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Author Topic: Sausage and Roasted Red Peppers on the Blackstone  (Read 1348 times)

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Offline dmwierz45

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Sausage and Roasted Red Peppers on the Blackstone
« on: July 06, 2019, 09:54:31 AM »
Group,

Got a new 16" Fibrament-D stone for my old Blackstone, seasoned it, and last night, fired it up for the first time. Really REALLY pleased with how well it performed. Made a sausage and roasted red pepper pizza, using Caputo Blue 00, 60% hydration, EDITED TO CORRECT PERCENTAGES: 3% EVOO, 3% sea salt, 0.3% IDY, and a 3 day cold (refrigerator) ferment. Pre-cooked the sausage in a skillet, and ran the roasted peppers through the skillet for a couple minutes to reduce some of the entrained moisture.

Topped with Grande diced mozzarella from our local Gordon Food Services (no cornstarch added to the mozz), and some parmigiano reggiano.

Ran the Blackstone up to 900 degrees, then let it coast down to 800 before launching, and turning the flame back up. Total bake time about 2:30

Here are my results.
« Last Edit: July 07, 2019, 09:27:22 AM by dmwierz45 »

Offline Jersey Pie Boy

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Re: Sausage and Roasted Red Peppers on the Blackstone
« Reply #1 on: July 06, 2019, 10:25:43 AM »
Looks great!  Big difference with heat delivery from this stone...Maybe this would help reduce or eliniate my char ring on bottome rim? Anyine else try this?

Offline dmwierz45

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Re: Sausage and Roasted Red Peppers on the Blackstone
« Reply #2 on: July 06, 2019, 11:36:26 AM »
Looks great!  Big difference with heat delivery from this stone...Maybe this would help reduce or eliniate my char ring on bottome rim? Anyine else try this?

Jersey, thanks. It did exactly that. In another post herein, I complained about the char ring, and the new Fibrament-D stone seems to have cured that issue entirely.

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=58300

Offline jsaras

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Re: Sausage and Roasted Red Peppers on the Blackstone
« Reply #3 on: July 06, 2019, 12:20:46 PM »
Group,

Got a new 16" Fibrament-D stone for my old Blackstone, seasoned it, and last night, fired it up for the first time. Really REALLY pleased with how well it performed. Made a sausage and roasted red pepper pizza, using Caputo Blue 00, 60% hydration, 5% EVOO, 5% sea salt, 0.5% IDY, and a 3 day cold (refrigerator) ferment. Pre-cooked the sausage in a skillet, and ran the roasted peppers through the skillet for a couple minutes to reduce some of the entrained moisture.

Topped with Grande diced mozzarella from our local Gordon Food Services (no cornstarch added to the mozz), and some parmigiano reggiano.

Ran the Blackstone up to 900 degrees, then let it coast down to 800 before launching, and turning the flame back up. Total bake time about 2:30

Here are my results.

5% salt?  Thatís gotta be a record.  Were you insatiably thirsty afterwards?
Things have never been more like today than they are right now.

Offline dmwierz45

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Re: Sausage and Roasted Red Peppers on the Blackstone
« Reply #4 on: July 06, 2019, 01:16:02 PM »
5% salt?  Thatís gotta be a record.  Were you insatiably thirsty afterwards?

No, that's actually the baker's percentage of salt taught by Maestro Instruttore Leo Spizzirri in the one day immersion class in making Pizza Classica at the North American Pizza and Culinary Academy I attended a couple weeks back outside Chicago.

Hydration 56-63%
Yeast .5%
Sea Salt 5%
Olive oil 5%

Seems you have a different opinion? I've seen lower percentages, like with Jeff V's recipes, and IIRC, that's around 3.5%, right?

Dennis
« Last Edit: July 06, 2019, 01:32:53 PM by dmwierz45 »

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Offline jsaras

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Re: Sausage and Roasted Red Peppers on the Blackstone
« Reply #5 on: July 06, 2019, 03:20:50 PM »
No, that's actually the baker's percentage of salt taught by Maestro Instruttore Leo Spizzirri in the one day immersion class in making Pizza Classica at the North American Pizza and Culinary Academy I attended a couple weeks back outside Chicago.

Hydration 56-63%
Yeast .5%
Sea Salt 5%
Olive oil 5%

Seems you have a different opinion? I've seen lower percentages, like with Jeff V's recipes, and IIRC, that's around 3.5%, right?

Dennis

Salt content is an interesting component of pizza making, especially as it relates to different styles of pizza.  The standard Lehmann formulation has 1.75% salt and Iíve always considered 2% to be the baseline amount.  Iíve made NY-ish dough with 2.2% salt that came off as unbearably salty and Iíve made Neapolitan dough with Caputo with 2.85% salt that was not.  Given that 5% salt is more than double 2.2% (a.k.a. more than 100% higher), at some point dough will cross the line of being a sodium bomb. 

Perhaps Peter can weigh in on this??

Things have never been more like today than they are right now.

Offline dmwierz45

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Re: Sausage and Roasted Red Peppers on the Blackstone
« Reply #6 on: July 06, 2019, 04:17:38 PM »
Salt content is an interesting component of pizza making, especially as it relates to different styles of pizza.  The standard Lehmann formulation has 1.75% salt and Iíve always considered 2% to be the baseline amount.  Iíve made NY-ish dough with 2.2% salt that came off as unbearably salty and Iíve made Neapolitan dough with Caputo with 2.85% salt that was not.  Given that 5% salt is more than double 2.2% (a.k.a. more than 100% higher), at some point dough will cross the line of being a sodium bomb. 

