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Author Topic: NY Style sauce discussion  (Read 74494 times)

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Offline hammettjr

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Re: NY Style sauce discussion
« Reply #520 on: July 04, 2019, 09:57:57 AM »
When I use canned whole peeled tomato, I use the tomato only, discarding the liquid that packs the can.

Does anyone think that pizzerias do this? I'm guessing that they wouldn't want to waste some of the product.

I'm going to open a can of Alta Cucina this weekend. I'm planning to stick blend the whole can, in the liquid. And freeze what I don't use (which will be most of the can). This will be my first time really using the liquid. And it's only my second time ever using Alta Cucina.

What do you think?

Matt

Offline foreplease

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Re: NY Style sauce discussion
« Reply #521 on: July 04, 2019, 10:53:43 AM »
Its 6 #10 cans. Thats way too little spice imo.
Plus 3 #10 cans of water. Like Emeril says, ďI donít know where you get your water but where I get mine it donít come seasoned.Ē

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Offline foreplease

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Re: NY Style sauce discussion
« Reply #522 on: July 04, 2019, 11:15:59 AM »
When I use canned whole peeled tomato, I use the tomato only, discarding the liquid that packs the can.

Does anyone think that pizzerias do this? I'm guessing that they wouldn't want to waste some of the product.

I'm going to open a can of Alta Cucina this weekend. I'm planning to stick blend the whole can, in the liquid. And freeze what I don't use (which will be most of the can). This will be my first time really using the liquid. And it's only my second time ever using Alta Cucina.

What do you think?
No NY expertise here. I agree that most pizzerias (most restaurants, for that matter) would not want to waste some of the product. I think they would be inclined to purchase whichever product most closely matches their needs. Wasted product is wasted money. I have a friend who owns a restaurant. I kid him that I will never see a banana in his place because he could not bear to throw away the peel. :)


In your Alta Cucina (which I have never had an opportunity to try) example, most likely I would have a small can of paste on hand to thicken or lend structure to the blended entire can of Alta Cucina tomatoes. That would probably be my second choice behind cooking it down to the desired consistency, which I understand is not common with NY sauces and, for many, any pizza sauce.  Third choice I would pour off and save some of the liquid, then add it back post-blend as I thought it needed, but this could still result in some discarded liquid. I have no idea on your seed questions. I stopped worrying about them years ago as I simply do not find any that survive to be objectionable.


When I find that I want to add liquid to a tomato sauce at home, I almost always use tomato juice rather than water. I might feel differently in a commercial pizzeria setting.


Good luck. Iím looking forward to hearing what you do and how you feel it worked.

-Tony

Offline Glutenboy

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Re: NY Style sauce discussion
« Reply #523 on: July 04, 2019, 04:33:01 PM »
When I use canned whole peeled tomato, I use the tomato only, discarding the liquid that packs the can.

Does anyone think that pizzerias do this? I'm guessing that they wouldn't want to waste some of the product.

I'm going to open a can of Alta Cucina this weekend. I'm planning to stick blend the whole can, in the liquid. And freeze what I don't use (which will be most of the can). This will be my first time really using the liquid. And it's only my second time ever using Alta Cucina.

What do you think?

If I'm using whole tomatoes, I usually reserve the liquid, crush or blend the tomatoes - whichever I want at the time - then add back whatever is necessary for the consistency I'm after.
Quote under my pic excludes Little Caesar's.

Offline NY_Mike

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Re: NY Style sauce discussion
« Reply #524 on: July 10, 2019, 09:02:09 AM »
If I'm using whole tomatoes, I usually reserve the liquid, crush or blend the tomatoes - whichever I want at the time - then add back whatever is necessary for the consistency I'm after.

That's how I usually do it as well, except I'll go through a little bit of the pain staking effort of removing the whole tomato's from the can, slicing them in half vertically and removing the seeds. It doesn't get all of them but it does the job. After that process I'll process the whole tomato's to the consistency I'm looking for and then add back whatever's left in the can. I've never added water to my sauce, and I don't really care to either.

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Offline hammettjr

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Re: NY Style sauce discussion
« Reply #525 on: July 10, 2019, 06:15:48 PM »
That's how I usually do it as well, except I'll go through a little bit of the pain staking effort of removing the whole tomato's from the can, slicing them in half vertically and removing the seeds. It doesn't get all of them but it does the job.

