually to the point where the rim is starting to brown and the cheeses are starting to melt) and then shift the pizza off of the screen onto the stone, which has been preheated for about an hour at around 500-550 degrees F. At that point, the pizza crust is firm and it doesn't matter that it overlaps the smaller stone a bit. I usually shift the pizza off of the stone to a shelf just below the broiler to get some top heat from the broiler to get a slightly darker top crust. If you’d like to see what an 18” Lehmann pie looks like, you can look at Replies 260-262 at page 14 of the Lehmann thread at http://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php/topic,576.260.html. It was a fun pizza to make.

I assumed from your posts that you were using only a screen, which is easier to do when you are using someone else's oven, as you did recently, and where it is unlikely that your host would have a pizza stone or tiles. One of the reasons I mentioned Randy's recipe is because the pizza can be baked entirely on the screen, which could be a plus if you are using someone else’s oven.

Peter

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Offline Park.Pizza

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Re: Par Bake Dough
« Reply #25 on: March 29, 2006, 03:36:12 PM »
Hi Pete,

Screens, Tiles, I use them both in conjunction.  I thinking I would want to rotate the pizzas more to get the benefits of the stone tiles and symmetric baking of the dough.

I did take my tiles with me to cook that day. They had a convection oven which heated the tiles to 525° in about a half an hour. My conventional stove normally takes about an hour. The first thing I did when I got there was get the tiles in to the stove.

While waiting I had time to set up and get the first pie together. I had set up both selfs with tiles so I had two decks to work with. But after the second set of pizzas, I did notice a slightly longer cook time due to thermal lose in the tiles. I'd like to try one of those infra-red temperature testers just to see how the tiles react to baking multiple pies.

When I get a chance I put a photo here to show my oven set up.
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Offline Park.Pizza

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Re: Par Bake Dough
« Reply #26 on: March 29, 2006, 03:57:44 PM »
Peter,

I just went and looked at your 18" pizza post. Wow, looks great. I've got to try it myself now. Also, I've made pizza's in the past with just the screen. But I'll give Randy's recipe a try.

Man, do you get around. I mean in a good way. You have a ton of postings out there. Do you have a day job?  :-D

Ever thought about going into teaching pizza making for a living? By looking at your posts, you'd be great at it.

Tim
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Par Bake Dough
« Reply #27 on: March 29, 2006, 04:25:02 PM »
Tim,

LOL. If I had a real job, I should have been fired long ago  ;D. I now do pretty much what I want to do, and fortunately don't need any more money. What I do on the forum is a labor of love and hope that people's pizzas are better because of it. Beyond that, the only motivations I have is to make my own pizzas better because of what I learn from others on the forum.

Peter

Offline Park.Pizza

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Re: Par Bake Dough
« Reply #28 on: March 29, 2006, 04:37:11 PM »
Kudos to you Peter,

It is a labor of love for sure. But most of all, it keeps our family in the kitchen where we laugh, love, and have fun.
 
Best to you,

Tim
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Offline Park.Pizza

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18" dia. Holy cow
« Reply #29 on: April 03, 2006, 07:36:58 AM »
Hi Peter,

Well, I gave it a try. I picked up two 18" dia. screens. The first one I made was a little to thin. I had to use two hands to eat. The second turned out ok.  I still used two hands, but I was more graceful with it.

It was interesting to toss 18" of dough. What's a good dough weight for an 18" pie?
Thanks,
Tim
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Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Par Bake Dough
« Reply #30 on: April 03, 2006, 09:32:51 AM »
Tim,

I use the Lehmann NY dough recipe and a thickness factor of about 0.10-0.105.

At 0.10, the dough weight comes to 3.14 x 9 x 9 x 0.10 = 25.43 oz. At, 0.105, it is 26.71 oz. Either way, you will end up using both hands to eat a slice, since it will be about 9" long. It is, of course, possible to use a greater thickness factor, which will make a thicker crust. You could also use a lower hydration to get a firmer handling slice.

Peter

Offline Park.Pizza

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Re: Par Bake Dough
« Reply #31 on: April 03, 2006, 12:16:27 PM »
:-\ I was 21-22oz. I was low on my first guess. We'll try to toss 25oz next.

Thanks again Pete,

Tim
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