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Author Topic: Malty Laminated Beer Pizza  (Read 78915 times)

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Offline DNA Dan

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Re: Malty Laminated Beer Pizza
« Reply #200 on: May 14, 2019, 01:24:19 PM »
Glad you feel it's heading where you want it. It looks crispier from the photos.

How was the flavor from the bear lard? I heard once that bear meat has a very peculiar flavor to it.

For the layer separation there's a few things at play that I noticed:

1) How many passes in the sheeter you perform?
2) How fast you drive the dough down to the next thickness?
3) The final thickness of the skin?
4) The dough hydration.

There's certainly a lot at play with the sheeting. I have been doing it for a while now and still haven't mastered it. It's definitely an art.

Offline joelweb

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Re: Malty Laminated Beer Pizza
« Reply #201 on: May 14, 2019, 02:29:08 PM »
Thanks, Dan.

I didn't notice the lard in the flavor profile. Bear lard isn't all that different from pig lard, and despite what you might think, bear meat is very mild. I use bear lard in pie crust with great results, and they have a more delicate flavor than pizza.

In terms of separation, I'm trying to minimize the number of passes as you have suggested in previous posts.

My sheeter is 20" wide so I sheet it until the dough is about 16-18" wide and then rotate the dough 90 degrees, crank the sheeter down to 1/8 inch and do a final pass. I then rub all surfaces with flour, do the business letter fold, and then sheet back down to about 1/8" in three (or sometimes four) passes. I just marked my sheeter so I now know exactly which increments of adjustment to use, which will enable me to be more consistent and reduce to the number of passes--both before and after I do the fold.

What are your thoughts on driving down the dough quickly, versus doing it in several passes? I find that when first working with the dough it doesn't want pass through the sheeter, but after a few passes it rolls out easily. Because of this, it always requires more passes before the fold than after the fold.

In regards to hydration, I haven't messed with that yet.



Offline DNA Dan

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Re: Malty Laminated Beer Pizza
« Reply #202 on: May 15, 2019, 11:39:54 AM »
What are your thoughts on driving down the dough quickly, versus doing it in several passes? I find that when first working with the dough it doesn't want pass through the sheeter, but after a few passes it rolls out easily. Because of this, it always requires more passes before the fold than after the fold.


This is my experience as well. Driving it down faster typically equates to less passes = less dough development. But it's really hard on the sheeter. I read a few reports of some places using very industrial grade sheeters, so there may be some evidence that this is the way most commercial places sheet their dough. I certainly don't want to break my expensive toy! One thing I noticed on my sheeter, and I'm not sure if this is just the Somerset one that I have, but if you drive it down too quickly the first pass is not a "true" thickness of that setting. In other words there seems to be some "overload" or flex to the rollers to prevent the machine from breaking itself. If I pass it at the same thickness setting a second time, the thickness is more true to that particular setting.

I've also played around with making it too thin, performing 2-3 book folds, then hitting it with just 1 pass at my desired thickness. The result seems to more or less be the same, the less developed the dough is, ie. the less passes I do, the more bubbling I get in the crust. Interestingly it almost always seems to be the bottom layer separating from the rest of the upper layers. Not sure if that aspect is a function of how it's cooked on the stone, or dough formulation. Rarely do I see a lot of separation of the upper layers on top the dough. Toppings and sauce may have a role to play in that as well.

Offline joelweb

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Re: Malty Laminated Beer Pizza
« Reply #203 on: May 15, 2019, 09:47:52 PM »
Interesting. Thanks. I have found that a second pass at the same setting will further drive the dough down, too.

The sheeter that I happened to stumble upon is an EMW model 20. It has real grease zerks on the bearings and is what they used to use in Round Table pizzas. It came out of some closed down pizza joint in a small town in eastern Oregon. The thing is a power house and seems to enjoy flattening balls of dough in one pass. I'll keep learning how to use it more effectively.

Offline Chicago Bob

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Re: Malty Laminated Beer Pizza
« Reply #204 on: June 21, 2019, 04:05:18 PM »
Okay. I have broken through my "smell block" lol. I was researching a few different things online and came across something that makes a fantastic smell while cooking. I was reminded of Zing's suggestion (I think it was you.) who said the aroma is like Sara Lee breadsticks or something to that effect. I looked at several dry cheese powders and came across something that is also available through foodservice in larger quantities. I've only made a few pies with it so far, but wanted to share with you guys to get more feedback. There are several products out there like this, but what makes this one special is it does not have parsely in it. So if you use an amount <1% you cannot tell it's in the dough, and it would not have to be listed on any bag. Would be great if you guys could try it out and tell me what you think. I bought mine on ebay through some storefront called "Cheapees".

Basically I am convinced there's something in the dough. *That smell* is not the product of the yeast, nor the fermentation products. I have made highly fermented doughs of several retardation times, and they don't even come close to approaching that smell. I'm convinced we're dealing with some additive in the mix.



    "That Smell"   is so simple. It's just an aged pizza oven with all it's history of spill over pizza pie bakes...that's it. I have a1yr. old high and professional oven in my kitchen...i don't know how to use the high temp oven clean cycle and I don't want to know.  Believe me, the oven is not all nasty(anal types would probably have a panty bunch fit)  but my German GF bakers pastries in it every Sunday and she is a sorta clean clean freak....so, let some pizza goodness remain on oven surfaces.
My kitchen smells like a Chicago pizza joint in about 15 minutes of preheat.... :pizza:
"Care Free Highway...let me slip away on you"

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Offline DNA Dan

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Re: Malty Laminated Beer Pizza
« Reply #205 on: July 12, 2019, 01:42:03 PM »
I hear you Bob. My Dad tells me stories of a bakery in his youth in Niagara Falls, NY that would occasionally throw Romano cheese in their deck ovens to produce a burnt cheese smell which you could smell from the street.

For me, *that smell is a curiosity because it definitely is "in" the product, and it was noticeable across a few different brands. I didn't notice it in just Shakey's pizza, but in other places, some were chains, some were independent. It could still be the case however that these places just all used similar ingredients from the same local food service and *that smell was just that, thousands of pies cooked in a greasy oven. Sadly, I don't really find it around anymore. Ingredients have changed, clean standards have increased, places have gone out of business,  etc.

Offline invertedisdead

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Re: Malty Laminated Beer Pizza
« Reply #206 on: August 07, 2019, 06:48:42 PM »
It could still be the case however that these places just all used similar ingredients from the same local food service and *that smell was just that, thousands of pies cooked in a greasy oven. Sadly, I don't really find it around anymore. Ingredients have changed, clean standards have increased, places have gone out of business,  etc.

I wonder if it's because most of those shops don't use deck ovens any more?
the proof is in the pizza

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