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Author Topic: It's thin, crispy, tender....same techniques as a cracker, but made for the home  (Read 1885 times)

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Offline fazzari

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Monkeyboy
Nice looking pizza!  I think the bottom says it all.  My question for you is this:  are you a fan of classical laminated cracker crusts (which usually have a very low hydration rate), and if so how does the pizza you just made compare?  Thanks for any input you can give me

John

Offline Monkeyboy

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Monkeyboy
Nice looking pizza!  I think the bottom says it all.  My question for you is this:  are you a fan of classical laminated cracker crusts (which usually have a very low hydration rate), and if so how does the pizza you just made compare?  Thanks for any input you can give me

John

I have not made enough cracker crusts to give a fair comparison.  Past attempt were like cardboard.   
First time using this lamination technique - it really is super simple when it comes time to cook.  Might try 3 sheets vs 4 and maybe docking it a bit.  But yes, I'd make this again and again.

Offline Monkeyboy

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Another try with this style.  Same procedure but used 100% All Trumps flour.   And used a propane pizza oven / higher temps - to see the effect.

Pepperoni one was docked prior to baking - you can see the dough did not bubble up as much.
Sausage one, I put the sauce on top and did not dock it.  Edges bubbled up and pushed ingredients to the center.  The sauce on top got a little watery.

Launched when the floor was 725-750 degrees, top burner on low.  Total cook time was just under 2 minutes.

I liked that I got some well done edges, BUT...the crust middle / bottom was a bit gummy.  I think this style needed a lower temp ->longer bake time.


Offline fazzari

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Monkeyboy
May I humbly offer you a couple of thoughts.  All pizzas are not created the same.  In a commercial operation, every aspect of the dough making operation is monitored as to create as much uniformity as one can.  Thus the correct temperature to bake the perfect pie stays as close to a "norm" as possible.  Having said that, the perfect laminated cracker has only one perfect bake temperature.  Sometimes we blame the crust, when in reality, the crust was fine, the baking temperature was way off.  The goal is to have the the top and the bottom finish at exactly the same time......that is the perfect crust

john

Offline Monkeyboy

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No doubt John...

I had high hopes (no science behind it) that higher heat might give even crispier crust results...the opposite was true.  Agree - that different styles require different 'treatment'

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Offline SamBam

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Dear Fazzari,
I tried your recipe 2 days ago-it was the bomb! Sorry, no pics-I ate the evidence. It really was a thin crust, both crunchy and delicious.
I used bread flour and peanut oil. Sauce was a white made with cream, mozz, and cream cheese. Toppings were full fat mozz and hormel pepperoni.
Thanks again, this recipe is a winner!
Sam

Offline fazzari

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Excellent, good to hear

john

Offline sodface

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John, I gave this a go and tried to follow your formula and workflow except I accidentally overshot the oil by 5g. I think it worked anyway!
Carl

Offline fazzari

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Sodface
The secret to this pizza is the technique..   I think you nailed it!!

John

Offline fazzari

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I decided to try a head to head comparison between a dough made by using the directions of this thread and a skin made at the restaurant (38% hydration, mixed in 140 quart Hobart for 6 minutes, thinned on a Rondo sheeter.  My homemade skin was placed in freezer for 1 hour after formation, and then placed in the fridge for 43 hours.

In the following photos, the homemade skin is on the left.  Both pizzas were baked in a 550 degree oven.

John

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Offline fazzari

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The following are pictures of the pizza made from the homemade skin.

John

Offline fazzari

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The following are pictures of the pizza made with the commercially made skin.

John


Offline fazzari

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My conclusion for this day on these 2 pizzas is:

The best looking pizza was the commercially made one (it had real nice oven spring around the outside edge)
Both pizzas were delicious.
The handmade pizza was a little more tender.

Having said that, I conclude that raising the hydration doesn't affect the quality of this pizza at all.  Notice that the sausage was put on raw and cooked just fine.  A poor laminated cracker crust will not allow the transfer of heat from the bottom to the top.  This transfer of heat is what cooks the raw meats and makes pizza skins tender.
Also know that the last picture of each pizza (the one where I'm holding a slice in my hand) was taken 2.5 hours after the pizzas were baked.  These pizzas maintain not only their crispness, but their tenderness as time passes.

I just don't think this can be made any easier...just my humble opinion

John

Offline sodface

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John,

Can you describe the sauce you use on these? What size are those, like 10-12"? Semolina underneath? They look great and I like the gooey melt.
Carl

Offline fazzari

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Sodface
Those are 10" pizzas.  The sauce is made from Stanislaus 7 11s.  We use cornmeal to slide pizzas off of our peels.  Cheese is low moisture mozzarella

john

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