I used to do something similar. I'd break the tomato in a half over the sink to let the seeds out.

Now I stick blend them whole, then push it through a strainer to remove the seeds.

Matt

Offline Steve

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Re: NY Style sauce discussion
« Reply #526 on: July 10, 2019, 06:21:45 PM »
I used to do something similar. I'd break the tomato in a half over the sink to let the seeds out.

Now I stick blend them whole, then push it through a strainer to remove the seeds.

I read somewhere that you should not blend whole (seeded) tomatoes because you run the risk of the blades cutting the seeds in half which releases a bitter flavor. Best to use a tomato strainer (food mill) instead.

Offline hammettjr

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Re: NY Style sauce discussion
« Reply #527 on: July 10, 2019, 06:44:46 PM »
I read somewhere that you should not blend whole (seeded) tomatoes because you run the risk of the blades cutting the seeds in half which releases a bitter flavor. Best to use a tomato strainer (food mill) instead.

Thanks Steve. I almost bought a food mill last weekend (was at a William's Sonoma outlet store), but I needed a compelling reason not to stick blend.

I will say that I have plenty of seeds after blending,  though certainly haven't done a before and after count  :-D

Anyone ever notice this bitter taste from blended seeds? Sounds like I may need to experiment.

Matt

Offline Fiorot

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Re: NY Style sauce discussion
« Reply #528 on: July 10, 2019, 10:10:10 PM »
Thanks Steve. I almost bought a food mill last weekend (was at a William's Sonoma outlet store), but I needed a compelling reason not to stick blend.

I will say that I have plenty of seeds after blending,  though certainly haven't done a before and after count  :-D

Anyone ever notice this bitter taste from blended seeds? Sounds like I may need to experiment.
Seeds will change the taste of the sauce no matter what kind of sauce are making.  And I am not talking only about Pizza Sauce.
strain a few seeds and eat them .  Then think after a 2 hour simmer where that flavor is going to end up or 5 minutes at 600 f.

Offline Fiorot

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Re: NY Style sauce discussion
« Reply #529 on: July 10, 2019, 10:11:15 PM »
I read somewhere that you should not blend whole (seeded) tomatoes because you run the risk of the blades cutting the seeds in half which releases a bitter flavor. Best to use a tomato strainer (food mill) instead.
You don't have to slice them you just have to cook them for the same result.
« Last Edit: July 10, 2019, 10:14:12 PM by Fiorot »

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Online quietdesperation

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Re: NY Style sauce discussion
« Reply #530 on: July 11, 2019, 12:05:24 AM »
I tried a little soy sauce last bake, not sure I could pick it out blind but I liked it.
jeff

Offline NY_Mike

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Re: NY Style sauce discussion
« Reply #531 on: July 11, 2019, 07:54:53 AM »
Thanks Steve. I almost bought a food mill last weekend (was at a William's Sonoma outlet store), but I needed a compelling reason not to stick blend.

I will say that I have plenty of seeds after blending,  though certainly haven't done a before and after count  :-D

Anyone ever notice this bitter taste from blended seeds? Sounds like I may need to experiment.

I've never myself gone through the process of straining to get as many as I could out, but I have also read that seeds can lead to a more bitter flavor. Frankly, removing the seeds by hand by slicing open the tomato's has always gotten it to the point where it'd be very hard to find many if not any at all, and I also do cook my sauce a bit.
But it definitely would be an interesting experiment, milling the tomato's and straining them versus stick blend.

Also curious, where about's on LI do you live? (don't have to share or be super specific  :) )
« Last Edit: July 11, 2019, 07:57:59 AM by NY_Mike »

Offline norma427

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Re: NY Style sauce discussion
« Reply #532 on: July 11, 2019, 08:34:38 AM »
Tony Uva, of Sorrento Pizza tips for removing seeds using a strainer.

 

Also two photos of Tony's slices.

Norma

Offline hammettjr

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Re: NY Style sauce discussion
« Reply #533 on: July 12, 2019, 07:20:04 AM »
Tony Uva, of Sorrento Pizza tips for removing seeds using a strainer.

 

Also two photos of Tony's slices.

