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Author Topic: Rolling your own sauce  (Read 551 times)

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Offline malmoore

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Rolling your own sauce
« on: January 02, 2019, 03:25:04 AM »
Hi all,

Iíve been doing a bit of research on how to make my pizzas (mostly Lou Malnati clones) better, and one of the things Iíve noticed is that there isnít much info on rolling sauces completely from scratch. A lot of people say Ďuse 6-in-1 or some other brand as a starter, then add pizza seasoning / spices / etc. to tasteí or something along those lines. Iím curious as to what the best route is when all you have are actual fresh tomatoes and the associated spices and garnishes (garlic, onion, etc.)

I understand that cooking up the sauce (even simmering) is taboo, iím guessing I can sautť my garlic and onions in butter and then fold them into some cold crushed/ground/etc tomatoes, then add some spices to taste? Would that still count as uncooked? What is the reasoning behind not even simmering a hand-rolled sauce?

Anyway, any thoughts are welcome. I did a first stab at a completely scratch sauce and it came out pretty well, though I did simmer the ground tomatoes. Iím probably totally overthinking this. Thanks.

Offline Garvey

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Re: Rolling your own sauce
« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2019, 08:33:43 AM »
There are probably many reasons why people don't make sauce from fresh tomatoes.  The main reason is that almost no pizzerias do this, and this board is mostly people replicating the style of pizzas found in pizzerias around Chicago.  That said, I'd be interested in hearing more about what you're been trying!  Got recipes, measurements, cooking methods and times, notes from trials-and-errors, etc.?  Could be a great starting point for the rest of us!  Thanks!

Offline Dangerous Salumi

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Re: Rolling your own sauce
« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2019, 12:39:24 PM »
Ive made my own pizza sauce from garden grown tomatoes and it was awesome.

This is how I make tomatoes sauce from tomatoes
1) Procure an adult beverage
2) Dip the fresh very ripe tomatoes (I was using July 4th and Rutgers) in hot water to loosen the skins and remove them
3) Cut out the top
4) Immersion blend the tomatoes
5) Simmer
6) Stir
7) Procure another adult beverage at an appropriate interval
Repeat 5-7 until sauce is thick (be careful with the temperature so it doesn't stick as it gets thicker)

Have a Dangerous day!


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Offline nickyr

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Re: Rolling your own sauce
« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2019, 03:59:27 PM »
There are probably many reasons why people don't make sauce from fresh tomatoes.  The main reason is that almost no pizzerias do this, and this board is mostly people replicating the style of pizzas found in pizzerias around Chicago.

I believe the reason places typically use canned is because canned tomatoes are picked ripe, so the flavor is stronger. Most grocery store tomatoes are picked green. But if you have fresh tomatoes from a garden or farmers market, you can pick them ripe yourself and that could possibly be even tastier.

Many people prefer not to cook their sauces because you can lose a bit of the fresh taste. But you can also gain other tastes. So itís kind of your preference. Iíve even heard of people adding a can of uncooked tomatoes to a cooked sauce to get the best of both. Havenít tried it myself.

Offline jsaras

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Re: Rolling your own sauce
« Reply #4 on: January 02, 2019, 04:01:56 PM »
Canned tomatoes are already cooked in the canning process.  So the "prohibition" on cooking tomatoes does not apply if you are making a sauce from fresh tomatoes.
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Offline Garvey

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Re: Rolling your own sauce
« Reply #5 on: January 03, 2019, 09:10:28 PM »
I believe the reason places typically use canned is because canned tomatoes are picked ripe, so the flavor is stronger. Most grocery store tomatoes are picked green.

True, but the reasons a pizzeria would use canned tomatoes is (1) for consistency and replicability and (2) labor savings.  A factory has already done all the work on a thankless, messy, laborious task with consistent results.

Offline malmoore

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Re: Rolling your own sauce
« Reply #6 on: January 04, 2019, 06:35:26 PM »
Thanks for the replies, everyone!  :D

Iíve only done it once so far, putting my own spin on the American Test Kitchen video, and it actually came out pretty good for the first time. I used red onions rather than white and found it gave a pretty nice savory-sweet flavor. Iím going to give it another shot today.

Dangerous, how long did you simmer for? I went about 30 minutes.

Thanks again!

Offline Francois.du.nord

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Re: Rolling your own sauce
« Reply #7 on: April 16, 2019, 06:54:38 PM »
All of this comes from some posts here back when I was deep in the deep dish learning mode. Others have addressed your tomato concerns. I'll hit spices:

I've had great success cooking the aromatics to release the flavors before incorporating them into the cold tomatoes.  Yes, sautť your onion and garlic in olive oil until translucent.

Put your aromatics (basil, oregano,fennel etc) in a pyrex dish and just moisten with tap water. Hit it with the microwave (there was a complicated formula for watts x time, but I just use my senses. Heat to hot, but don't burn). Stir your onion/garlic and aromatics into the cold tomato sauce. Add salt and other spices.

Rock on!

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