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Author Topic: Best way pizza sauce  (Read 613 times)

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Offline Alexwilliams18052

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Best way pizza sauce
« on: October 26, 2021, 08:12:55 PM »
Can someone tell me how to make a good pizza sauce (maybe send links to where I can buy the stuff) thanks

Offline QwertyJuan

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Re: Best way pizza sauce
« Reply #1 on: October 26, 2021, 09:04:25 PM »
Honestly?? It matters on what style of pizza you want to make. Is there a certain type of pizza you're trying to produce??

Offline Alexwilliams18052

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Re: Best way pizza sauce
« Reply #2 on: October 27, 2021, 02:05:18 AM »
Honestly?? It matters on what style of pizza you want to make. Is there a certain type of pizza you're trying to produce??


New York style or neopoliian

Online Pizza_Not_War

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Re: Best way pizza sauce
« Reply #3 on: October 27, 2021, 02:08:39 AM »
I just use a high quality crushed tomato from a can. Recently I've found that Bianco DiNapoli Organic crushed is my favorite. It really needs nothing else for me to be happy, it has a natural sweet tomato flavor.

Offline QwertyJuan

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Re: Best way pizza sauce
« Reply #4 on: October 27, 2021, 11:13:54 PM »

New York style or neopoliian

Most people making Neopolitan pizza are in the "quality tomatoes and salt" camp... sometimes New York style will also have a bit of parm, oregano, garlic/onion powder and even a bit of sugar. Some places even go crazy with things like marjoram, thyme or even cinnamon (yup... it's a thing).

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Offline RHawthorne

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Re: Best way pizza sauce
« Reply #5 on: October 27, 2021, 11:53:06 PM »
Neapolitan style sauce should be just gently crushed San Marzano tomatoes (or Salerno if you can get your hands on some and you don't mind straying slightly off the purist Neapolitan path) with touch of sea salt. New York style can be made with tomatoes of pretty much any origin as long as they're of good quality, and should really not be too heavily seasoned, but a bit of salt and oregano is pretty common. A little crushed fresh or dried garlic can be added if you like, but some old school NY pizza purists say that's inappropriate. Personally, I keep my seasonings very light and simple in my sauce, and prefer to obtain the herb component from those added directly to the pizza, pre and/or post bake, not so much in the sauce. I think the main thing that differentiates the flavor profile of Neapolitan and New York pizzas as far as the herbs go is that NY style is traditionally seasoned more with oregano, and Neapolitan relies on basil, or at least the Margherita style. That might sound like a minor thing, but the difference in flavor is really pretty profound.
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Offline QwertyJuan

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Re: Best way pizza sauce
« Reply #6 on: October 28, 2021, 07:39:37 PM »
Neapolitan style sauce should be just gently crushed San Marzano tomatoes (or Salerno if you can get your hands on some and you don't mind straying slightly off the purist Neapolitan path) with touch of sea salt. New York style can be made with tomatoes of pretty much any origin as long as they're of good quality, and should really not be too heavily seasoned, but a bit of salt and oregano is pretty common. A little crushed fresh or dried garlic can be added if you like, but some old school NY pizza purists say that's inappropriate. Personally, I keep my seasonings very light and simple in my sauce, and prefer to obtain the herb component from those added directly to the pizza, pre and/or post bake, not so much in the sauce. I think the main thing that differentiates the flavor profile of Neapolitan and New York pizzas as far as the herbs go is that NY style is traditionally seasoned more with oregano, and Neapolitan relies on basil, or at least the Margherita style. That might sound like a minor thing, but the difference in flavor is really pretty profound.

Basil vs. Oregano?? Not minor in the least, LOL... not even comperable. My dad was from Calabria and he used oregano in everything... it's my favorite herb I think. It makes things taste "Italian" to me. Basil is beautiful(fresh... not dried), and the smell is sublime. (again... when fresh), but it's uses are very limited in my experience... the flavour is SOOOO mild when cooked and almost completely drowned out by whatever else you're cooking it with. Basil is best fresh to me... like in a pesto or bruschetta.

Offline RHawthorne

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Re: Best way pizza sauce
« Reply #7 on: October 28, 2021, 10:49:00 PM »
Basil vs. Oregano?? Not minor in the least, LOL... not even comperable. My dad was from Calabria and he used oregano in everything... it's my favorite herb I think. It makes things taste "Italian" to me. Basil is beautiful(fresh... not dried), and the smell is sublime. (again... when fresh), but it's uses are very limited in my experience... the flavour is SOOOO mild when cooked and almost completely drowned out by whatever else you're cooking it with. Basil is best fresh to me... like in a pesto or bruschetta.
I guess I should have said it might sound like a minor thing to some people. I'm with you 100% on the oregano preference. I like to use fresh basil occasionally when I want to make a margherita pie, but it's character is easily drowned out by other ingredients, and I have no use whatsoever for dried basil. And in my opinion, basil and oregano should never be used together in anything, whether it's pizza or anything else. Oregano just has a more hardy and versatile character. It isn't easily muted by other ingredients, and when you put a really top notch oregano on a pizza post-bake, the effect on the aroma is just totally transformational. I definitely never felt like I had made my best pizzas until I had gotten my hands on some really high quality dried wild Calabrian oregano. What a huge difference it makes!
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