Perhaps Peter can weigh in on this??

I hear ya, but trust me, the salt wasn't even noticeable.

I just checked on Jeff Varasano's website, and my recollection was correct: he quotes 3.5% salt for his NY pies.

The dough made with Leo's recipe is crisp, chewy, and rises nicely while baking.

I've just checked the handouts from the Pizza Classica class, and sure enough, 50g of salt in a dough with 1,000g of H20.
« Last Edit: July 06, 2019, 04:23:21 PM by dmwierz45 »

Offline parallei

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Re: Sausage and Roasted Red Peppers on the Blackstone
« Reply #7 on: July 06, 2019, 04:30:20 PM »
All doughs need some salt, if not they seem flat (taste wise).  On the other hand, if notice the salt it is too much salt.  Everyone's tastes are different.  Over the years, I've settled in on 2% for breads and all pizza except NP's.  I like my NP doughs w/2.5% salt.

Offline foreplease

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Re: Sausage and Roasted Red Peppers on the Blackstone
« Reply #8 on: July 06, 2019, 05:33:45 PM »
I've just checked the handouts from the Pizza Classica class, and sure enough, 50g of salt in a dough with 1,000g of H20.
Per 1,000 g water, or flour? If it is water, then the salt as a percent of flour (60% HR for this example) could really be just under 3%.
-Tony

Offline Pete-zza

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Re: Sausage and Roasted Red Peppers on the Blackstone
« Reply #9 on: July 06, 2019, 05:43:23 PM »
I'd be curious to know what brand and/or type of sea salt Dennis is using, or that Leo uses or recommends. There are so many forms. And there can be a fairly wide range of variations in granularity and also the impact on saltiness on the palate. Also, if Tony is correct, then the actual salt level will be much lower than 5%.

Generally speaking, the conventional advice is to use about 1.8-2% for ordinary salt, at least that is what King Arthur recommends:

https://www.kingarthurflour.com/professional/salt.html

Tom Lehmann has mentioned 3% salt, the highest value that I can recall from him for ordinary salt:

https://www.pizzamaking.com/lehmann-nystyle.php

Levels of salt close to 3% is also often used for Neapolitan style doughs that are to be fermented at room or other controlled temperature. High salt levels are also used in that environment to slow down the fermentation process, especially in the summer where ambient temperatures can get quite high.

Yeast producers, like Lallemand, say that 2% salt results in a 25% reduction in gas in the final dough:

https://www.lallemand.com/BakerYeastNA/eng/PDFs/LBU%20PDF%20FILES/1_19WATR.PDF (see the section Fermentation Activity of Yeast).

I suppose that one could use a lot more yeast than one would normally use and be prepared to lose some of its effectiveness due to the osmotic pressure on the yeast due to high salt levels. I personally am not a big user of salt in my diet and, as a result, I am supersensitive to salt in processed foods. Sodium levels are the first thing I look for on nutrition labels on processed foods. But 5% salt on my palate would be far more than I can handle.

I also think that 0.50% IDY is somewhat on the high side for a three day cold fermentation. I would tend to use about half that. But if the salt quantity is elevated, that could slow down the fermentation process and allow the dough to survive three days of cold fermentation.

All of the above can be disregarded if Tony is right. But posting was still a good refresher for me.

Peter


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Offline dmwierz45

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Re: Sausage and Roasted Red Peppers on the Blackstone
« Reply #10 on: July 06, 2019, 11:24:49 PM »
Per 1,000 g water, or flour? If it is water, then the salt as a percent of flour (60% HR for this example) could really be just under 3%.

Hold on, my bad. The recipe calls for 50g of salt per 1,000 g of water, and per 1,600-1,800g of flour. This would make 50g of salt more like 3%, as you mentioned.

The IDY percentage is around .3%

The type of salt called for, and what I used, was fine sea salt.
« Last Edit: July 06, 2019, 11:31:53 PM by dmwierz45 »

Offline foreplease

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Re: Sausage and Roasted Red Peppers on the Blackstone
« Reply #11 on: July 06, 2019, 11:43:31 PM »
Hold on, my bad. The recipe calls for 50g of salt per 1,000 g of water, and per 1,600-1,800g of flour. This would make 50g of salt more like 3%, as you mentioned.

The IDY percentage is around .3%

The type of salt called for, and what I used, was fine sea salt.
Good to know, thank you. Iíve done worse.  ;D
-Tony

Offline dmwierz45

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Re: Sausage and Roasted Red Peppers on the Blackstone
« Reply #12 on: July 07, 2019, 09:28:59 AM »
Corrected the percentages in the OP, and marked them as corrected, just in case somebody stops by and doesn't read the thread to the end.

Dennis

Offline Jersey Pie Boy

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Re: Sausage and Roasted Red Peppers on the Blackstone
« Reply #13 on: July 10, 2019, 10:47:34 AM »
Dm,


How long is your  preheat with the  Fibrament in BS?

Offline dmwierz45

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Re: Sausage and Roasted Red Peppers on the Blackstone
« Reply #14 on: July 16, 2019, 05:53:07 PM »
Dm,


How long is your  preheat with the  Fibrament in BS?

Jersey, about 30-45 minutes. I let it get up to 900 degrees, then bring it down to 800, on the theory that this might help stabilize the temperature across the stone. After a dozen or so pizzas on the new stone, it's still going great.

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