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Author Topic: Tom, Does my mixer compare to yours  (Read 1288 times)

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Offline mkevenson

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Tom, Does my mixer compare to yours
« on: November 02, 2014, 10:32:53 PM »
Tom, you recently posted a reply to a member who is having trouble opening his dough ball. You wrote,
"We just completed our annual pizza class this afternoon and one of our demonstration doughs that the students worked with was made with a 12.8% protein content flour, 58% absorption, 1.75% salt, 0.375% IDY and 2% oil. The dough was mixed for 8-minutes at medium speed and came off of the mixer at 78F, ..."


I was wondering how my Bosch compact mixer at speed #1 compares to the mixer you used in your class, as mentioned above?


My DB opens easily with gentle stretching, my problem is the skin is not suitable for more aggressive stretching, or tossing to stretch. I understand that many do not use tossing as an opening method, I however would like to be able to toss my skin, just as part of my pizza making education.


You have in the past educated me on telling when the kneading process by mixer is optimal, I try to use your instruction but feel that I may be under kneading the dough and so ask this question.


Mark
"Gettin' better all the time" Beatles

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Tom, Does my mixer compare to yours
« Reply #1 on: November 02, 2014, 11:10:38 PM »
Mark;
The mixer that we used during our pizza seminar was a Hobart Legacy model with an 80-quart bowl and a reverse spiral dough arm. We mixed our doughs just until they had a smooth appearance which allowed us to round the scaled dough pieces without tearing the skin (this makes rounding faster and easier to accomplish which is important when you're rounding 80+ pounds of dough into dough balls weighing between 10 and 16-ounces). All of the doughs came off of the mixer between 80 and 82F, we had all of the dough balls ready to go into the cooler within 20-minutes of coming off of the mixer. Dough boxes were cross stacked for 2-hours, then down stacked and covered. The dough was ready to use on the following day after about 22-hours in the cooler. To use the dough balls we brought them out of the cooler and allowed them to temper at room temperature for 2.5 to 3-hours before beginning to open them into pizza skins. We had absolutely no problem opening randomly selected dough balls up to about 40-inches in diameter, in fact the students had fun doing it. Pizzas from these doughs cane out great. Note: we opened the dough balls up to 40-inches just to demonstrate biochemical gluten development. The correct amount of mixing for a pizza dough is just until the dough begins to take on a smooth, creamy appearance in the mixing bowl.
I hope this helps.
Tom Lehmann/The Dough Doctor

Offline The Dough Doctor

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Re: Tom, Does my mixer compare to yours
« Reply #2 on: November 02, 2014, 11:14:07 PM »
Mark;
I forgot to add, if you find that your dough is too tight to open easily by hand tossing, just begin increasing the dough absorption gradually until the dough is sufficiently soft to open easily, if you get the absorption too high you will find yourself putting your hand/fingers through the dough, so a little experimenting might be in order.
Tom Lehmann/TDD

Offline mkevenson

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Re: Tom, Does my mixer compare to yours
« Reply #3 on: November 03, 2014, 08:31:29 AM »
Tom, thank you for the detailed reply. Next batch I am going to use the dough recipe you posted with the 0.375% IDY, I have been using 0.2% for cold, 40 F ferment. Perhaps I have been kneading too long with the mistaken thought that I could increase the strength of the skin that way. I need to reexamine the biochemical gluten development you speak of.

Mark
"Gettin' better all the time" Beatles

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