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Author Topic: Small dough box for proofing  (Read 975 times)

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Offline plusacht

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Small dough box for proofing
« on: January 27, 2022, 07:04:26 PM »
Hey anyone can recommend a small dough box for proofing not more than max. 4 balls.

thanks

Offline FarAway

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Re: Small dough box for proofing
« Reply #1 on: April 02, 2022, 02:44:26 PM »
bump...
I am looking for one that size also.

May try this one... https://www.amazon.com/dp/B081D5L9KD/?tag=pmak-20

a little expensive but it should fit in the Fridge.
« Last Edit: April 02, 2022, 03:27:08 PM by FarAway »

Offline 02ebz06

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Re: Small dough box for proofing
« Reply #2 on: April 02, 2022, 03:06:27 PM »
You could make your own out of wood whatever size you want.

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=73823.msg705535#msg705535
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Offline RHawthorne

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Re: Small dough box for proofing
« Reply #3 on: April 02, 2022, 03:39:44 PM »
This is what I bought a few weeks back after looking around for months and finally settling on something thats not really perfect. It holds four  325 g doughballs just fine, although they do start to touch each other after they start spreading out a bit. If I had my way about it, I would either decrease  the height of it by a good 3 inches, or somehow put in another shelf inside the thing so it could handle eight doughballs. Its also not perfectly airtight, I dont think, but it works well enough when I put it in the refrigerator. I got it at Walmart for around $10 or so, I think. Its about the best thing I could find.
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Offline FarAway

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Re: Small dough box for proofing
« Reply #4 on: April 02, 2022, 04:13:59 PM »
You could make your own out of wood whatever size you want.

https://www.pizzamaking.com/forum/index.php?topic=73823.msg705535#msg705535

That is an idea... not sure it would work w/ focaccia? 
The overall thickness of the wood adds to the thickness of the box which I want to avoid.
What do you use for the top, plastic wrap? 

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Offline FarAway

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Re: Small dough box for proofing
« Reply #5 on: April 02, 2022, 04:15:23 PM »
This is what I bought a few weeks back after looking around for months and finally settling on something thats not really perfect. It holds four  325 g doughballs just fine, although they do start to touch each other after they start spreading out a bit. If I had my way about it, I would either decrease  the height of it by a good 3 inches, or somehow put in another shelf inside the thing so it could handle eight doughballs. Its also not perfectly airtight, I dont think, but it works well enough when I put it in the refrigerator. I got it at Walmart for around $10 or so, I think. Its about the best thing I could find.

Not sure how important it is, but that is most likely not a "food grade" BPA free plastic. 

Offline FarAway

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Re: Small dough box for proofing
« Reply #6 on: April 02, 2022, 04:18:43 PM »
These guys also have an interesting product, right size and price.  I am not sure if they have a US distributor.  They say the are recommended by Ooni, but I don't any proofing boxes on the Ooni websie.

https://www.solentplastics.co.uk/6-9-ltr-small-euro-plastic-stacking-container/

These are individual, don't take up much fridge space and might be good to freeze in also?

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09QXGM2GB/?tag=pmak-20
« Last Edit: April 02, 2022, 04:26:13 PM by FarAway »

Offline RHawthorne

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Re: Small dough box for proofing
« Reply #7 on: April 02, 2022, 08:33:43 PM »
Not sure how important it is, but that is most likely not a "food grade" BPA free plastic.
As far as I can figure, the BPA in a plastic container only has any chance of leaching into food or liquids when the container is heated. I'm not concerned at all in this application. Whenever it's got dough in it, it's in the refrigerator.
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Offline 02ebz06

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Re: Small dough box for proofing
« Reply #8 on: April 03, 2022, 11:07:29 AM »
That is an idea... not sure it would work w/ focaccia? 
The overall thickness of the wood adds to the thickness of the box which I want to avoid.
What do you use for the top, plastic wrap?

I think you an by 1/2" wood at places like HomeDepot to make it a little thinner and use 1/2" for bottom/
Top would be simple to make as well - just 1/2" plywood with some thin pieces glued around to just fit inside the container, so when on it can't slide off.

Plastic wrap wouldn't stick to wood unless you had a large rubber band to hold it.
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Offline RHawthorne

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Re: Small dough box for proofing
« Reply #9 on: April 03, 2022, 01:26:30 PM »
I've looked around some on amazon, and I'm still not seeing anything that looks better for the purpose than the one I use. If you want a larger one that can hold 6 doughs, those are not hard to find. But any of the options I'm seeing that are any smaller than that all look too small to me. I'd say maybe you should consider ordering some of these: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B009Z23W9A/?tag=pmak-20 . If you ordered four of these, that would fill your need. It's not a single box option, and it's not especially cheap, but I don't know what else to suggest. The kind of product you're looking for is just not easy to find, or at least it wasn't for me. That's why it took me so long to finally settle on one. Or just use smaller plasticware containers for each dough ball. That's what I did for a long time.
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Offline rascali

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Re: Small dough box for proofing
« Reply #10 on: April 12, 2022, 10:16:53 PM »
As far as I can figure, the BPA in a plastic container only has any chance of leaching into food or liquids when the container is heated. I'm not concerned at all in this application. Whenever it's got dough in it, it's in the refrigerator.