Norma

Great find. I'm really surprised to see a pizzeria break tomato by hand. Note that the pizzeria is in Stamford Connecticut,  and that he was making sauce for a "marhgerita".

On the opposite end of the spectrum,  I just found a pizzeria video where they stick blend directly in the #10 cans.



Matt

Offline Steve

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Re: NY Style sauce discussion
« Reply #534 on: July 12, 2019, 08:49:29 AM »
On the opposite end of the spectrum,  I just found a pizzeria video where they stick blend directly in the #10 cans.

I guess if including seeds is part of the flavor profile that you want, then no harm. Different strokes for different folks.

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Offline hammettjr

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Re: NY Style sauce discussion
« Reply #535 on: July 12, 2019, 10:32:05 AM »
I guess if including seeds is part of the flavor profile that you want, then no harm. Different strokes for different folks.

So you've noticed a flavor impact from seeds? (Before you said you read that it has an impact.)

I've done everything from removing the seeds one by one to not removing them at all to actually trying to chew them to see the taste. I haven't confirmed that I can tell the difference.

From what I've read on the forum, some people think the seeds make a difference while others dont.

An experiment I'm thinking about is to lightly cook 2 batches of just the liquid that comes in a WP can, but I'll add the seeds from the tomato to one batch (even trying to break some of the seeds first). Then will taste each batch.

I'm a bit annoyed that I didn't buy the food mill last week. And that I blended up a full #10 can before freezing.

Matt

Offline jkb

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Re: NY Style sauce discussion
« Reply #536 on: July 12, 2019, 10:37:28 AM »
I don't have a strong opinion either way.  Insignificant in the big picture, IMO.
John

Offline Fiorot

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Re: NY Style sauce discussion
« Reply #537 on: July 12, 2019, 11:53:03 AM »
I don't have a strong opinion either way.  Insignificant in the big picture, IMO.
The only way to know then is to make sauce with and without and taste.

Offline jkb

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Re: NY Style sauce discussion
« Reply #538 on: July 12, 2019, 11:58:44 AM »
The only way to know then is to make sauce with and without and taste.

I've done it both ways and don't care.  I don't subscribe to the "more work means it's better" dogma.
« Last Edit: July 12, 2019, 12:09:19 PM by jkb »
John

Offline norma427

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Re: NY Style sauce discussion
« Reply #539 on: July 12, 2019, 12:17:26 PM »
I guess if including seeds is part of the flavor profile that you want, then no harm. Different strokes for different folks.

So you've noticed a flavor impact from seeds? (Before you said you read that it has an impact.)

I've done everything from removing the seeds one by one to not removing them at all to actually trying to chew them to see the taste. I haven't confirmed that I can tell the difference.

From what I've read on the forum, some people think the seeds make a difference while others dont.

An experiment I'm thinking about is to lightly cook 2 batches of just the liquid that comes in a WP can, but I'll add the seeds from the tomato to one batch (even trying to break some of the seeds first). Then will taste each batch.

I'm a bit annoyed that I didn't buy the food mill last week. And that I blended up a full #10 can before freezing.



Matt,

I tend to agree with Steve.  I tried many kinds of pizza tomato products with added things, some with minimal added things, some with lots of added things, some fresh out of the cans, and even baked sauces.  Although I have my personal preferences, am sure not many members would agree with what I like, after the pizzas are baked, because we all have unique taste buds.  Just strive for what you like.   :)

To give you one example, I had been to Thom's bread and had one of his pizzas baked in his gas fired rotating oven, one made in his commercial deck oven, and one with he used his parbaked crusts, but all of the pizzas were made with the same sauce (tomatoes from Stainlaus.  Not sure how he prepared them) cheeses and dressing and all of the pizzas tasted very different.  The one baked in the gas fired rotating oven tasted the freshest tasting in the sauce department to me, and made a world of difference in the 3 pizzas.  I haven't tried the brand of tomatoes Thom used yet to see if the same thing would happen in my oven at market.

If you haven't seen this from Scott W. it is interesting that they did use a emersion blender to mash
all of the can's contents,  and do the taste tests of different tomato products along with different people.

https://blog.scottspizzatours.com/post/78009652485/tomato-tasting-at-razza-jersey-city

Norma

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