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Author Topic: Question for the Dough Doctor  (Read 408 times)

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Offline uppercrustpizza

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  • Location: West Midlands
  • I live pizza, I dream pizza.
Question for the Dough Doctor
« on: August 22, 2019, 11:35:10 AM »
Hi Dough Doctor,

I've been using a slightly tweaked recipe to your simple recipe that you've spoke about on multiple occasions for my shop.

Flour (100%):
Water (59%):
IDY (0.32%):
Salt (1.75%):
Oil (1.75%):

I haven't opened fully yet but we have had a soft opening and are open but haven't announced it, we want to iron out any issues.

Originally I was using your recipe with a cold fermention of approx 22 hours in a 3 degree fridge. I was taking the dough out as I needed it for each pizza.

More recently I've been doing the same apart from I've been letting the dough warm up to room temp for a few hours before use however I've noticed the dough has lots and lots of bubbles.
The dough is much harder to work with as it's really bubbly and also the dough is struggling to cover the screens although when I used to take it directly out the fridge before use it was fine.

Do you have any suggestions or should I go back to taking them out of the fridge when I need them, please note my room temp is approx 25 degrees.

Thank you
« Last Edit: August 22, 2019, 11:38:33 AM by uppercrustpizza »

Offline The Dough Doctor

  • Tom Lehmann
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    • Dough Doctor
Re: Question for the Dough Doctor
« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2019, 02:39:44 PM »
Where on earth did you get the idea to allow the dough to warm to room temperature before using it? I always say to allow the dough to warm AT room temperature until it reaches 50 to 55F (50F for use in a pizzeria). Doing this will not create a gassy dough ball and it will give you about a 2.5 to 3-hour window of time to use the dough balls from the time they reach an internal temperature of 50F. If when doing this you still have a gassy dough we will need to look at your finished dough temperature. Your room temperature of 25C/77F is pretty typical for a pizzeria so it's not a problem at all.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

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