That's not really correct. BPA loves to leach into fats and oils. But it will leach into most anything short of glass and metals. Not good eats. Don't do that to people.

Offline RHawthorne

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Re: Small dough box for proofing
« Reply #11 on: April 12, 2022, 10:31:46 PM »
That's not really correct. BPA loves to leach into fats and oils. But it will leach into most anything short of glass and metals. Not good eats. Don't do that to people.
Where are you getting this information?
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Offline FoodSim

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Re: Small dough box for proofing
« Reply #12 on: April 12, 2022, 11:52:32 PM »
Where are you getting this information?

There are plenty of sources that discuss BPA leaching into foods from plastic packaging, but they usually do so in general terms. It has become common knowledge that BPA will release from plastics at higher temperatures, but about half the sources also mention BPA releasing at lower temperatures, just at lower rates.

If you want exact numbers to decide for yourself if the risk is worth taking, the following research on PET bottles can provide that:

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24907857/

The following is a summary of the relevant statements from the above paper. I can provide a link to the entire paper if you need it.

The releases for BPA were 0.26-18.7 ng/L at 4C (39.2F), 0.62-22.6 ng/L at 25C (77F), and 2.89-38.9 ng/L at 70C (158F). BPA release increased with storage duration up to four weeks, but the rates decreased with storage time, indicating that BPA release from PET may become stable under long term storage.
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Offline RHawthorne

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Re: Small dough box for proofing
« Reply #13 on: April 13, 2022, 01:09:51 AM »
There are plenty of sources that discuss BPA leaching into foods from plastic packaging, but they usually do so in general terms. It has become common knowledge that BPA will release from plastics at higher temperatures, but about half the sources also mention BPA releasing at lower temperatures, just at lower rates.

If you want exact numbers to decide for yourself if the risk is worth taking, the following research on PET bottles can provide that:

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24907857/

The following is a summary of the relevant statements from the above paper. I can provide a link to the entire paper if you need it.

The releases for BPA were 0.26-18.7 ng/L at 4C (39.2F), 0.62-22.6 ng/L at 25C (77F), and 2.89-38.9 ng/L at 70C (158F). BPA release increased with storage duration up to four weeks, but the rates decreased with storage time, indicating that BPA release from PET may become stable under long term storage.
The last time I did research on this, every source I saw said that it was only a concern if the plastic container was heated, but I do see some sources saying there might be some risk at lower temps. I don't think there's nearly enough verified scientific documentation (in fact, I don't know that there's any at all) that proves that storing food at low temps in a plastic container that has BPA in it is potentially hazardous for me to be concerned. Even with foods that are theoretically at risk of contamination, it's only with those that contain significant amounts of fat and/or acid, which pizza dough definitely does not.
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Offline FoodSim

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Re: Small dough box for proofing
« Reply #14 on: April 13, 2022, 01:51:09 AM »
I don't think there's nearly enough verified scientific documentation (in fact, I don't know that there's any at all) that proves that storing food at low temps in a plastic container that has BPA in it is potentially hazardous for me to be concerned.

For further consideration, see the "2.1. Topic-focused expert panels" and "4.1. Based on existing data we are confident of the following" sections in the following report, or read all of the report if you wish.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2967230/

How you want to interpret the results is up to you, but the expert panel found evidence of adverse affects even at low doses. There's no question we are all already exposed to low intermittent doses, and the human liver will metabolize BPA within 24 hours, but it's the constant exposure that creates the largest risk.

Again, you decide if the risk is worth taking.
« Last Edit: April 13, 2022, 01:56:22 AM by FoodSim »
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Offline Camarie

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Re: Small dough box for proofing
« Reply #15 on: April 13, 2022, 05:55:39 PM »
For further consideration, see the "2.1. Topic-focused expert panels" and "4.1. Based on existing data we are confident of the following" sections in the following report, or read all of the report if you wish.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2967230/

How you want to interpret the results is up to you, but the expert panel found evidence of adverse affects even at low doses. There's no question we are all already exposed to low intermittent doses, and the human liver will metabolize BPA within 24 hours, but it's the constant exposure that creates the largest risk.

Again, you decide if the risk is worth taking.

I thought about getting this, but when I make dough & let it rises, it seems to do it natuarlly, quite well & fast!!
« Last Edit: April 14, 2022, 12:48:53 PM by Camarie »

Offline 02ebz06

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Re: Small dough box for proofing
« Reply #16 on: April 13, 2022, 06:03:27 PM »
I thought about getting this, but when I make dough & let it rises, it seems to do it natuarlly quite well & fast!!

