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Author Topic: Caputo Blue Bag - Shelf Life?  (Read 2773 times)

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Offline Jayhak

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Caputo Blue Bag - Shelf Life?
« on: January 17, 2015, 11:56:36 AM »
Last week i ordered a 55lb bag of Caputo 00 - Blue Bag.

I opened it yesterday only to realize how much it actually was  :-\.

I've since covered the open area with some plastic but I was just wondering how long it will stay fresh opened since it seems like it will take a while to finish this massive bag?

Thanks

Offline sub

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Re: Caputo Blue Bag - Shelf Life?
« Reply #1 on: January 17, 2015, 12:19:25 PM »
Hi Jayhak,

Normaly the shelf life is written on the bag.

Offline trosenberg

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Re: Caputo Blue Bag - Shelf Life?
« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2015, 12:56:06 PM »
Get some of those big plastic canisters from a resturant supply and store it in them. It will be fine for months.
Trosenberg

Offline TXCraig1

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Re: Caputo Blue Bag - Shelf Life?
« Reply #3 on: January 17, 2015, 01:33:14 PM »
I've kept it in the freezer for well over a year with no problems.
"We make great pizza, with sourdough when we can, baker's yeast when we must, but always great pizza."  
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Offline Bill/SFNM

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Re: Caputo Blue Bag - Shelf Life?
« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2015, 01:35:47 PM »
And don't hesitate to use it for things other than pizza. I use it for pasta, flour tortillas, pancakes, waffles, biscuits, rich egg/butter doughs, etc. Throw in some VWG or malt powder or whole wheat flour or whatever amendments to tweak it for the task at hand. 

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Offline Pab

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Re: Caputo Blue Bag - Shelf Life?
« Reply #5 on: January 17, 2015, 02:15:27 PM »
This is a most interesting and useful  topic.
I shall now freeze excess Caputo  flour and then it can fight another day.

ta

pab.

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Caputo Blue Bag - Shelf Life?
« Reply #6 on: January 17, 2015, 05:56:12 PM »
I totally agree with all the answers, and TX is spot on with regard to freezing the flour. We have held it for years in the freezer without and significant loss of quality. Here is another trick that you can use too. Split up the flour into smaller batches, plastic containers (I just use plastic bags like gallon size Zip-Lok bags, label and date the bags for future reference) Place into the freezer for 6 to 8-weeks, if you're like us, freezer space is not all that plentiful (two chest freezers filled with frozen fruit, vegetables, cheese, and venison) go figure! Then, after the 6 to 8-week freezing period you can remove some of the bags for more immediate use (say, a 3-month supply) and store them in a convenient location at room temperature, then as you draw those down you just remove more bags of flour to replace them. Once the flour has been frozen for 6 to 8-weeks you can store it at room temperature for at least 6-months, after that the flour will generally show some signs of natural oxidation (think bromate) which might impact the way the flour performs as compared to fresh flour. The oxidation process is slowed so much under frozen storage conditions that the flour will perform as fresh for at minimum a year or more. This is based on someone not liking the performance of an oxidized (bromated) flour..... most of us will fail to see a problem here. But if it is a problem, just relegate the flour to making bread and rolls. We just pulled flour out from our freezer for Holiday baking that was dated as being just over two years old (that's why it's important to label and date each bag) and it performed flawlessly in making bread, sweet dough, calzones and pizza.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

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