I have one of those.  Depending where you live, it might be more useful in winter than summer.
Happy with it.  Use it at least once a week.
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Offline RHawthorne

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Re: Small dough box for proofing
« Reply #17 on: April 14, 2022, 12:09:43 PM »
For further consideration, see the "2.1. Topic-focused expert panels" and "4.1. Based on existing data we are confident of the following" sections in the following report, or read all of the report if you wish.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2967230/

How you want to interpret the results is up to you, but the expert panel found evidence of adverse affects even at low doses. There's no question we are all already exposed to low intermittent doses, and the human liver will metabolize BPA within 24 hours, but it's the constant exposure that creates the largest risk.

Again, you decide if the risk is worth taking.
Another point I've never seen discussed in any of these studies is the question of whether or not we're talking about cooked or raw food that's been stored in one of these kinds of containers. I could see if there was clear evidence that eating raw, uncooked food that had a high propensity to absorb and pass on the BPA in dangerous dosages, or even dosages high enough that constant repetitive exposure would be an issue; like if you were eating a fruit with a high acid level and high moisture, regularly, that was being stored in said fashion. But I've never seen any study differentiate the potential danger levels between raw vs. cooked foods, or even one that mentioned any particular kind of food that was highly susceptible to contamination from BPA. I would think this should be a focal point of great interest if this is something we're going to continue doing research on. I means seriously, if this was a real pressing concern for humanity, I would think that the people involved in these studies would have identified at least one food that was inarguably dangerous to eat when it had been stored in a plastic container containing BPA, and would be able to supply some kind of measurable statistics, such as the exact or fat level of the food, the length of time the food had been stored in the container, the length of time required before whatever test study that was involved (that was biologically similar enough to humans that the findings were decidedly significant) started to show measurable health effects, etc. So far, all I've seen is highly generalized information; lots of "certain kinds of foods" with no specifics cited; lots of maybes and theoretical scenarios.
 For my part, I'm only using it store pizza dough, which does not fit the criteria of having a high content of either fat or acid, and it's going to be cooked anyway. I have seen no evidence presented so far that demonstrates that the food I'm storing in it would be susceptible to BPA contamination, or that the BPA wouldn't be rendered harmless by cooking. And I'm only using the dough I store in my container once or twice a week at most, so the constant exposure is a non-issue as far as I'm concerned. None of this means that I wouldn't be persuaded to change my mind if I saw enough clear and convincing evidence, but this has not happened yet.
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Offline texmex

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Re: Small dough box for proofing
« Reply #18 on: April 14, 2022, 12:27:42 PM »
BPA leeching in water bottles is pretty much the basic minimum.
Just drinking water from polycarbonate bottles over 1 week increases detection of BPA in urine by 2 thirds.
Another point I've never seen discussed in any of these studies is the question of whether or not we're talking about cooked or raw food that's been stored in one of these kinds of containers. I could see if there was clear evidence that eating raw, uncooked food that had a high propensity to absorb and pass on the BPA in dangerous dosages, or even dosages high enough that constant repetitive exposure would be an issue; like if you were eating a fruit with a high acid level and high moisture, regularly, that was being stored in said fashion. But I've never seen any study differentiate the potential danger levels between raw vs. cooked foods, or even one that mentioned any particular kind of food that was highly susceptible to contamination from BPA. I would think this should be a focal point of great interest if this is something we're going to continue doing research on. I means seriously, if this was a real pressing concern for humanity, I would think that the people involved in these studies would have identified at least one food that was inarguably dangerous to eat when it had been stored in a plastic container containing BPA, and would be able to supply some kind of measurable statistics, such as the exact or fat level of the food, the length of time the food had been stored in the container, the length of time required before whatever test study that was involved (that was biologically similar enough to humans that the findings were decidedly significant) started to show measurable health effects, etc. So far, all I've seen is highly generalized information; lots of "certain kinds of foods" with no specifics cited; lots of maybes and theoretical scenarios.
 For my part, I'm only using it store pizza dough, which does not fit the criteria of having a high content of either fat or acid, and it's going to be cooked anyway. I have seen no evidence presented so far that demonstrates that the food I'm storing in it would be susceptible to BPA contamination, or that the BPA wouldn't be rendered harmless by cooking. And I'm only using the dough I store in my container once or twice a week at most, so the constant exposure is a non-issue as far as I'm concerned. None of this means that I wouldn't be persuaded to change my mind if I saw enough clear and convincing evidence, but this has not happened yet.
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Offline RHawthorne

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Re: Small dough box for proofing
« Reply #19 on: April 14, 2022, 12:32:37 PM »
BPA leeching in water bottles is pretty much the basic minimum.
Just drinking water from polycarbonate bottles over 1 week increases detection of BPA in urine by 2 thirds.
I knew that. I'm more concerned about food. I think it goes without saying that any kind of liquid has a much higher propensity to absorb BPA than any kind of food. And again, the constant exposure is the issue.
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